LWW Trans/Ed. 07-16-20

July 16 2020

General News, Page 1-3

Are You Ready? Earthquake Preparedness
by Eloy Gomez
GRF safety/emergency coordinator

Many Americans have become so concerned about COVID-19 that they have forgotten about preparing or maintaining their emergency survival kits for other disasters.
“Disasters don’t stop for a virus,” says Craig Fugate, former administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).
Still, experts stress that people living in disaster-prone regions are not helpless. Personal preparation is more important than ever—from fine-tuning disaster kits to volunteering in shelter management, community emergency response team CERT, or by taking a course in First Aid, CPR and AED. “We can always shape a better future,”
The COVID-19 virus has forced most Leisure World shareholders to remain in their homes, which is not all bad because now would be the perfect time to purchase or build your emergency preparedness kit, and to check your existing kit to ensure expired items are rotated and replaced.
Emergency kits are vital for anyone living in disaster-prone areas, and they contain many of the same supplies that people bought to hunker down during the pandemic. In this issue, you will find a guide with tips to create and organize you emergency kit, secure your space, plan to be safe during and after a disaster and much more.
See the special Earthquake Prep section on pages 14-15.

Prepare to Protect Yourself
California has endured more than its fair share of destructive earthquakes in the last few decades—among them Sylmar in 1971, Whittier Narrows in 1987, Loma Prieta in 1989 and Northridge in 1994.
All those quakes caused major damage and resulted in loss of life. But they were not true seismic catastrophes, according to the experts. Much bigger quakes are possible, more to the scale of the infamous 1906 San Francisco quake.
That monster earthquake struck the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18, 1906, with an estimated magnitude of 7.9. Devastating fires broke out in San Franciso and lasted for several days. More than 3,000 people died. Over 80 percent of the city was destroyed. It is remembered as one of the deadliest earthquakes in U.S history, according to Wikipedia. It caused the greatest loss of life from a natural disaster in California’s history.
Southern California Scenario
In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey published a 308-page ShakeOut Earthquake Scenario that is still used today. More than 300 scientists and other experts, led by well-known seismologist Lucy Jones, took part in drafting scenario.
It’s a hypothetical look of what a magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the San Andreas fault would look like. Jones, who has visited Leisure World in years past to talk about readiness, said the massive study makes it painfully clear that people need to be prepared.
In the report, geologists determined which section of the San Andreas was most likely to blow and studied the scenario that would unfold in the event of a 7.8 magnitude tremor—55 seconds of strong shaking in downtown L.A.—more than seven times the duration of the last big L.A.-area temblor, the 1994 Northridge quake, a magnitude 6.7 generated along a previously unknown fault.
There would be landslides and liquefaction and massive damage to roads, rail lines, water conveyance tunnels and aqueducts, electrical and natural gas lines, and telecommunications cables.
In an earthquake of this size, the shaking will last for nearly two minutes. Such an earthquake will cause unprecedented damage to Southern California—greatly overshadowing the massive damage that occurred in Northridge’s 6.7-magnitude earthquake in 1994.
The ShakeOut Scenario estimates a 7.8 magnitude earthquake will cause over 1,800 deaths, 50,000 injuries, $200 billion in damage and other losses and severe, long-lasting disruption.
Unlike the COVID-19 crisis, there will be no panic-buying; the stores will be closed and supply lines, cut.
One way to protect yourself is to make note of the items you would want in a disaster situation and keep them on hand at all times because an earthquake will come with no notice. But food that has at least a one-year shelf life—peanut butter, tuna fish, canned fruit.
How to Prepare
Everyone needs a disaster supplies kit with essential food, water, and supplies for at least three days and up to two weeks. Keep this kit in a designated place and have it ready in case you have to leave your home quickly. Make sure all family members know where the kit is kept. It should be in one container and ready to “grab and go” in case you are evacuated (for a specific list, see ???)
How to Protect Yourself When an Earthquake Happens
If an earthquake happens, protect yourself right away.
• If you are in a car, pull over and stop. Set your parking brake.
• If you are in bed, turn face down and cover your head and neck with a pillow.
• If you are outdoors, stay outdoors away from buildings.
• Do not get in a doorway.
• Do not run outside.
• Drop, Cover and Hold On. That means to drop, cover your head and hold on where you are. It’s safest not to move until the shaking stops.
“We have an irrational fear of earthquakes, partly because they create a feeling of being out of control,” said “Earthquake Lady” Lucy Jones in a February 2012 Smithsonian magazine article by Amy Wallace. “We’re afraid of dying in them, even though the risk is extremely small. You’re almost undoubtedly going to live through it. And probably your house is going to be OK. It’s the aftermath that we need to prepare for.”
Life After a Big Quake
In the event of a big one, scenarios show that a rupture 180 miles away will cause shaking of up to two-and-a-half minutes in Seal Beach; 300,000 buildings will be compromised, 18,000 people will die, mostly from falling debris, and there will be $213 billion in damage.
All highways will be affected in the region’s eight counties.
Ham radio operators will be your best friends. And Leisure World has an active Radio Service Club that will likely be the first interface between residents and local emergency services. In addition, there is an active CERT community led by GRF Safety and Emergency Coordinator Eloy Gomez and LWer Phil Mandeville. CERT stands for Community Emergency Response Team.
Many of your neighbors and friends have attended CERT training and are certified in basic emergency response skills, such as extinguishing small fires, providing basic medical aid, searching for and rescue victims safely, and organizing themselves and spontaneous volunteers to be effective. CERT training is typically held twice a year in Leisure World and publicized in the LW Weekly.
This is a huge benefit to residents, as fire and police departments will be dealing with the most serious situations and may be unable to respond quickly to issues in Leisure World.
Mutual aid coming from Northern California or San Diego could take weeks to arrive.
Immediately After An Earthquake
Right after an earthquake, people may need to evacuate, help the injured and prevent further damage.
Since LWers are near the ocean, it might be necessary to head for higher ground as soon as they can safely move.
Tsunami waves can arrive within minutes.
• Go on foot. Roads and bridges may be damaged.
• Stay away from the coast until officials tell you it is safe to return. The danger may last for days.
• If you need to evacuate to a shelter, take your “grab-and-go” bag. Shelters have limited space.
Prevent further damage:
• Be prepared for aftershocks. Stay away from anything that looks like it may fall.
• Large fires are a sign to evacuate. If you have a fire extinguisher handy, put out small fires.
• Unplug appliances and electronics. When the power comes back, damaged appliances and electronics could start a fire.
Let people know:
• Register on the Red Cross SafeAndWell.org website so people will know you are okay.
• Phone service may be out. When possible, text or call your out-of-area contact and tell them where you are, then stay off the phone. This will allow calls to be made for emergencies.
Stay informed:
• Surf the radio dial to find a station that is on the air. Listen to the NOAA Weather Radio for emergency information.
The First Days after The Earthquake
• Do not enter your home until you know it’s safe.
• Check for damaged electrical wiring and broken water pipes.
• Monitor local radio or television reports about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing and financial assistance.
• Check on your neighbors.
• Use your refrigerated and frozen food first and save the canned goods for later.
• Take pictures of damage to your property and home.
• Contact your insurance agent or company right away to begin your claims process. Keep records of any repair or cleaning costs.
The First Weeks After the Earthquake
• If the electricity went off and then came back on, check your appliances or electronic equipment for damage.
• Contact the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), or other federal and state agencies to find out about financial assistance for your home, apartment, farm or business.
Leisure World is an active best participant in the Great California Shakeout, an annual statewide earthquake drill. If people practice the “drop, cover and hold” technique, their bodies will know what to do when the unthinkable happens.

California has endured more than its fair share of destructive earthquakes in the last few decades—among them Sylmar in 1971, Whittier Narrows in 1987, Loma Prieta in 1989 and Northridge in 1994.
All those quakes caused major damage and resulted in loss of life. But they were not true seismic catastrophes, according to the experts. Much bigger quakes are possible, more to the scale of the infamous 1906 San Francisco quake.
That monster earthquake struck the coast of Northern California at 5:12 a.m. on Wednesday, April 18, 1906, with an estimated magnitude of 7.9. Devastating fires broke out in San Franciso and lasted for several days. More than 3,000 people died. Over 80 percent of the city was destroyed. It is remembered as one of the deadliest earthquakes in U.S history, according to Wikipedia. It caused the greatest loss of life from a natural disaster in California’s history.
Southern California Scenario
In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey published a 308-page ShakeOut Earthquake Scenario that is still used today. More than 300 scientists and other experts, led by well-known seismologist Lucy Jones, took part in drafting scenario.
It’s a hypothetical look of what a magnitude 7.8 earthquake on the San Andreas fault would look like. Jones, who has visited Leisure World in years past to talk about readiness, said the massive study makes it painfully clear that people need to be prepared.
In the report, geologists determined which section of the San Andreas was most likely to blow and studied the scenario that would unfold in the event of a 7.8 magnitude tremor—55 seconds of strong shaking in downtown L.A.—more than seven times the duration of the last big L.A.-area temblor, the 1994 Northridge quake, a magnitude 6.7 generated along a previously unknown fault.
There would be landslides and liquefaction and massive damage to roads, rail lines, water conveyance tunnels and aqueducts, electrical and natural gas lines, and telecommunications cables.
In an earthquake of this size, the shaking will last for nearly two minutes. Such an earthquake will cause unprecedented damage to Southern California—greatly overshadowing the massive damage that occurred in Northridge’s 6.7-magnitude earthquake in 1994.
The ShakeOut Scenario estimates a 7.8 magnitude earthquake will cause over 1,800 deaths, 50,000 injuries, $200 billion in damage and other losses and severe, long-lasting disruption.
Unlike the COVID-19 crisis, there will be no panic-buying; the stores will be closed and supply lines, cut.
One way to protect yourself is to make note of the items you would want in a disaster situation and keep them on hand at all times because an earthquake will come with no notice. But food that has at least a one-year shelf life—peanut butter, tuna fish, canned fruit.
How to Prepare
Everyone needs a disaster supplies kit with essential food, water, and supplies for at least three days and up to two weeks. Keep this kit in a designated place and have it ready in case you have to leave your home quickly. Make sure all family members know where the kit is kept. It should be in one container and ready to “grab and go” in case you are evacuated (for a specific list, see ???)
How to Protect Yourself When an Earthquake Happens
If an earthquake happens, protect yourself right away.
• If you are in a car, pull over and stop. Set your parking brake.
• If you are in bed, turn face down and cover your head and neck with a pillow.
• If you are outdoors, stay outdoors away from buildings.
• Do not get in a doorway.
• Do not run outside.
• Drop, Cover and Hold On. That means to drop, cover your head and hold on where you are. It’s safest not to move until the shaking stops.
“We have an irrational fear of earthquakes, partly because they create a feeling of being out of control,” said “Earthquake Lady” Lucy Jones in a February 2012 Smithsonian magazine article by Amy Wallace. “We’re afraid of dying in them, even though the risk is extremely small. You’re almost undoubtedly going to live through it. And probably your house is going to be OK. It’s the aftermath that we need to prepare for.”
Life After a Big Quake
In the event of a big one, scenarios show that a rupture 180 miles away will cause shaking of up to two-and-a-half minutes in Seal Beach; 300,000 buildings will be compromised, 18,000 people will die, mostly from falling debris, and there will be $213 billion in damage.
All highways will be affected in the region’s eight counties.
Ham radio operators will be your best friends. And Leisure World has an active Radio Service Club that will likely be the first interface between residents and local emergency services. In addition, there is an active CERT community led by GRF Safety and Emergency Coordinator Eloy Gomez and LWer Phil Mandeville. CERT stands for Community Emergency Response Team.
Many of your neighbors and friends have attended CERT training and are certified in basic emergency response skills, such as extinguishing small fires, providing basic medical aid, searching for and rescue victims safely, and organizing themselves and spontaneous volunteers to be effective. CERT training is typically held twice a year in Leisure World and publicized in the LW Weekly.
This is a huge benefit to residents, as fire and police departments will be dealing with the most serious situations and may be unable to respond quickly to issues in Leisure World.
Mutual aid coming from Northern California or San Diego could take weeks to arrive.
Immediately After An Earthquake
Right after an earthquake, people may need to evacuate, help the injured and prevent further damage.
Since LWers are near the ocean, it might be necessary to head for higher ground as soon as they can safely move.
Tsunami waves can arrive within minutes.
• Go on foot. Roads and bridges may be damaged.
• Stay away from the coast until officials tell you it is safe to return. The danger may last for days.
• If you need to evacuate to a shelter, take your “grab-and-go” bag. Shelters have limited space.
Prevent further damage:
• Be prepared for aftershocks. Stay away from anything that looks like it may fall.
• Large fires are a sign to evacuate. If you have a fire extinguisher handy, put out small fires.
• Unplug appliances and electronics. When the power comes back, damaged appliances and electronics could start a fire.
Let people know:
• Register on the Red Cross SafeAndWell.org website so people will know you are okay.
• Phone service may be out. When possible, text or call your out-of-area contact and tell them where you are, then stay off the phone. This will allow calls to be made for emergencies.
Stay informed:
• Surf the radio dial to find a station that is on the air. Listen to the NOAA Weather Radio for emergency information.
The First Days after The Earthquake
• Do not enter your home until you know it’s safe.
• Check for damaged electrical wiring and broken water pipes.
• Monitor local radio or television reports about where to get emergency housing, food, first aid, clothing and financial assistance.
• Check on your neighbors.
• Use your refrigerated and frozen food first and save the canned goods for later.
• Take pictures of damage to your property and home.
• Contact your insurance agent or company right away to begin your claims process. Keep records of any repair or cleaning costs.
The First Weeks After the Earthquake
• If the electricity went off and then came back on, check your appliances or electronic equipment for damage.
• Contact the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA), or other federal and state agencies to find out about financial assistance for your home, apartment, farm or business.
Leisure World is an active best participant in the Great California Shakeout, an annual statewide earthquake drill. If people practice the “drop, cover and hold” technique, their bodies will know what to do when the unthinkable happens.

When the Power Goes Out
Extended power outages may impact the whole community and the economy. A power outage is when the electrical power goes out unexpectedly. A power outage may:
• Disrupt communications, water and transportation.
• Close retail businesses, grocery stores, gas stations, ATMs, banks and other services.
• Cause food spoilage and water contamination.
• Prevent use of medical devices.
PROTECT YOURSELF DURING A POWER OUTAGE:
• Keep freezers and refrigerators closed.
• Only use generators outdoors and away from windows.
• Do not use a gas stove to heat your home.
• Disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges.
• Have alternate plans for refrigerating medicines or using power-dependent medical devices.
• If safe, go to an alternate location for heat or cooling.
• Check on neighbors.
HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN A POWER OUTAGE THREATENS:
• Prepare now.
• Take an inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity.
• Talk to your medical provider about a power outage plan for medical devices powered by electricity and refrigerated medicines. Find out how long medication can be stored at higher temperatures and get specific guidance for any medications that are critical for life.
• Plan for batteries and other alternatives to meet your needs when the power goes out.
• Sign up for local alerts and warning systems. Monitor weather reports.
• Install carbon monoxide detectors with battery backup in central locations on every level of your home.
• Determine whether your home phone will work in a power outage and how long battery backup will last.
• Review the supplies that are available in case of a power outage. Have flashlights with extra batteries for every household member. Have enough nonperishable food and water.
• Use a thermometer in the refrigerator and freezer so that you can know the temperature when the power is restored. Throw out food if the temperature is 40 degrees or higher.
• Keep mobile phones and other electric equipment charged and gas tanks full.
HOW TO SURVIVE DURING A POWER OUTAGE
• Keep freezers and refrigerators closed. The refrigerator will keep food cold for about four hours. A full freezer will keep the temperature for about 48 hours. Use coolers with ice if necessary. Monitor temperatures with a thermometer.
• Maintain food supplies that do not require refrigeration.
• Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Generators, camp stoves, or charcoal grills should always be used outdoors and at least 20 feet away from windows. Never use a gas stovetop or oven to heat your home.
• Check on your neighbors. Older adults and young children are especially vulnerable to extreme temperatures.
• Go to a community location with power if heat or cold is extreme.
• Turn off or disconnect appliances, equipment or electronics. Power may return with momentary “surges” or “spikes” that can cause damage.
BE SAFE AFTER
• When in doubt, throw it out.
Throw away any food that has been exposed to temperatures 40 degrees or higher for two hours or more, or that has an unusual odor, color or texture.
• If the power is out for more than a day, discard any medication that should be refrigerated, unless the drug’s label says otherwise. If a life depends on the refrigerated drugs, consult a doctor or pharmacist and use medicine only until a new supply is available.
For more information, see https://www.ready.gov/power-outages.

How to protect yourself if you are disabled
People with disabilities are more vulnerable than most in a disaster. It’s imperative that they have a plan because access to medical facilities or even a drugstores could be nonexistent. Additional planning steps should include:
Create a Support Network
• Keep a contact list in a watertight container in your emergency kit.
• Be ready to explain to first responders that you need to evacuate and choose to go to a shelter with your family, service animal, caregiver, personal assistant and your assistive technology devices and supplies.
• Inform your support network where you keep your emergency supplies. You may want to consider giving one member a key to your house or apartment.
• If you are dependent on dialysis or other life-sustaining treatment know the location and availability of more than one facility.
• If you use medical equipment in your home that requires electricity, talk to your doctor or health care provider about how you can prepare for its use during a power outage.
• Wear medical alert tags or bracelets.
• If you have a communication disability, make sure your emergency information describes the best way to communicate with you.
• Plan how you will communicate with others if your equipment is not working, including laminated cards with phrases, pictures or pictograms.
• Keep Braille/text communication cards, if used, for two-way communication.
Get Benefits Electronically
A disaster can disrupt mail service for days or weeks. If you depend on Social Security or other regular benefits, switching to electronic payments is a simple, significant way to protect yourself financially before disaster strikes. It also eliminates the risk of stolen checks. The U.S. Department of the Treasury recommends two safer ways to get federal benefits:
• Direct deposit to a checking or savings account. If you get federal benefits you can sign up by calling (800) 333-1795 or sign up online.
• The Direct Express prepaid debit card is a safe and easy alternative to paper checks. Call toll-free at (877) 212-9991 or sign up online.
Build a Kit
In addition to having your basic survival supplies, an emergency kit should have items to meet your individual needs in various emergencies. Consider the items you use on a daily basis and which ones you may need to add to your kit.
Tips for people who are hard of hearing:
• A weather radio (with text display and a flashing alert)
• Extra hearing-aid batteries
• A TTY
• Pen and paper (in case you have to communicate with someone who does not know sign language)
Tips for people who are blind or have low vision:
• Mark emergency supplies with Braille labels or large print. Keep a list of your emergency supplies and where you bought them on a portable flash drive or make an audio file that is kept in a safe place where you can access it.
• Keep a Braille or deaf-blind communications device as part of your emergency supply kit.
Tips for people with speech disability:
• If you use an augmentative communications device or other assistive technologies plan how you will evacuate with the devices or how you will replace equipment if it is lost or destroyed. Keep model information and note where the equipment came from (Medicaid, Medicare, private insurance, etc.).
• Plan how you will communicate with others if your equipment is not working, including laminated cards with phrases and/or pictogram.
Tips for people with a mobility disability
• If you use a power wheelchair, have a lightweight manual chair available as a backup if possible. Know the size and weight of your wheelchair in addition to whether or not it is collapsible, in case it has to be transported.
• Show others how to operate your wheelchair.
• Purchase an extra battery for a power wheelchair or other battery-operated medical or assistive technology devices. If you can’t purchase an extra battery, find out what agencies, organizations or local charitable groups can help you buy one. Keep extra batteries on a trickle charger at all times.
• Consider keeping a patch kit or can of sealant for flat tires and/or extra inner tube if wheelchair or scooter is not puncture proof.
• Keep an extra mobility device such as a cane or walker if you use one.
• If you use a seat cushion to protect your skin or maintain your balance and you must evacuate without your wheelchair, take your cushion with you.
Tips for people who need behavioral support
• Plan for people who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), who may have difficulty in unfamiliar or chaotic environments. This may include:
-Handheld electronic devices (loaded with movies and games)
-Spare chargers
-Sheets and twine or a small pop up tent (to decrease visual stimulation in a busy room or to provide instant privacy)
-Headphones (to decrease auditory distractions)
-Comfort snacks
-Toys (to meet needs for stimulation)
Additional Items
-At least a week-long supply of prescription medicines
-A list of all medications, dosage and any allergies
-Extra eyeglasses
-Extra hearing-aid batteries
-Extra wheelchair batteries (or a manual wheelchair if possible)
-Oxygen
-A list of the style and serial number of medical devices (include special instructions for operating your equipment if needed)
-Copies of medical insurance and Medicare cards
-Contact information for doctors, relatives or friends who should be notified if you are hurt
-Pet food, extra water, collar with ID tag, medical records and other supplies for your service animal
—from the Federal Emergency Management Agency

Northgate Road and Pedestrian Gate closed
North Gate Road will be closed until further notice due to sewer construction that is part of the OC 405 Partners Project.
The pedestrian gate that exits Leisure World from Northwood Road to North Gate Road will be closed as well.
An eight-foot fence will be installed just east of the Frontier building during the project to replace a sewer line on North Gate Road.
The work is related to the Orange County Transportation Authority’s 405 Freeway Improvement Project, which is also overseeingthe removal of a sound wall on North Gate Road. K-rail has been placed, but that project is on hold until further notice.
The sewer project will start Monday using standard jack and bore construction. Work will be conducted on weekdays and may be loud.
Construction crews will drill a hole underground horizontally between two points without disturbing the surface between sending and receiving pits.
The tool works like a jack hammer and uses air to pound its way through the ground.
The equipment is loud and causes vibration that people may feel if they are close enough.
The operation will be complete Sept. 1.

FALW celebrates vets
The Filipino Association of Leisure World could not hold its annaul Fourth of July picnic to honor veterans this year because of the COVID-19 shut-downs.
But the group found a creative way to make vets living in Leisure World feel special with a gift of lap robes and masks imprinted with each honoree’s branch of military service.
“It was so special,” said Joan Shramek, the wife of U.S. Navy vet Frank Shramek. “FALW members made face masks, each with a military designation, on it. Frank’s was the U.S. Navy. And the lap robe came in a nice carrier.” FALW President Ren Villanueva hand-delivered the gifts to the Shrameks.
He was joined by Ric Dizon in delivering the gifts to the home of every registered veteran in LW. Among those who helped with the project were FALW members Bernie and Martha Goossens, who made the face masks.
The vets expressed their thanks and loved seeing emblems of their service branch on the face masks. Two of LW’s oldest veterans, both 96 years old, are James Kasper of Mutual 15, who was a bombardier-gunner in the European Theater, and Morton Goldberg of Mutual 14, who was an infantryman in the Pacific Theater and helped liberate the city of Manila.
“They are members of the greatest generation of men,” said Villanueva, who was grateful to find a way to honor LW vets this year amid the COVID-19 shut-downs. “We will always remember their sacrifices rendered to a great nation.”

City of Seal Beach Senior Resource
The City of Seal Beach has launched SeniorCityzen, a senior resource started to support and check in with seniors who are socially isolated as a result of the COVID-19 stay-at-home orders.
The resource allows Seal Beach seniors to connect with city staff (volunteers) who may schedule a call to receive regular check-ins via telephone to chat and/or to receive referrals to community resources during this difficult time.
To participate, email SeniorCityzen@sealbeachca.gov or call (562) 431-2527, ext. 1600. Seniors are asked to leave their name and phone number, and staff will return their email/call to set up a chat and/or answer any senior-resource related questions.
SeniorCitizen is designed for people 60 and above who are facing social isolation and are looking for someone to talk to, along with getting referrals to other senior-centric organizations.
For more information about SeniorCityzen, contact Assistant City Manager Patrick Gallegos at pgallegos@sealbeachca.gov or (562) 431-2527, ext. 1308.

CAP Food Distribution Today
Free food is available in Leisure World to eligible residents who are 60 years or older through Community Action Partnership of Orange County (CAPOC), which has a monthly distribution site by Clubhouse 4.
The next food distribution will be July 16.
Every third Thursday from 9-11 a.m., qualified people receive 40 pounds of food, including canned fruit, vegetables, meat, rice, juice, cereal and more.
Eligible seniors must live in Leisure World, be at least 60 years of age and meet income guidelines as follows: up to $1,354 a month for one person; $1,832 for a two-person household; and $2,311 for a three-person household. To sign up, bring a photo ID, and proof of income (Social Security/SSI Statement, letter or bank statement or paycheck stub).
For more information or to arrange a proxy to pick up food, call GRF Member Resource Liaison Cindy Tostado at 431-6586, ext. 317.

Grocery delivery coming to LW
Globally Delicious Burgers in Long Beach has created a grocery delivery service whereby LW residents can place their orders from an extensive list of goods online and have them delivered here weekly for pickup outside Clubhouse 4.
This will be a drive-up service, much like the monthly Orange County one but with no qualifications or requirements. In addition, they offer prepackaged meals a cut above the typical.
“GDBRO Burger, a globally-conscious brand, is pleased to announce the launch of its Global Market Kitchen (GMK) especially tailored to the needs of the Leisure World community,” said owner Hue Nguyen. “Starting today, July 16, residents will have an option to order their groceries and household needs and healthy meal kits from the safety of their homes with free weekly delivery. We are excited and grateful to serve your community.”
To ensure a smooth execution and long-term success of the program, a limited number of orders will be accepted the first week. Residents interested in trying out the program should place their orders as soon as possible as this will be first-come, first-served. Orders will be accepted until July 24 for this initial launch and will be delivered to Clubhouse 4 on Thursday, July 30. Residents can start their order now by accessing an easy-to-navigate website at https://squareup.com/store/GDBROGMK/ or calling (562) 661-9776.
The GDBRO Burger was started by a former Wall Street executive who believes in giving back to the community. Its “Cook to Chef” apprentice program prepares at-risk young adults to become caterers in the culinary and hospitality industries. The company offers creative meals of many cuisines, Greek, Korean, Italian and down-home southern fare. The company recently received a substantial donation from a large software company that it plans to direct toward programs benefitting 10 local communities that have been impacted by coronavirus restrictions.
Currently, it is working on a free meal giveaway to 200 lucky shareholder/members to kick off its relationship in Leisure World.
Look for vendor updates in the LW Weekly and menus by LW Live, the LW Live email blast that keeps residents in the know, as well as further details on current food services offered.
For more information, contact kathyt@lwsb.com or the vendor at gdbrox@gmail.com.
—Kathy Thayer, assistant recreation manager

WNV Update
The Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District (OCMVCD/District) has confirmed that mosquito samples in three cities have tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV).
These are the first samples to test positive in the county this year.
The positive mosquitoes were collected on July 7 in Cypress at Cerritos Avenue and Lexington Drive, in Anaheim at E. Sycamore and East streets, and in Garden Grove at Garden Grove Boulevard and Stafford Street.
The District has also confirmed that one dead bird with WNV was collected in Irvine.
“West Nile virus positive mosquito samples indicates that the virus is active in Orange County and there is an increased risk for residents to become infected with WNV through a mosquito bite.” Said Robert Cummings, Director of Scientific Services.
West Nile virus is most commonly spread to people by the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds. There are no confirmed cases of human infections currently in Orange County.
The Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District staff will continue to conduct surveillance, inspections, and control measures for mosquitoes in the areas to prevent additional mosquito breeding.
OCMVCD will post WNV advisory signs alerting residents of high WNV activity in the affected areas.
OCMVCD is routinely in Leisure World to treat and test Leisure World’s flood channel for mosquito larvae.
Mosquitoes are largely aquatic with most of their development occurring in or near stagnant water.
“It is essential for residents to do their part and take charge of their yard,” said Lora Young, director of communications. “The best way to protect yourself is by applying EPA-registered repellent, wearing long sleeved clothing and eliminating potential breeding sources around your property.”
WNV is the leading cause of mosquito-borne disease in the continental United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control.
Cases of WNV occur during mosquito season, which starts in the summer and continues through fall. There are no vaccines to prevent or medications to treat WNV in people. Fortunately, most people infected with WNV do not feel sick. About 1 in 5 people who are infected develop a fever and other symptoms. About 1 out of 150 infected people develop a serious, sometimes fatal, illness. You can reduce your risk of WNV by using insect repellent and wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants to prevent mosquito bites.
To learn more about West Nile virus, visit www.ocvector.org/west-nile-virus.
For more information on how you can help reduce the risk of WNV in your community, visit www.ocvector.org.
—from the OCMVCD

Deadly disease for rabbits confirmed in county
On May 11, rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus serotype-2 (RHDV2) was confirmed in a wild black-tailed jackrabbit collected from an area where over 10 dead jackrabbits were found near Palm Springs, Riverside county, according to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Since this initial report RHDV2 has been confirmed in the following California counties: Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego.
This highly infectious virus affects domestic and wild lagomorphs (members of the rabbit family).
RHDV2 can spread quickly and can cause high mortality in affected rabbit populations.
To date, RHDV2 has only been detected in domestic rabbits, wild cottontails and jackrabbits, but all lagomorph species may be susceptible.
The virus poses no risk to humans or other animals. RHDV2 is spread through contact between infected rabbits, their meat or fur, respiratory fluids, urine, feces, contaminated soil or materials in contact with those items. It can be easily spread to new areas by moving rabbits or contaminated items, and on shoes or clothing. It may also be spread by insects and scavengers after contact with sick or dead rabbits.
The Department of Fish and Wildlife is tracking the geographic spread and impact of RHDV2 on wild rabbits, jackrabbits and hares. Rabbits with RHDV2 may die quickly after infection. Blood may be present at the nose or mouth of the animal.
Help us monitor this new wildlife disease in California:
• Report sick or dead wild rabbits (two or more) found in an area over a short period of time (3-4 days apart).
• Do not handle the carcasses.
Domestic rabbit owners who have a sick rabbit should contact their veterinarian.
If rabbits are found dead, contact Long Beach Animal Care Services at (562) 570-7387 (the City of Seal Beach contracts with City of Long Beach Animal Care Services for animal control services).
—from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Perspectives Page 4
Member Column
by Jim Greer
LW contributor

“Undisturbed calmness of mind is attained by cultivating friendliness toward the happy, compassion for the unhappy, delight in the virtuous, and indifference toward the wicked.” This wisdom from the ancient Indian sage Patanjali is the perfect starting point for relieving the stress we have all been feeling during the past six months.
The combination of political, societal and public health upheaval seems to be too much to handle. Fortunately, Patanjali’s phrase, “indifference toward the wicked,” permits us to dismiss expressions of intolerance and divisiveness out of hand. When we sense the negative effect of abrasive opinions, we are free to reject them and not let them infringe on our emotional well-being.
In dealing with the pandemic, what were once routine tasks or pleasures are thwarted by increased tension and anxiety. But there are drug-free forms of relief out there we all can employ. For centuries, forms of meditation have improved outlook and enhanced coping skills in people of all ages.
For many of us, meditation may seem like a foreign practice. In actuality, many of us have been meditating as part of our religious culture for years. The recitation of prayers or Scripture and music in our services are forms of meditation that prepare us for and assist us in our worship.
In her June 22, 2018, US News & World Report article “The Many Benefits of Meditation for Older Adults,” Heidi Godman shared valuable information to help manage anxiety. Godman shared advice based on the research findings of UC San Francisco’s Dr. Stephanie Cheng. “When you meditate, in general, the breath slows down, heart rate slows, blood pressure decreases, stress decreases, digestive function improves, and the sense of tension in the body decreases.”
Cheng goes on to explain that meditation decreases blood pressure and inflammation. It even improves coronary artery disease and helps with post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain and headaches.
Meditation has also helped with reductions in irritable bowel symptoms, depression, anxiety and insomnia. Additional research shows benefit for older adults, including:
• Enhanced short- and long-term memory.
• Alleviated struggles with memory and cognition.
• Improved circulation and oxygen in the blood.
• Decreased stress and increased calming, enabling organized thinking and a clearer perspective.
• Improved focus and sharper minds.
• Reduced feelings of isolation.
Many of Dr. Cheng’s patients experience a reduction in the need for medications as blood pressure, stress and depression decrease. They experience greater well-being, increased peace and quality of life. And perhaps the most important benefit of meditation for those who practice is a recognition of blessings and abundance in their lives, increasing gratitude for what they have. Whether you practice meditation or just mind-body exercises (such as tai chi, qigong, or yoga), these techniques can bring undisturbed calmness of mind. The more frequently you meditate, the more benefit you and those around you receive. This realization is what Patanjali was eluding to when he suggested “cultivating friendliness toward the happy, compassion for the unhappy, delight in the virtuous.” These affirmations provide an “undisturbed calmness of mind.”

Letter to the Editor
Editor:
It has been a long seven months since the pool and spa complex were closed to the membership for a remodel.
How long after the Board of Directors approved the new design plans and a sizeable price tag does it take to get this project off the ground and get started? This pool is used by more than 2,000 shareholders monthly and should be a priority for management to get finished.
Other projects, like the 10,000-square feet multifunctional fitness center seem to have precedence over the pool and spa complex.
As a longtime shareholder of this community, I am asking management to start construction of this project ASAP without any more delays.
This communityis in need of a pool-spa to help all members maintain a healthy lifestyle.
E. Furlong Swenson
Mutual 12
Editor’s note: The pool, which is expected to reopen in late September, was closed late last year for a remodel that mushroomed into a complete redesign after foundation and infrastructure defects were uncovered as work began. Plans had to be redrawn and permits applied for amid slow-downs triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, hence the unanticipated delay in project completion. See story on page 1, July 9 edition, for a complete update.

Watch Your Step
A Leisure World resident reported that a scammer purporting to be from the Social Security Office called and left her an alarming message about owing money.
She did not return the call but wanted her LW neighbors to know the scam is circulating again.
It is estimated that older adults lose billions of dollars to scammers each year. But there is good news—last year the Federal Trade Commission noted that older consumers are more likely to report they’ve been victimized by financial exploitation than their younger counterparts. And that’s a move in the right direction.
Here are three scams that are making the rounds right now:
• Social Security Spoofing Calls
There’s been a significant uptick in fraudulent telephone calls from people claiming to represent the Social Security Administration (SSA). In them, unknown callers threaten victims that they face arrest or other legal action if they fail to call a provided phone number or press the number indicated in the message to address the issue. Sometimes the scammers switch tactics and say that they want to help an individual activate a suspended Social Security number. They may even “spoof” the actual Social Security hotline number to appear on the recipient’s phone: 1-800-772-1213.
If you receive one of these calls, hang up. Know that Social Security rarely contacts persons by phone unless you have ongoing business with them and they never make threats about arrest or legal action.
Report suspicious calls to the SSA Office of the Inspector General by calling 1-800-269-0271 or submitting a report on the OIG website.

Security Column
For the second time, one of Mutual 2’s new welcome signs has been vandalized. Over the July 4th weekend, someone defaced the sign with black spray paint. Over the Memorial Day weekend, someone threw eggs on it.
“We don’t know who did this, or why, but it is still tragic and frightening that someone in our community finds this sort of behavior satisfying,” according to a Mutual 2 director (whose name is witheld because he is running for a seat in Mutual 2 and is subject to a candidates’ blackout per GRF policy. The blackout ends after elections).
“It could be a disgruntled shareholder or maybe an immature teenager visiting ‘grandma’ over a holiday weekend. And, of course, we are concerned that this may possibly happen again. We do have options to protect our property: Security patrols, cameras, anti-graffiti solutions and more. But I think our most effective defense is for all Leisure World shareholders to keep their eyes and ears open whenever possible, and to call our Security if unusual activity is seen in our mutual neighborhoods,” the director said.
Security Service Director Victor Rocha agrees: “We are very fortunate that the security issues and calls for service that do arise in the community are a modest amount of petty thefts, vandalism and noise complaints.
“We want to continue to minimize issues and concerns before they can grow into larger problems,” he said.
To that end, he encourages everyone to report suspicious activity.
“We all share a common goal of protecting our community,” Rocha said. “We are asking for everyone’s assistance to report any suspicious activity immediately to the Security Department. The extra set of ‘eyes’ you provide in the community is essential to the safety and security for all residents. If you believe a crime is occurring, do not hesitate to contact the Seal Beach Police Department immediately.
“Please remember that you can remain anonymous. No names are necessary, we just want people to report the suspicious activity.”
Security can be reached at (562) 431-6586, ext 375. The non-emergency number for the Seal Beach Police Department is (562) 799-4100; if it’s an emergency, dial 9-1-1.
Director Rocha thanks everyone for “assisting us in making the community safe and secure.”

Government Page 5
GRF Committee Meetings
Golden Rain Foundation committee and board meetings are open to Leisure World residents. The following is a tentative schedule (meetings are dependent on orders related to COVID-19; check schedules for latest information). Strict public health and safety measures will be in place to protect membership and staff, there will be limited in-person seating at Clubhouse 4.  Physical distancing and wearing a face mask will be required:

Fri., July 17 Architecture Design Review Committee
CH 4/Zoom/live stream 10 a.m.
Mon., July 20 Finance Committee
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/live stream 10 a.m.
Tues., July 21 Website Ad Hoc Committee
Zoom 1 p.m.
Tues., July 28 GRF Monthly Meeting
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/live stream 10 a.m.
Tues., Aug. 4 Special GRF Board (election/ballot counting)
Clubhouse 4, Zoom, live stream 10 a.m.
Tues., Aug. 4 GRF Annual Meeting
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/live stream 10:45 a.m.
Tues., Aug. 4 Special GRF Board Meeting (election/ballot counting)
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/live steam 1 p.m.
(announcement of election results)
Tues., Aug. 4 Special GRF BOD (election of officers)
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/livestream 1:30 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 7 Special GRF Board Meeting
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/livestream 1 p.m.
Fri., Aug. 7 GRF Board Executive Session
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/livestream TBD
Mon., Aug. 17 Special GRF Board Meeting
Clubhouse 4/Zoom/livestream 9 a.m.

Mutual Meetings
Mutual residents are invited to attend the open meetings of their mutual boards (schedule subject to change).

Thurs., July 16 Mutual 2
Zoom conference call 9 a.m.
Thurs., July 16 Mutual 11
canceled 1:30 p.m.
Mon., July 20 Mutual 15
Zoom conference call 1 p.m.
Tues., July 21 Mutual 14
Zoom conference call 1 p.m.
Wed., July 22 Mutual 10
canceled 9 a.m.
Thurs., July 23 Mutual 1, open forum, 9 a.m.
Zoom conference call 9:15 a.m.
Fri., July 24 Mutual 6
canceled 9:30 a.m.

GRF Executive Board Meeting
GRF Board
Executive Session
1 p.m.,
Friday, July 17, 2020
Virtual Meeting,
in accordance with
applicable codes

NOTE: This meeting is closed to Shareholders/Members per Civil Code §4935

A. Call to Order
President Linda Stone
B. Roll Call
C. Legal
D. Contracts
E. Personnel
F. Personnel
G. Adjournment

Agenda is subject to change.

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING
OF MEMBERS OF THE
GOLDEN RAIN
FOUNDATION

Foundation members are advised that there will be limited seating at the Golden Rain Foundation Annual Meeting of the Members on Tuesday, Aug. 4, at 10:45 a.m. in Clubhouse 4. Members are encouraged to view the meeting via the live stream link on lwsb.com.
Remember to complete the “What is Your Question?” form (at right), to submit a question or comment to the Board during the Annual Meeting.
Suzanne Fekjar,
Corporate Secretary
Golden Rain Foundation Board of Directors

Carport Cleaning Schedule
The remainder of the holiday carport cleaning schedule for 2020 is as follows:
Labor Day – Monday, Sept. 7
Mutual 1, Carports 1-6, 9-10, and Mutual 17, Building 3, will be cleaned Monday, Aug. 31.
Veterans Day – Wednesday, Nov. 11
Mutual 3, Carports 39-42, and Mutual 4, Carports 54-56, will be cleaned Friday, Oct. 30.

Arts Pages 10-15
Grab and Go Schedule
July 16-22
Clubhouse 6 Parking Lot

• Thursday: Domino’s Pizza – Call ahead for special orders; wings and salads offered; 3-7 p.m., cash/cards, (562) 493-2212; Mandi’s Candies Ice Cream Truck, 4-7 p.m.
• Friday: Katella Deli, NEW DAY AND TIME; extensive menu—appetizers, salads, hot entrees, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Call ahead at (562) 594-8611 or order online www.katellabakery.com, specials of the day available onsite, cash/cards.
• Saturday: Lucille’s Smokehouse, barbecue, salads, sandwiches; no pre-orders, just show up between 4-6 p.m.
•Sunday: Berg Catering—Freshly prepared meals with a healthy gourmet touch, 3:30-5:30 p.m., pre-order at (562) 663-2038 or online at www.bergcatering.com (LW Menu) or buy onsite, PayPal, checks, cash, cards.
• Monday: Kabobaholic Food Truck – Chicken or meat kabobs, Gyros, Falafel, loaded fries, 4-6 p.m., www.kabobaholicft.com or text (949) 400-4696 for preorders or buy onsite. Mention LWSB, cash/cards.
• Tuesday: Taco Tuesday—Mexican favorites plus hot dogs, burgers and fries, 5-7 p.m., cash/cards, no pre-orders.
• Wednesday: Gourmet Renee—American cuisine, homemade soups and desserts, 4-6 p.m., pre-order by calling (323) 833-1213; cash/cards
•••
All Grab ‘n’ Go events will take place, rain or shine. If it rains or is too hot, people line up inside Clubhouse 6. People should keep a six-foot distance and wear a mask. For information, call (562) 431-6586, ext. 398.
On-call bus service available from 4:30 p.m. when regular service ends. Call (562) 431-6586, ext. 379.
For more information or to make a suggestion, call (562) 431-6586, ext. 379.
Watch for LW Live! alerts for daily menus. Sign up for LW Live at http://www.lwsb.com/lw-live-sign-up/.

Family Radio Service Drills
Calling all Family Radio Service Users in Leisure World—the Radio Club provides an opportunity for a Family Radio Service (FRS) practice drill every Wednesday morning. Anyone who has an FRS radio is invited to participate. Use the following guidelines.
• Call-in time is from 9:30-9:45 a.m.
• Use Channel 13/0.
• Be sure to wait until the radio is clear and call in stating your first name, last name initial and mutual, example “John S., Mutual 13, checking in.” Remember to press the side button to speak and release when finished.
If you are not sure how to call in and would like additional instruction on use of the FRS radio, contact Leisure World Radio Club President Rich Erickson, rjerxn@yahoo.com, or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 409, to leave a message.

Video Producers
The Video Producers Club is offering free weekly Zoom classes at 10 a.m. and a Zoom Party Social on Saturday at 5 p.m.
Classes are as follows:
•Monday, 10 a.m., intermediate Zoom class for Windows and Android users with Joe Osuna, host. For an invite to his class, email joosuna29a@gmail.com.
•Monday, 2 p.m., Zoom class for iPad and Mac users with Fred Carpenter, host. For an invite to his class, email sail1942@gmail.com.
•Wednesday, 10 a.m., beginners Zoom class Windows and Android users with Joe Osuna, host. For an invite to his class, email joosuna29a@gmail.com.
• Thursday, 10 a.m., beginner’s Zoom class for Windows and Android users and for beginning Video Producers with Joseph Valentinetti, host. For an invite to his class, email 0501042@gmail.com.
•Friday, 10 a.m., guest lecturer Bob Cohen in Friday Morning Tech Talk; learn more about technology each week. Email bob@bobology.com for an invite or visit the calendar at www.bobology.com.
• Saturdays, 5 p.m., Zoom Party Social, hour open to all residents, hosted by Joseph Valentinetti. For an invite to the party, email 0501042@gmail.com.

Balance and Stability Class
A Landmark Balance and Stability class is offered on Saturdays from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. on Zoom
The instructor teaches the free 40-minute class that focuses on balance, shifting weight and cognizant activities.
She is certified in Zumba, Zumba Gold, Silver Sneakers, and Balance & Stability.
She also has certification from the Fitness Aging Institute and a ACE Group exercise certificate.
To join a class, email her at arosenfeld1@verizon.net, and she will send you the link to join to group.
Or people can join the Zoom meeting by visiting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84982522530; the Meeting ID is 849 8252 2530.

Aquarium of the Pacific Outdoor Displays
Sharks and rays have been on the planet since before the time of dinosaurs. Since then, they have continued to play an important role in maintaining ocean health.
You can visit, learn about and touch sharks and rays at the Aquarium’s outdoor areas with advance reservations and with safety protocols in place, including required facial coverings (ages 2 and up), temperature checks, timed entries, plentiful hand sanitizing stations and more.
The Aquarium’s Shark Lagoon, Ray Touchpool and other outdoor exhibits have a $12 admission per person (indoor exhibits are currently closed through July 24).
Visitors can get up close to sharks and rays in Shark Lagoon, including smaller sharks and rays they can touch in the touch pools and bigger sharks and rays that are on view in the large Shark Lagoon exhibit, including a sand tiger shark, zebra shark, and a massive 300-pound reticulate whipray. The Aquarium’s Ray Touchpool on the California Terrace features bat rays.
The Aquarium of the Pacific is located at 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach.
With many kids and adults staying at home, the Aquarium offers an Online Academy with daily live and on-demand content. In addition to daily live classes, exhibit webcams and other fun and educational content, the Aquarium is offering its Guest Speaker Series. You can visit the Aquarium’s website or follow its social media channels for live feeds and updates.
A schedule and links to these resources can be found on the Aquarium’s Online Academy webpage.
The Aquarium is home to more than 12,000 animals, Aquarium exhibits include Pacific Visions, the Molina Animal Care Center, and the new Coral Reefs: Nature’s Underwater Cities exhibition.
Visit the Aquarium’s website for the online academy and other educational features, the latest information on programs and displays, and to make reservations at aquariumofpacific.org or call (562) 590-3100.
The Aquarium is the fourth most-attended aquarium in the nation. It displays 12,000 animals and more than 100 exhibits that celebrate the planet’s largest and most diverse body of water, the Pacific Ocean, the Northern Pacific, the temperate Southern California/Baja region, and the warm coral reefs and lagoons of the Tropical Pacific.

Virtual races will be held
The Jewish Family and Children’s Service of Long Beach/West Orange County, Meals on Wheels of Long Beach, and U.S.VETS-Long Beach have continued their work on the 2nd annual Long Beach Trifecta.
The Long Beach Trifecta is a series of 5K/10K walks/runs/rolls held for charitable purposes, with one event for each organization. Participants in all three events qualify for an exclusive commemorative medal and recognition by the Long Beach Trifecta.
The COVID-19 pandemic posed a number of challenges to this event.
However, all of the organizations involved adapted to these difficulties. Instead of being held in public, the races are being done virtually, with participants walking, running, or rolling routes of their choosing and using a phone app to keep track of the number of miles traversed.
JFCS of Long Beach and West Orange County and U.S.VETS-Long Beach have both held their races, and reported that 356 participants ran and raised over $124,000 that will service people in the community.
This was all done virtually, with an emphasis on maintaining social distance and other safety measures.
Meals on Wheels of Long Beach is now holding its “Virtual Race” during the entire month of July.
This way, participants can race at the time and place of their choosing. This allows more flexibility for those who would like to run, walk or roll and extends the window of opportunity for involvement.
This race, like the others, will be open to anyone who is interested. Upon successfully completing a race, each participant will receive a commemorative race t-shirt.
Registering for an individual race costs $35, but there are no fees beyond that.
Those who want to take part in the Meals on Wheels of Long Beach 5K/10K RUN, WALK & ROLL “Virtual” event can register by visiting www.mowlb.org.
For more information on this event or previous races, contact (562) 439-5000, ext “0” or email her at rhonda@mowlb.org.

Friday Tech Talk
Join Bob Cohen for a one-hour Zoom class on a technology topic every Friday at 10 a.m. On July 24 the topic will be “Organizing Files on Windows and Macs.” To register, contact bob@bobology.com.

All About Podcasts
The days are long and entertainment is mostly remote and digital these days. Along with TV and talk radio, it’s a perfect time to explore the world of podcasts. Simply put, a podcast is an audio program, similar to talk radio, but you subscribe to it on your smartphone and listen to it whenever you like.
Podcasts give you a lot more control. They are a series of audio episodes, all focused on a particular topic or theme, like the latest in politics, interviews with favorite celebrities, serial dramas, true crime, book reviews or economics. The list is endless.
All of this programming is available for free; just install an app on your phone and download the shows you want to hear.
The first step is to pick a podcast player. Here are four suggestions that will get you in the door and straight to listening.
Apple Podcasts
If you have an iPhone, this app comes built into your phone. It might not have the biggest feature set, but it offers a quick and easy way to jump into the world of podcasts. It lacks the more powerful features found in other players like “voice boost” (which is great for listening in loud environments like a subway train or an airplane) and the ability to skip silence in a podcast. However, you can stream and download shows, skip ahead or rewind in 15-second intervals, and set your favorite shows to download automatically as soon as a new episode is released, free
Google Play Music
If you’re on Android, Google’s music streaming app, which comes pre-installed on your phone, also supports podcasts. Like Apple’s Podcasts app, Google Play takes a simplistic approach to podcasts. It lets you subscribe to podcasts, download episodes, and skip and rewind during playback. However, there’s also a version of the app that runs in the web browser, so you can listen from your computer when you’re at your desk and save your phone’s battery, free.
Spotify
Spotify’s mainly known as a music streaming service, but in 2015, the company added support for podcasts. Again, you’ll just get the basics, but that’s enough to get you started. If you’re a regular Spotify user already, this option gives you a podcast player with a familiar interface. As a bonus, you can flip between podcast episodes and your usual songs and playlists, so you never have to switch apps to listen to something different. There are a couple caveats, though: Spotify hand-picks which podcasts are allowed on its platform, so it may not have everything you’re looking for, and without a premium subscription you’ll have to listen to ads between episodes, free.
Now Find Something
to Listen to
Every podcast app has a section filled with recommended shows you can browse. Start there. Some apps have better suggestions than others, but at least you’ll be able to find a few things you might like. When you find a show you’re sure you’ll enjoy, subscribe to it—this adds the title to your list of favorites in the app. If you want, you can set up your app to download each new episodes as soon as it’s released. Most apps will also let you listen to an episode of any podcast without subscribing, so test out as many shows as you want.
Examples of a Popular Podcasts
With more than a million podcasts out there, you will have no trouble finding some to interest you. Here are a few favorites:
• Serial: This award-winning podcast blends investigative journalism with non-fiction storytelling and tells one story—a true story—over the course of a season.
• This American Life: It is the most popular podcast in the United States, with around one million people downloading each episode.
• Dr. Death: Reported and hosted by reporter Laura Beil, Dr. Death is a story about a charming neurosurgeon surgeon, 33 patients, and a spineless system.
• Radiolab: A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab describes itself as “a patchwork of people, sounds, stories and experiences centered around One Big Idea.”
• Stuff You Should Know: Listen to Josh Clark and Chuck Bryant explore everything from genes to the Galapagos in this podcast from HowStuffWorks.com.
• S-Town: S-Town is a new podcast from Serial and This American Life, hosted by Brian Reed, about a man named John who despises his Alabama town and decides to do something about it.
• Planet Money from NPR: From the producers of This American Life, Planet Money describes itself as a fun evening with a friend discussing the economy.
• TED Talks Daily: Listen to more than 2,000 TED Talks from remarkable people, including expert speakers on education, business, science, and beyond.
• Talk Easy: Founded in 2016, Talk Easy with Sam Fragoso is a weekly podcast of intimate, long-form interviews with people from all walks of life: filmmakers, comedians, activists, politicians, actors, and once, my mother. The show is hosted by writer/director Sam Fragoso, new episodes every Sunday morning.

Men’s Golf Scores
The Men’s Monday Golf League played on July 6 at the David L. Baker Executive Golf course in Fountain Valley. Nine men, and two women challenged the par 62, 4800-yard 18-hole course. A warm start turned into a sunny and hot morning. Baker has six lakes and large tricky greens. The course is in great shape, which contributed to the low scores and 5 birdies.
All scores are net (actual score minus handicap). A Flight handicaps range from 0-20, B flight higher than 20.
A Flight Winners:
• First Place: Dave LaCascia, 5 under 57 plus 3 birdies and fewest putts; second: Bill McKusky, 3 under 59; third: Fujio Norihiro, 2 under 60 plus a birdie; fourth: Ron Jackson, one under 61; fifth: John Meyer plus a birdie; sixth: Sam Choi.
B Flight Winners:
First Place: Liz Meripol with a nice 9 under 53; second: Bob Munn, 7 under 55 and tie for fewest putts; third: Tom Ross, 1 under 61 plus closest to the pin on the 110-yard par 3 third hole, and tie for fewest putts; fourth: Keiko Sekino; fifth: Lowell Goltra.
On July 10, The Men’s Friday Golf played at Riverview Golf Course in Santa Ana (there was no play on July 3). Ten men and one woman contested the par 70, 5800-yard course. The weather was delightfully sunny and warm, and it was a pleasure to play on such a nice morning. The greens are in particularly good shape. With the major elevation changes plus numerous river crossings the course was a challenge to the competitors. Even so there were 3 birdies and scores were low.
A special challenge was presented to land on the green on the exceedingly difficult 140-yard par 3 fourteenth hole. To reach the fourteenth green requires about 130 yards of carry over a deep ravine and the green is very narrow from front to back. Three players managed to land and stay on the green—Jim, Fujio, and Bill and were appropriately rewarded.
All scores are net (actual score minus handicap)
A Flight Winners:
First Place: tie between Jim Goltra and Gary Stivers, 2 under 69; second: Paul Cose, 1 under 70; tie for third between Fujio Norihiro, Sam Choi, and Bill McKusky, even par 71; fourth: Dave LaCascia. Sam Choi had fewest putts and Fujio, Jim and Sam each had a birdie. Bill McKusky was closest to the pin on the par 3, 150-yard third hole, Paul Cose was closest on the 100-yard par 3 ninth hole.
B Flight Winners:
First Place: Liz Meripol, with a 4 under 67 plus fewest putts; second: Lowell Goltra, 2 over 73; third: Bob Munn; fourth: John Meyer.
On June 29, the Men’s Monday Golf League played at the Willowick Golf Course in Santa Ana. Ten men, and one woman challenged the par 71, 5800-yard 18-hole course. A cool morning turned into a sunny late morning. The course is the longest the League plays with two 500-plus yard par fives. The course and greens are excellent shape.
All scores are net (actual score minus handicap). A Flight handicaps range from 0-20; B flight, higher than 20.
A Flight Winners:
First Place: Bill McKusky, at even par; second: Fujio Norihiro, 2 over 73; third: Sam Choi: 3 over 74; fourth: Dave LaCascia; fifth: John Meyer; sixth: Jerry Hore. Fujio had fewest putts with 25.
B Flight Winners:
First Place: Liz Meripol with a nice 7 under 64; second: Bob Munn, 2 over 73; third: Tom Ross; fourth: Lowell Goltra; fifth: Bill Zurn. Tom Ross had fewest putts with 34.
There were no birdies and closest to the pin on the 150 yard par 3 fourth hole was John Meyer.
Friends, ladies, spouses, and family are all welcome to play and/or join. Both the Monday and Friday Golf Leagues play at four local courses, all within 15 minutes of Leisure World, starting between 7-7:30 a.m., except holidays. The courses are David L. Baker in Fountain Valley, Meadowlark in Huntington Beach, Riverview in Santa Ana and Willowick in Garden Grove.
Club membership is not required. There is a prize pool for each round that players are not obligated to enter. Prizes are awarded for low gross in each flight; two prizes for closest to the pin on par threes; and a prize for the lowest number of putts in each flight. Holes-in-One, although infrequent, are generously rewarded. If interested, contact, Bill McKusky (562) 430-8618 or Dave LaCascia (801) 674-5975.
The Men’s Monday/Friday league is looking for golfers (men and women) to join the league during the local course shutdown. Handicaps can be determined using our local course handicap numbers and adjusted for the longer and more difficult courses outside Leisure World.
— Dave LaCascia

Gentle Flow Yoga
Join Monarch Healthcare and Alignment Healthcare for a virtual Gentle Flow Yoga series via Zoom. Certified yoga instructor Holly Robinson will guide participants through a series of poses and stretches to help feel more at ease. This class is suitable for all levels and abilities. All you need is a mat and an open mind.
Classes will be held from 2-3 p.m. on Mondays, July 20 and July 27.
All Leisure World residents are welcome to attend at no cost.
RSVP for Gentle Flow Yoga by emailing Grecia Nunez, senior ambassador at the Health Care Center, at gnunez@mhealth.com. Include the day you would like to attend and we will send you your Zoom link.

Bike Club
Bored at home? Not getting enough exercise? Join the Leisure Bicyclists Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday at 9 a.m. at the North Gate for a ride to Long Beach, Huntington Beach or Eldorado Park.  Ride at your own safe speed and use any make of bicycle: Treks, recumbents and electric bicycles, etc., are all welcome.
Helmets and safe shoes are a must. Safe distancing and masks are required. Call Mary Romero at (562) 810-4266 for further details.

Dial-A-Ride
The Senior Shopping Shuttle to Ralphs, Target and Sprouts has been canceled until further notice. Dial-A-Ride service will be available for shopping trips to any location within the City of Seal Beach.
Service is available at no cost Monday-Friday, from 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Advance reservations are required by calling (877) 224-8294. To ensure eligibility, contact California Yellow Cab, (714) 427-2555, and ask for Melissa Gomez or Cristina Valle.
Cindy Tostado, GRF member resources and assistance liaison, is available to help people register for the Senior Transportation Service by appointment. To make an appointment, call 431-6586, ext. 317.
Residents will need proof of residency and date of birth to register.
For additional information on the Dial-A-Ride program, contact Iris Lee at Seal Beach City Hall at (562) 431-2527, ext. 1322, ilee@sealbeachca.gov or AskCityHall@sealbeachca.gov.
Other transporation options are available. The Orange County Transit Authority bus service is conveniently offered from the Leisure World Main Gate bus station. The OCTA Route 42/A eastbound makes 13 trips every day from the Main Gate between 7:53 a.m. and 5:47 p.m. to a stop near the Old Ranch (Ralphs/Target) Towne Center shopping areas. Also, the OCTA Route 42/A westbound makes 12 trips every day from the Main Gate between 8:33 a.m. and 5:53 p.m. to the Vons/Pavilions shopping center on Pacific Coast Highway near Main Street in Old Town Seal Beach. An OCTA Senior roundtrip fare is only $1.50.

LW Poetry
This poetry feature showcase original poems by members of the Creative Writers Club of Leisure World and other GRF members.

No Title
I consider those who are in harm’s way:
the brave soldiers and marines
the first responders—firemen, ICE and cops
each one in harm’s way.
But it’s the first day of the year and I am safe.
I kiss the angel on my shoulder
I pray fervently to my GOD
I grasp my rabbit’s foot until my fingers bleed
this clean, new day.
but maybe they gave me the wrong flu shot this year.
maybe I’m at the mercy of a drunken driver.
maybe disastrous genes from my great grandmother lurk in my body.
and I don’t notice the huge airplanes that roar over my safe home hour after hour.
and I don’t see that ice cube that melted on the kitchen floor that could force me to suddenly crash to the floor—splayed, bruised, hip shattered.
and the angel on my shoulder has fled
and my GOD is tending to other things
and the rabbit foot has lost all of its hair.
—Phyllis Poper

This poetry feature showcase original poems by members of the Creative Writers Club of Leisure World and other GRF members.

Happy 4th

Happy July 4th
I say

Happy 4th
Neighbors say to a stranger

Fireworks at north and south shout out
Spirits of founders, pioneers
Faith, brevity, unity of the Nation

A Man covered with tattoos of American flag
Turned around to ask a stranger
Are you American today?

The stranger was silent a second,
then said
Yes, very much so

The man said “me too, my ancestors from Mexico.
I am proud to be American”

Happy 244th Birthday to my beloved Country
The United States of America!

“Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for all”

—Chung Hur, Mutual 3

Sewing Room Open to Make Masks
The GRF is offering the use of the Sewing Room in Clubhouse 3 to make face coverings under strict guidelines:
• Only two people at a time will be permitted in the Sewing Room.
• The hours will be between 8 a.m.-3 p.m. weekdays.
• Mask makers must reserve their time with the Reservations Office by emailing kathyt@lwsb.com.
• Each person will be permitted two hours of sewing machine use per shift unless there are no other reservations.
• If you have not purchased the required sewing kit, GRF will lend one to you.
• People must sign in and sign out with the custodian each time.
• Fifteen minutes between reservation slots are allotted for the custodian to sanitize the touch surfaces.
For more information, call (562) 431-6586, ext. 398.

Food Resources
The Leisure World Recreation Department has compiled the following information on senior grocery hours, grab ’n’ go meals delivered daily onsite and local restaurants that deliver or have curbside pickup.
This information is updated weekly to help people stay home as much as possible during the COVID-19 crisis.
Grocery Store Hours for Seniors
• Gelson’s Market is open from 7-8 a.m. for seniors 65 and older. One caregiver per shopper is permitted, proof of age required.
• Ralph’s is open from 6-7 a.m. for seniors. Traffic is restricted to 50 people at a time so occasionally there are lines. People can order online for store pickup
• Sprouts does not have senior hours but delivers through Instacart or you can order ahead, and store staff will prepare your order for pick-up.
• Trader Joes is open from 8-9 a.m. for people aged 60 and older. The store limits the number of shoppers inside to 50. Lines move quickly and the wait is usually only a few minutes. It is well stocked but limits eggs, milk and paper products; ask if shelves are not stocked.
• Costco is open from 9-10 a.m., Monday-Friday, for members ages 60 and older, and people with disabilities. Guests will not be admitted. Costco delivers through Instacart with store hours from 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
•Target is open on Wednesdays from 8-9 a.m. for seniors only. The store has reduced hours and closes by 9 p.m. daily to deeply clean stores.
• Smart & Final stores are open 30 minutes early, from 7:30-8 a.m. to accommodate seniors 65 and older, those with disabilities and pregnant women. ID may be requested.
• Stater Bros. Market is open from 7-8 a.m. for people 65-plus.
Other Local Food Options
The Farmer’s Market is open at 9 a.m. on Tuesdays at Seal Beach Village parking lot.
The Primrose Restaurant in the same shopping center offers a pop-up mini market daily in the parking lot from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. It offers dairy products, eggs, fresh produce, paper goods and a few sundry items.
Downtown Cafe
The Downtown Café in Building 5 has vending machines that are restocked daily with food and drinks for take-out. Due to social distancing rules, the tables and chairs have been removed to discourage lingering.
Grab n Go Meals
A variety of mobile restaurants are in the Clubhouse 6 parking lot providing to-go meals every evening. For the schedule, see the Arts and Leisure section.
Volunteers Available
A number of volunteers have offered to assist residents with their shopping and errand needs. Contact Recreation for more information by emailing events@lwsb.com or calling (562) 431-6586, ext. 398.

Mastering the Zoom Experience
Although physically you will be in your own home when you take your classes this term, you will be in a classroom online, one that you can’t touch or feel. This is a new environment for almost all of us, but before long you’ll find that it will seem almost routine.
Before Class Starts
• Don’t share your Zoom link or password with anyone. This is an important security rule that helps keeps the classroom safe.
• Make sure your computer, tablet or phone is either fully charged or plugged in during class. Zoom uses a lot of power.
• If you have one, use a headset (or earbuds) instead of speakers and microphones. You will hear a much better quality of sound. Also, speakers and a microphones generate static that others in the class may hear during class.
• Try to find a quiet corner of your home for your class session where you are not likely to be interrupted.
• To look your best, have light shining on your face. If the light source in your room is on your back, the rest of the class won’t be able to see your face clearly.
• If you have a smartphone, turn off notifications, or mute the sound or activate the Do Not Disturb function for the duration of the class.
• Sign into the class at least five minutes before it starts so you can check to make sure your audio and video are working.
• When you do sign in, you may notice yourself in a waiting room. That’s where the students in your class will gather until the instructor lets you in.
During Class
• Your instructor will explain how the class will be conducted. For example, if you have a question, how you can ask it.
• Look into the camera when you speak. We’re used to looking into people’s eyes when we speak to them, but in this case we have to look into the camera so we look like we’re looking into the people’s eyes on the screen. Yes, this takes a little getting used to if your camera isn’t right at eye level.
• If you have to leave your seat to attend to something at home, or if you plan to eat something, please turn off your video.
• Don’t do other things like answering texts or emails during class. Try to give the instructor your full attention.

Health, page 6
Meals on Wheels, Long Beach
Meals on Wheels of Long Beach, Inc. (MOWLB), delivers freshly cooked meals daily, Monday thru Friday, between 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Deliveries include a hot dinner, cold lunch, dessert and 8oz. carton of one percent milk. The cold lunch may be an entree salad or a sandwich with a small side salad. A diabetic dessert is available for those in need. Contact Caron Adler at (562) 439-5000, ext. 2 or visit www.mowlb.org to complete an online application. To cancel a meal for the following day, you must contact Caron before 9 a.m. the prior business day. Menu is subject to change without notice.
Thursday, July 16: Spaghetti with meatballs in marinara sauce, whole grain roll, seasoned broccoli, baked maple pears, turkey and cheese sandwich with lettuce, tomato and pickle, carrot and pineapple slaw.
Friday, July 17: Chicken enchilada with red sauce, black beans, seasoned cauliflower, sugar cookies, entree greek chicken salad, tomoato, olives, cucumber, feta cheese, vinaigrette dressing and crackers.
Monday, July 20: Roasted pork with honey mustard sauce, macaroni and cheese, seasoned brocoli, vanilla pudding, tuna salad sandwich with spinach and tomato, three bean salad, carrot and raisin slaw.
Tuesday, July 21: Turkey tetrazzini brown and wild rice, green beans with pimentos, yogurt with fruit, chinese chicken salad with mandarin oranges, cabbage, carrots, onion, Asian dressing and crackers.
Wednesday, July 22: Beef lasagna, whole grain roll, broccoli and cauliflower, chocolate cake, ham, turkey and cheese sandwich with lettuce, tomato and pickle, beet and onion salad.

OC great plates
Order Kosher Meals on Wheels
Pirchei Kosher is serving through Orange County’s Great Plates program Kosher meal delivery for those who qualify. This is a meal delivery service providing three meals a day for the duration of the program. To enroll, call Pirchei at (949) 215-9995.
Other programs may be available for those who may not be able to qualify for this program. Contact us for more information or visit www.ypsshul.com/kosher.
Those who are over 65 may qualify for the Kosher meal service. This is a limited time program and to enroll you must contact us as soon as possible. Those who are 60-64 and have exposure to COVID-19, may qualify under other categories.
This program is funded in part through a grant from the California Office of Emergency Services, as allocated by the Orange County Board of Supervisors and administered by the Office on Aging.

Optum
Help your community at the next blood drive on July 24
Grecia Nunez
Senior ambassador, HCC

Pandemic or not, there is still a need for blood donations. These donations serve patients in critical need, such as those in surgery or in need of a transfusion. Each quarter, the HCC hosts the American Red Cross blood drive. The next drive will be on Friday, July 24, from 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Here are some things you should know about the upcoming event:
Appointment required. It used to be easy to walk in and donate blood. But now we need to take a few extra precautions to keep you, our neighbors, and the Red Cross employees safe. This year, we are asking that everyone make an appointment to donate. This lets us limit the number of people in the room at a time. It also means no one will be kept waiting. You’ll be in, out, and on your way quickly. You can schedule your Red Cross donation appointment by calling Lisa Love at the Red Cross at (909) 282-6685
Standard precautions apply. A face mask or covering is required. This is for everyone’s safety, including yours. To help make it easier, we’re also leaving the doors to Conference Room 1 open. This way you don’t need to go through the entire clinic. You can walk right in for your appointment.
There are some new safety protocols with COVID-19 as well. The Red Cross will now test each donor’s blood to see if it has antibodies to the virus. As a reminder, not everyone with COVID-19 has symptoms.That makes antibody testing an important new feature of the blood drive. If your donation is negative for antibodies, it can be used for patients in need. The Red Cross will send you the test results through their online portal. There is no cost to you for the testing.
Schedule an appointment with the Red Cross calling (909) 282-6685. Save some time by scheduling through www.RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass, where you can fill out your pre-donation paperwork right through the website.
Lions Club
Free reading glasses available
The Lions Club of Seal Beach has been distributing free reading glasses in Leisure World for the past several weeks. Over 200 pairs of glasses have been handed out to 50 plus residents so far.
There are still readers available with various strengths and an eye chart available in the Leisure World Health Care Center.
The Lions Club also has a collections box in the Health Care Center for any old/used prescription glasses that are no longer needed. The Lions Club recycles these and they are given to folks in need at the Vision Screenings in Southern California and Mexico.
Deliveries are still available by emailing Frank Brown, cbedmotown@yahoo.com or Steve Hollen, commodoresteve@gmail.com.

Religion, 8-9
LW Baptist
By Rolland Coburn
Pastor

God’s word throughout the Bible holds precious promises for his people, regardless of background. Proverbs 3:5-6 holds one of those promises. This is the promise with its condition, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make your paths straight.”
Faith, trusting in God and his word, is the primary condition for the Lord’s guidance, because you cannot trust someone you don’t know. Without faith it is impossible to please God, because whoever comes to God must believe that he is, and that he rewards those who seek him (Hebews 11:6).
Asked who made the moon, our then 2 year old granddaughter first answered, “Daddy,” then “Mama.” We told her Jesus made the moon, as the Bible says in John 1:3,10. She then understood Jesus as the creator, because at each meal with us she gave thanks to Jesus. Faith is taking God at his word because of who he is. When he speaks, we are to respond to him with faith. Believers have God’s spirit; so we may know the things freely given to us by God.
One of those gifts is receiving God’s divine guidance for our lives. Of course we are mostly inclined to lean on our own understanding, as Scripture warns. So we are told to look to the Lord for guidance for everything, not just the big decisions.
Our understanding of God should be informed by Scripture: “Thy Word is a lamp to my feet, a light to my path,” (Psalm 119:105). We need to ask daily for God’s wisdom, nothing doubting, (James 1:5-6). Trust him to adjust your plans according to his will (James 4:15) and look to him to provide for your physical needs: “Give us this day our daily bread.”
Put yourself under his protecting wing: “Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.” Realize that as God’s redeemed child you are under his providential care and intervention. His providence is one complex plan that overrules and disposes all things together for the good of those who love him and are called according to his purpose (Romans 8:28). In other words, his guidance will help you to grow in his grace. So don’t forget to express your appreciation.Thank him, praise him.
Holy Family
Holy Family Catholic Church, 13900 Church Place next to the St. Andrews Gate, will observe The 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time on Sunday, July 19.
Masses
Holy Family Church celebrates Sunday Mass at 8 a.m., 10 a.m. and noon; the Vigil Mass is 5 p.m. Saturday; daily Mass is 8:30 a.m., Monday–Saturday.
Confessions are Saturdays and eves of Holy Days: 4–4:45 p.m. First Fridays start at 9:15 a.m.
Beit HaLev
LWers are invited to Zoom with Beit HaLev! Rabbi Galit Shirah has been conducting livestream services for over four years; this year, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, services are now on Zoom, the video conferencing platform. To receive an invitation as well as the Meeting ID and password, contact Rabbi Galit Shirah at (562) 715-0888 or duets@icloud.com.
Beit HaLev will continue to livestream on Facebook and YouTube as well. To attend, go to galityomtov.com, Facebook.com/galityomtov or YouTube.com (Shabbat Shalom LIVE! channel). Evening services begin at 6 and morning services begin at 10:30.
A link to the PDF version of each prayer book is provided at the start of each service.
Numbers 30:1-31-54 is the double Torah portion, “Matot-Masei.” The book “The Torah, A Woman’s Commentary” (URJ Press) calls the parashah “Matot” “Vows and Vengeance.” The beginning describes various vows, or oaths; women’s vows may be nullified by a husband or a father. The vengeance is against the Midianites, particularly the “perverse” Midianite women who seduced Israelite men and lured them into idolatry. “Masei” is a detailed description of the journeys through the wilderness; the instructions on how the Promised Land was to be allotted; and the five sisters who challenged the laws of inheritance, the Daughters of Zelophechad.
Rabbi Galit Shirah conducts a weekday Ma’ariv service every Thursday for Sim Shalom, the online synagogue. Sim Shalom presents livestream services Monday-Thursday, with a different rabbi each day. To count the Omer, say Kaddish, pray for healing or to hear a spiritual message, go to SimShalom.com.
Rabbi Galit Shirah also teaches online Hebrew (prayerbook and conversational) and Cantillation (Torah chanting) for anyone who wants to learn. Contact the Rabbi at (562) 715-0888 or duets@icloud.com.

Congregation Sholom
Rabbi Rachel Axelrad will stream Friday night services at 6:30 on July 17 on The Congregation Sholom of Leisure World Facebook page. To join, select the “Rooms” tab, then click on “Jewish Activities” and “Join to Restart.” Cantor Marla Barugel will be on Facebook for the Saturday morning services at 9:30 July 18.
On Sunday July 19, Congregation Sholom will have an online game night run by Sandy Gefner starting at 4 p.m. To join, go to Facebook, search for Congregation Sholom, click on rooms, then click on Bingo.
The book club is reading “The Weight of Ink,” by Rachel Kadish. It is a very long book, which is the perfect way to spend time while sheltering in place. The book club will meet on July 21 at 1:30 p.m. in the book club room on the Congregation Sholom Facebook page to discuss. The group will also watch an interview with the author of the next book, “The Book of V,” by Anna Solomon. This book describes the lives of three women, living in different times, who share a common bond.
Congregation Sholom will have a membership drive in August. More information will follow in the weeks to come.
Those who are interested in becoming a member so they can watch the live steam services on Facebook can call Ron Yaffee at (562) 430-7040.
Faith Christian Assembly
Faith Christian Assembly has a Celebration Service every Sunday Evening starting at 5:30 p.m. This one-hour service is a more informal time of worship, led by Pastor Sheri Leming. Due to a drop-off in attendance, many churches cancelled their Sunday evening services. But Faith Christian Assembly found more and more people who value this special time. It’s a great way to end the weekend, and begin a new week. People come early for prayer time starting at 5 p.m.
Out of an abundance of caution, as the church meets in person, all who attend will have their temperature taken at the door, asked to wear a mask and sit socially distant from others. Those who are uncomfortable venturing out can participate in the conference calls during service times. To join, call (425) 436-6371 access code: 576671#.
Due to COVID-19, Faith Christian Assembly is not currently having its regular ministries at this time.
To receive a free newsletter and for more information on the church, call (562) 598-9010 or visit www.FCAchurch.net.

SB Cornerstone Church
In response to growing concerns and state mandates regarding COVID-19, Seal Beach Cornerstone Church is providing an online service every Sunday at 10 a.m.
Anyone is invited to join the service online every Sunday at 10 a.m. on YouTube. The service is in Korean, however, one can use translated captions to worship in other languages.
To join, type in “Seal Beach Cornerstone Church” on YouTube. While physically gathering to worship together in the sanctuary is missed, this online worship helps the well-being of all the members. If you would like to contact Seal Beach Cornerstone Church or Pastor Kang, call (714) 402-9874 or (562) 331-6104.

Community Church
Jesus invited the crowds that came to see him perform miracles to a more personal relationship of following Jesus and doing life as Jesus did. These disciples made a lot of mistakes — we are human and we all do — but they also succeeded in transforming the world. That transformation isn’t a one and done past event. It is a process that we are each still invited to be a part of. Where is God calling for transformation today?
As always, if you are in need without another way to address that need, you may call the church office to leave me a message (562) 431-2503
I invite you to tune into worship Sunday morning at 9:50 on Facebook live, @communitychurchleisureworld. If you don’t have a computer or Facebook, you can still call in to our phone system at (562) 431-2503 and listen to the weekly message beginning Sunday evening as it takes a while to edit and post the audio.

Assembly of God
By Norma Ballinger
LW contributor

Sliver or silver? A sliver causes pain and the area could become infected if not immediately addressed. Silver is a rare and valuable metal; people mine for it and collect coins minted with silver. No coins with silver have been minted since 1965.
By reversing just two letters the meaning of these two words changes radically. Proverbs 25:4 states that when we take away the dross (impurities) from silver the vessel becomes much finer, valuable and beautiful. In the Christian life, “slivers” produce pain, the pain of being ignored, being angry, worrying all the time. This can bring about a great spiritual infection. When we allow God to remove it, our true silver can shine, so our goal is to get the sliver out and have a great day with God. There is no better time for this than now–the pandemic keeps us somewhat isolated and our thoughts could be very helpful for finding the areas of slivers or silver in our life.
Pastor Sam Pawlak continues each Sunday with his Facebook devotion at 10 a.m. and later he videotapes the Sunday service with the help of a few others. These tapes are distributed to members of the congregation and are a good way to stay in touch during this time.

First Christian Church
Let love prevail in our lives
By Bruce Humes
Pastor

Let’s take a look at chapter 12 in the Apostle Paul’s letter to the early church in Rome. Picking up in Romans 12:9, the apostle writes concerning social conduct and traits that should be prevalent in a Christian’s life, not only to those within the body of believers, but also to those in unbelief. Certainly an area that all believers need to pay close attention to is our walk and profession of faith in Christ.
In 1 Timothy 1:5, the apostle Paul put it like this, “Now the purpose of the commandment is love from a pure heart, from a good conscience, and from sincere faith.” The Greek word used in these two verses for love is “agape” meaning affection, benevolence or charity. An unconditional love without boundaries and limits. John used the word agape in John 3:16, when he wrote, “For God so loved (agape) the world that he gave his only begotten son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have everlasting life.” It’s a great example of the love we are to have for fellow believers and those in unbelief as well.
We are to do all of this without hypocrisy, meaning without false pretense or concealing our true thoughts and feelings, and do things from a pure heart, good conscience and sincere (unhypocritical) faith.
The second half of Romans 12:9 says, “Abhor what is evil. Cling to what is good.” Abhor, or utterly detest, what is evil, meaning bad, grievous, harmful, hateful, malicious, wicked, etc., but cling, cleave, glue yourself, to what is good, such as being helpful, kind, generous, or forgiving. These were clear instructions from the apostle Paul to the church in Rome that still apply to us today. We need to heed his words.
Paul goes on to say in verse 10, “Be kindly affectionate to one another (fellow believers, and unbelievers) with brotherly love, (the Greek word here is “philadelphia” meaning fraternal affection, a brotherly sort of love) in honor giving preference to one another.” The verse is telling us to put others before ourselves. Paul tells those Roman Christians and the modern day church to quit worrying so much about ourselves and put others first.
The whole message sounds a lot like the second greatest commandment, “love your neighbor as yourself.” In doing so, we convey the love of Christ not only to fellow believers, but to those in unbelief in a powerful way. However, we will only succeed if we fulfill the first and greatest commandment, which is, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind.”
For any of us to succeed in loving our neighbors as ourselves we must fulfill the first commandment first, for it is from God that we get the power and ability to love others as Christ loved us. The apostle continues in verse 11, “not lagging in diligence (being lazy, falling behind, but) fervent (hot, glowing, boiling) in spirit, serving the Lord.”
Paul’s message to those Roman Christians and to all believers today was let love prevail, avoid hypocrisy, detest evil, seek to do good and don’t be lazy about it, but be on fire for the Lord. A message we (believers) should be paying close attention to in our Christian walk of faith.
If you wish to speak to someone at the church or if you have a need, call the First Christian Church office at (562) 431-8810. Leave a recorded message and someone will return your call as soon as possible.

church of Jesus Christ of Latter day saints
We are not alone in isolation
By Jim Greer
LW Contributor

Recently, Elder Gerrit W. Gong of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles released inspiring advice to help each of us during this time of isolation. He explained that “this era of social distancing has brought a new sense of isolation that many of us never experienced before. I have grown to understand that while we may be physically distant from each other, we do not have to be spiritually distant from Jesus Christ. You and I can use this unique time as an opportunity to hear Him.”
Elder Gong continues to explain that one of the things that he’s felt deeply is the Lord’s voice through the Scriptures. He reminds us that studying the stories and parables of those who feel lost helps us realize the savior’s love for each of us. The parables of the lost coin, the prodigal son, and the lost sheep are excellent examples with which we can identify. Elder Gong felt drawn to a verse in the parable of the prodigal son, where our heavenly father expresses his love for those who feel lost. The Lord says, “For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found” (Luke 15:24).
He emphasized that the first part of the verse refers to our Savior: “For this my son was dead, and is alive again.” Our testimony to the world is that our savior lives. And because he lives, we need never feel lost. The second part of the verse states, “He was lost, and is found.” This promise guarantees each of us that through the Lord’s atonement, we can always be found.
Elder Gong testified that none of us are ever truly lost because Jesus Christ, who once was dead, is alive today. “I find great hope in the assurance that no one is ever lost to the Lord—no matter our circumstances, no matter how alone we may feel, no matter how much we may sense that we cannot connect with the world around us.”
Elder Gong continued by emphasizing the importance of the church’s new symbol launched at the April General Conference. It features the restored name of his church—The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints—in a cornerstone. A reminder that our cornerstone is the living Jesus Christ. In the center of the symbol is Jesus Christ, reaching out to each of us. Jesus is asking, inviting, calling to us in his name and his voice, reminding us that we’re never lost. We’re never alone.
We should remember that the savior is always there. He lives, and He loves us. We can all cherish those “precious and sacred moments we have when we feel the Lord encircling us in his arms of love.”
The new official church symbol is a reminder that we are never truly isolated or alone. We have access to the savior of the world, Jesus Christ. He lives eternally, and so we will always have access to him. “When we come to him, his arms encircle us, his love encircles us, and we are more able to hear him in our lives.”
During this period of social distancing and COVID-19, we can hear the savior call to us, saying, “I see you. I know you. I love you.” Knowing that he sees us, he knows us, and he loves us, we can understand that we are not isolated. We are never alone, so long as we have a knowledge of and a relationship with the living Son of God.

community, page 16-17

LW Anniversary
Jay and Connie Young Celebrate 67 years
Jay and Connie Young were married on July 25, 1953. Jay sometimes wonders how a preacher’s kid, born in Hollywood, California, could marry a farmer’s daughter from South Dakota.
They met at the University of Redlands in 1951. Jay was a star basketball player and Connie was the head song girl and cheerleader. Jay says the success of their marriage can be attributed to Connie insisting they have a dance, hug, kiss and laugh every day.
After they completed their advanced college work and Jay’s tour in the Army during the Korean conflict, they traveled the world together. They have taken their three motor homes to every state with their kids. They have been to 36 National Parks, traveled to 63 counties and have taken 18 cruises. Boating and water skiing were a big part of their lives; going to the Colorado River most holidays and Bass Lake and Lake Shasta during the summers. They have traveled the country playing bridge, and both has achieved Life Master status.
They have three children and six grandchildren and have over 50 years of teaching between them. Jay coached varsity basketball for 30 years at Warren High School in Downey and Connie taught 29 years of first and second grade in Seal Beach. They have lived in Seal Beach since 1959, including 11 years in Leisure World. Jay and Connie are active in the choir and Jay is the vice president of the Art League.
To celebrate their anniversary, they will drive to Laguna Beach where Jay asked Connie to go steady during Easter break in 1952.
Paws, Claws and Beaks
How to Maintian Pet Responsibility
By Bonnie Kaplan
LW contributor

The six-feet leash rule is good for several reasons. It’s important to maintain full control of your pet at all times, after all you are its “parent.”
We all know that animals love to chase and run, but allowing your pet to do that unleashed can cause serious consequences. Loose animals can run into the street and get hit by cars, killed by coyotes or other creatures, injure another animal or a person. Leashing your pet makes it easier to be able to pick up your pet quickly to avoid a run-in with a coyote, raccoon, another loose pet, or person.
When you leash your pet, make sure that it is at an appropriate length. It is difficult to walk with or around someone that has their pet on a longer leash. Accidentally causing another person to trip and fall is so easy when the pet is going back and forth in front of and behind you. Dog parks and backyards are a more appropriate place to let your pet have more freedom.
There are rules and regulations for our pets in Leisure World for a reason. Even the most well trained pets can do something unpredictable at a moments notice. This is why we need to take precautions as pet owners to protect our pets, our neighbors, and not to mention, ourselves.
What is pet responsibility? One simple example is cleaning up after your pet indoors and outside. If it is getting harder for you to care for your pet, it might be time to think about an alternative home for your pet.
Keep your pet’s shots and immunizations up to date. Register and license your pet with Golden Rain and Seal Beach Animal Control, so it can be returned to you if it gets out. Getting your pet ID chipped greatly increases the odds that your pet is returned to you if it escapes from your unit. Leisure World even has tags to put on your pet to identify your mutual. Other ID tags are available for a small fee to identify your pet if it does get lost. Stock Exchange has window decals to place in your window to identify that a pet lives in your unit, for emergency and maintenance purposes. All of these measures protect you, your pet and others.
Here are a few ways you can practice pet responsibility:
Keep your pet out of gardens, patios, and window areas that aren’t your own. Residence privacy is important.
Several folks tend their own gardens and the chemicals may not be safe for your pet. Your pet’s eliminations aren’t safe for residence
to be gardening in either, so for the sake of your pet and the sake of your neighbor’s garden, steer clear of any garden area.
Direct your pet away from the light poles, these are not placed in your mutual for peeing pets to avoid possible maintenance costs for other shareholders.
Always ask if it is all right to pet or touch another pet, keep your face away from the animal’s face and pet under the chin as smelling is important to animals. Avoid putting your hand over the dog’s head to pet it, as you could be bitten.
When introducing your pet, to another, always ask permission to do so, watch the animals to see how they feel about each other. Go slow with introductions and be ready to intervene and pull your pet back, if necessary.
Paws Claws and Beaks is here to give you resources and help with information and support as a social club. We all have to be responsible pet people. If you need information, call (714) 930-5314 (714) 423-8279.
If you are unfamiliar with the rules for LW, please go to the LW website, www.lwsb.com, look under your mutual number, policies and procedures or rules and regulations depending on your mutual and finally under pets.
SBTV Listing
SBTV-3 airs on TWC-Spectrum Channel 3, Frontier Fios Channel 37 and online streaming at sbtv3.org/schedule. Have Roku? Go to http://roku.streamsource.tv/add/sbtv. The playback schedule is available at SBTV3.org.
Thursday, July 16
4 pm Beginning of LW
4:15 pm LW Hula Dance Club
4:30 pm LW Entertainment
4:41 pm Lyon Air Musuem
5 pm Life and Times:
Seal Beach Police Department
6:30 pm The History of Seal Beach
7 pm The Spirit of Seal Beach
7:30 pm World’s Fair Newsreel
7:45 pm Wally Schirra
8 pm On Q—8bit Jazz Heroes
9 pm Cerritos Center-
Matt Mauser
Friday, July 17
4 pm Beginning of Leisure World
4:30 pm Lyon Air Museum
4:45 pm Wally Schirra
5 pm Beginning of Leisure World
5:15 pm LW Hula Dance Club
6 pm Harmonn Islanders
6:30 pm Back to Bourbon Street
7:10 pm Velvetones
8 pm Life and Times:
Seal Beach Police Department
9 pm Cerritos Center-
Golden Dragon Acrobats
10:37 pm Cerritos Center-
The Four Tenors
Saturday, July 18
4 pm Wally Schirra
4:15 pm Lyon Air Museum
4:30 pm Harmonn Islanders
5 pm McGaugh Patriotic Show
5:40 pm McGaugh 1st Grade Show
6:30 pm McGaugh Go West!
7:15 pm Back to Bourbon Street
7 pm LAUSD
10 pm Cerritos Center–
Matt Mauser
Sunday, July 19
4 pm History of Las Vegas Part 1
5 pm History of Las Vegas Part 2
6 pm Aquarium of the Pacific
7 pm Spirit of Seal Beach
7:30 pm History of Seal Beach
8 pm Wally Shirra/Newsreel 1964
8:30 pm Cerritos Center:
Riders in the Sky
10:15 pm Abilene Ampitheater
11:35 pm Bob Cole Conservancy
Monday, July 20
4 pm LW Entertainment
4:15 pm LW Hula Dance Club
5 pm Vintage Vehicles
6 pm McGaugh’s 3rd Grade Show
7 pm SB Planning Committee LIVE
8 pm World’s Fair Newsreel
8:15 pm Beginning of LW
8:30 pm Life and Times:
Seal Beach Police Department
9:30 pm Cerritos Center-
In the Mood
11:40 pm National Parks/Drone Club
Tuesday, July 21
4 pm Beginning of Leisure World
4:15 pm World’s Fair Newsreel 1964
4:30 pm Shelter at Home Entertainment
4:45 pm LW Hula Dance Club
5 pm LW Entertainment
5:15 pm McGaugh – Go West!
7 pm Back to Bourbon Street
7:40 pm Velvetones
8:30 pm Cerritos Center:
Matt Mauser
10:30 pm Bob Cole Conservancy
Wednesday, July 22
4 pm LW’s Special Olmpics
4:15 pm Beginning of Leisure World
4:30 pm World’s Fair Newsreel
4:45 pm Lyon Air Museum
5 pm History of Las Vegas Part 1
6 pm History of Las Vegas Part 2
7 pm Seal Beach City Limits:
Seal Beach Police department
8 pm Cerritos Center:
Golden Dragon Acrobatics
9:37 pm Cerritos Center-
The Four Tenors
11 pm Bob Cole Conservancy
*All programming is subject to change.
PEO
New membership opportunities available
The PEO Leisure World chapter is a philanthropic education organization that is open for new sisters to join the chapter.
PEO was founded in 1869 in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, by seven women who wanted to see the advancement of wmen through scholarships, grants, awards, loans, and stweardship, to motivate women to achieve their highest aspirations.
Those who are interested in hearing more about the group and attending a meeting can call Jan Kuhl at (562) 446-0082; Eileen Dohl at (805) 260-4646; or Marilyn Kane at (562) 296-5595.
Republican club
Club booth returns with social distancing guidelines in place
By Brian Harmon
LW contributor

The grand opening of the Republican Club’s booth on July 6 was a success. Many stopped by to participate in Red, White and Blue Hat Monday, including volunteers who worked in the booth and passersby who stopped for chocolate chip cookies and lively and fun conversation.
The Republican club President said, “It looks like everybody had a great time, and we hope more people can join us next week.”
Anyone who wanted a free mask received one, courtesy of Orange County Board of Supervisors President Michelle Steel, the Republican candidate running for Congress in the upcoming election. Both visitors were also able to purchase a “Michelle Steel for Congress” t-shirt.
The club collected $600 from donations and the selling of hats, shirts and other political campaign merchandise. Twenty-one people registered to vote.
The fun and festivities will continue as the booth will be open every Monday from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. during August so long as the club is able to do so under COVID-19 restrictions.
Michelle Steel is a planned speaker for the Republican Club’s Zoom meeting that is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 12. For more information, contact the Republican Club’s president via email at dharlow50@AOL.com.
During the meeting, Steel will discuss her efforts to prevent defunding the police or the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. She is also currently working on ways to safely open schools, so that children will not fall further behind. As a member of the state board of equalization for eight years, she successfully resisted several attempts to increase taxation.
The Republican Club president announced that next week’s club email will point out some of the problems with the views of both political parties regarding issues such as police brutality, discrimination against African-Americans (both systemic and personal), demonstrations versus riots and other issues.
“I think there is a lot of confusion about some of these issues,” the club president said, “and what I think we need is for both sides to start listening to each other, rather than yelling slogans at one another.”
••••
Last week the Republican Club president’s email address was listed incorrectly. It is dharlow50@AOL.com. The club treasurer’s name is Elsa Gildner.

Vet Care Clinic
Leisure World Community Church, 14000 Church St., is hosting its Vet Care Clinic this morning from 9–11 a.m. The clinic is first-come-first-serve and is a low-cost dog and cat vaccination clinic. Other services such as nail trim, glands, blood work, heart guard, flea and tick medicine will be available. Residents must wear a mask, gloves and stay six feet apart from each other. For more information, contact Elaine Miller at (925) 997-3412

Democratic Club

By Mary Larson
LW Contributor

This week’s report from the Democratic Club focuses on the COVID-19 epidemic as well as the growing call for reform of police departments across the United States.
Experts are now saying that California is a new epicenter of COVID-19. The Orange County Health Care Agency reports their case count has risen to 20,225 as of July 8, with accumulative deaths now 376. Of concern to our vulnerable residents in Leisure World is that, at last report, more than half of these who have died have been nursing or assisted living facility residents.
Fortunately, most of us in LW continue to follow guidelines issued by the Governor and GRF. However, there is increasing concern that recent claims that the virus is “totally harmless” to 99 percent of people who get the disease could negatively influence other people’s behavior, like people who come into LW on a daily basis, as well as those with whom Leisure Worlders interact when shopping for supplies or keeping appointments.
Unfortunately, in some cases even wearing masks has become a tense issue. The Orange County Register on July 5 reported that, “In Southern California alone, the evidence of conflict over masks is everywhere: viral videos of public tantrums and confrontations, partisan bickering and shaming on social media, political tirades at public meetings — even death threats.”
The Democratic Club is also concerned about hearing negative comments related to the growing support for the necessity of taking a fresh look at policing in the United States. Some people worry that recommendations that being made by Black Lives Matter movement supporters will result in more crime, including murders. However, The Bureau of Justice Statistics announced in 2010 that the homicide rate had reached a four-decade low. According to the Marshall Project, researchers and experts couldn’t agree on exactly why it happened.
If a larger police presence and new policing tactics were the main drivers in the decline in crime, dramatic city-by-city differences based on which cities had implemented the new tactics should have been expected. However, there wasn’t much variation. According to the same report cited above, three cities that experienced large crime declines—Washington, D.C., New York City and San Diego—pursued vastly different policing strategies.
The July 5 issue of the Los Angeles Times includes an extensive analysis of a decade of LAPD logs outlining the possibilities and challenges of redefining policing. In the June 30 issue of the Sun, Seal Beach Police Chief Phil Gonshak describes his department’s platforms and social programs. Both reports are worth reading. Those interested can email mlarson.telfords@gmail.com for copies.
••••
The report on the campaign to discredit the safety of voting by mail has been postponed. Email mlarson.telfords@gmail.com to subscribe to the Democratic Club’s electronic newsletters.
OBituaries
Bob McCauley
1937-2020
Bob McCauley died at his home in Redondo Beach on June 24, 2020, and went to be with his Lord. Whatever Bob did, he seemed to know how to excel, and one important thing to him was meeting people, making friends, and caring about everyone Many times, he mentioned how much he liked his work at Leisure World simply because of the people he was privileged to meet.
Bob worked with Superwire for many years, and may have helped them with their TV, phone or internet problems. He contributed emotional and financial support to the Golden Age Foundation for over 20 years and always showimg how much he cared about the community and shareholders.
Bob McCauley grew up in Dallas, Texas and graduated from SMU with his degree in electrical engineering. He, his wife Lou, and two of their children moved from Texas to California after college and made their home here.
Throughout his life, he had his fingers in many pies such as computers (worked on the Star Wars Program and other space programs), marathons, karate, boxing, wrestling, teasing people, writing a novel, Bible studies, traveling to Africa to help build water wells, always learning new things (like Spanish), just to name a few.
He loved and was loved by his wife of 62 years, Lou, and they had four children, Kelley, Marlo, Lara, and Elijah. And if all Bob’s family might speak for him, they think he would say “make every moment count, Leisure World, and thanks for the memories.”
The Celebration of Life of Bob McCauley was held on July 3 at his long time residency in Redondo Beach with loving family and friends who loved him very much.

•••
In Memoriam
James Herrick
Diane Parks
Robert McDonald
Pachanee Thammasuvimol
William Hannigan
Bertha Mae Bullock
Jose Farjas Prieto
Sherill Bobb
Michael Toplikar
Paul Albus
Families assisted by
McKenzie Mortuary,
961-9301
—paid obituary

Page 20
Religion Directory
Editors note: The religion directory is to help LWers find out information about their church during the ongoing coronavirus situation. Pastors and church leaders can email laurieb@lwsb.com to submit contact updates or service livestream website addresses.
Redeemer Lutheran Church
13564 St. Andrews Dr., LW
Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study, Wed., 10-11:30 a.m.
430-8619

St. Theodore Episcopal Church
Sunday Service 12:15 p.m.
2nd and 4th Wednesday 11:30 a.m
13564 St Andrews Dr

Leisure World Assembly of God
Clubhouse 3, Room 2
Bible class, 9:30 a.m.
Sunday worship, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Bible study, Wed, 10 a.m.
CH 3, Room 6

Congregation Sholom
Clubhouse 3 lobby
Friday service, 7 p.m. Saturday service, 9:30 a.m.

Church of Jesus Christ of LDS
Family home Evenings,
Clubhouse 3, Room 1
3rd Monday, 6 p.m., Sept.-June

First Christian Church
Sunday Bible study, 9 a.m.;
Worship Service, 10:15,
Chapel on Northwood Road behind Carport 125
Bible studies, 10 a.m., Tues. & Thur., 431-8810

Holy Family Catholic
13900 Church Place
Mass Mon-Sat., 8:30 a.m.
Saturday, 5 p.m.
Sunday at 8 a.m., 10 a.m., noon, 430-8170

Buddha Circle
Fourth Saturday of the month,
9:30 a.m., Clubhouse 4, Section B;
(562) 296-5588

LW Community Church
14000 Church Place
Sunday worship, 9:50 a.m.,
(562) 431-2503

LW Baptist Church
Clubhouse 4, Sun., 9:45 a.m.;
Bible class, 8:45 a.m, Art Rm.
Wed. Bible study, 3 p.m., CH 3, Rm. 1 (2nd Wed in CH 4)
Em Schoonhoven, 430-2920

Chinese Bible Study Fellowship
Bible Study, Christian Fellowship, Tuesday (except June, July, August) 1:30-3:30 p.m., Clubhouse 3, Rm. 5, (last Tues, Rm. 9), 430-2209

Seal Beach Sa-Rang Church
Clubhouse 3, Room 1
Sunday worship, 11 a.m.
Wednesday worship, Bible study, 7 p.m., 493-5110

Korean Catholic Fellowship
3rd Saturdays, 5 p.m.
Clubhouse 3, Room 4
(562) 431-8902

Seal Beach Cornerstone Church
Sunday worship (Korean),
9:45 a.m., Clubhouse 2
(562) 331-6104

Calvary Chapel Bible Study
First Christian Chapel on Northwood Road behind Carport 125
Thursdays, 6 p.m.
Phil O’Malley, 598-0270

Salvation Army
St. Andrews Clubhouse 4
Home League, Mon., 7 p.m.

GENERAL
AVON
Lenora Browning, LW Resident. Phone 562-493-5457. Seal Beach Business License #BRN000. 12/31/20
GARDENING
FRANK’S GARDENING SERVICE
Complete maintenance and landscape. Serving Leisure World since 1978. Planting, clean-ups, fertilization. New lawns, etc. Offering my services to all Mutual’s. Honest and reliable. State Contractor’s License #779462. Call 562-863-7739, 562-743-3832 or 714-527-1172.
HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Additions & Remodeling, Kitchen & Bath Remodeling, Windows, Tile & Stonework. State Contractor’s License #393071.
OGAN CONSTRUCTION, INC.
(562) 596-7757. 03/31/22
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562-596-0559
LW DECOR INC.
Remodeling/Renovations
New triple pane windows,
laminate flooring, carpet patio
tile/carpet. Painting ceilings
made smooth, ceiling lights.
Exterior windows,
refaced kitchen cabinets,
refaced granite quartz countertops.
Lic. #723262. 07/02
LW DECOR INC.
562-596-0559
———————————————————————–

JR HOME REPAIRS. Quality work. Perfectionist, honest & reliable. Call JR 562-519-2764. SB Business License #JRH0001. 07/08/2021
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MP CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Specializing in remodeling, Additions, Reconstruction, Window replacement and more! Call for a free estimate.
562-746-5400.
License #954725. 04/22/21

BATHTUB & SHOWER REFINISHING
We refinish your TUB/SHOWER to look brand new.
Convert to a WALK-IN SHOWER and/or raise seat.
Nu Kote 562-833-3911
License #699080
Serving LW since 1999. 09/17

PAINTING

Painting – Free estimates. 1 room or entire house & refinish kitchen cabinets. Call Jerry (714) 826-8636.
CA State License #675336. 08/06
———————————————-
562-596-0559
LW DECOR INC.
Only premium paints,
Ceilings made smooth.
New handles-hindges
Cown moulding installed.
License #723262.
LW DECOR INC
40 years in LW.
562-596-0559. 07/02
FLOOR COVERINGS
562-596-0559
LW Decor Inc.
Laminate, Vinyl, Plank, Patio tile and Patio carpet.
License #723262.
40 years in Leisure World.
562-596-0559. 07/02
——————————

310-261-0571
Interior Flooring Solutions
Hardwood floors, carpet,
laminate, vinyl planks.
25 years experience.
Contractor License 1043763. 12/24
CARPET & UPHOLSTERY
CLEANING & REPAIR
All Year Carpet Cleaning
We just cleaned your neighbor’s house in Leisure World…
Would you like yours cleaned too?
Call Tito (562) 658 – 9841.
Since 1988.
State Contractors Lic. #578194.07/30

SKYLIGHT SERVICES
SKYLIGHTS
CLEAN, REPAIR, REPLACE.
Licensed and insured.
Dan (562) 841-3787.
Seal Beach License #BRA0002. 09/24
WINDOW COVERINGS
LW DECOR INC.
Blinds, shutters, shades, 40 years serving Leisure World. Contractor’s License #723262.
LW DECOR INC.
562-596-0559. 07/02
WINDOW WASHING
WANT CLEAN WINDOWS?
I Clean Inside & Outside Or…
Clean Outside Only and Save $$$.
(562) 600-0014. LW Resident,
Rich Livitsky. Seal Beach
Business License #LIV0004. 07/23
Leisure World
Helping Leisure World

Y’s Service Club of the YMCA will assist residents with small non-professional jobs. We change light bulbs, clean air conditioner filters, hang a small picture or mirror, remove or place items on a high shelf, air bicycle tires, etc. Donations gladly accepted. Call weekdays between 9 am-5 pm, (562) 596-9906.
——————————————-
“ROLLIN THUNDER”
GOLF CART CLUB
Offers FREE advice on buying and selling of your golf cart.
562-431-6859.
——————————————
Does your walker need new tennis balls? Delivery and installation provided. Please give your name and phone number. Maria Giegerich 562-596-9983. Free of charge.
HOME CARE
PERSONAL ASSISTANT
Maria’s experieced caregivers, run errands, Dr’s appointments, cleaning, cooking, part-time, full-time, live-in. (562) 230-4648. Seal Beach Business License #CAM0006. 12/31/20
————————–
I am an experienced caregiver available to assist with daily care, doctor’s appointments, and errands. Available 24/7. 949-899-7770. 10/01
———————————————————————–
CHRISTIAN HOME CARE
Referral Agency. Experienced, knowledgeable caregivers, honest, assertive, fluent English. Hourly/full-time, doctor’s appointments, errands. Bernadine 562-310-0280. Seal Beach Business License #BCS0002. Bonded/insured. 12/10/20
——————————————-
EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER
Over 20 years in Leisure World with Excellent References. Hourly or Live-in. Please Call Pampet: 562-371-4895. Seal Beach License PAN0003 09/24
———————————————————————–
Elderly care. Live-in, live-out. 30 years of experience. Cooking, cleaning, medications, companions, doctors. Experience with dementia. Licensed by the state.
Gloria 949-371-7425. 09/17
BEAUTY SERVICES

Tammy Nguyen Phenix Salon – Service in private suite. One customer, one hairstylist. Sanitized & professional. Haircut for men & women, shampoo, set, color, highlights, perm, nails & toenails. In-house service available. Tammy Nguyen. 13944 Seal Beach Blvd, #116. (714) 425-4198. 09/03
——————————————-
In home hair care, serving the men and women of Leisure World for 36 years. Mel, cell: 562-480-9341. License #KC75538. 07/16
Get the beautiful hair at home. Countless happy clients with good referrals. Gabriel (562)708-3170 License #B50551. 08/06
HOUSE CLEANING

Patricia House Cleaning, weekly or monthly. Excellent referrals in Leisure World. 562-397-4659 Seal
Beach License LUC0001.07/16
————————————————————————
General housekeeping, 30 years of experience. Bi-weekly or monthly. Seal Beach License RAZ0002. Call Gloria 949-371-7425. 09/17

————————————-
Maria House Cleaning
We’ll make your house look as nice as possible! 15 years of experience, We can work with your schedule. Bi-weekly or monthly. Deep cleaning.
Call or text 714-496-2885.
Bus. Lic #HER0008. 07/16
————————————
GRACIAN’S HOUSECLEANING & WINDOWS.
Windows 10% off first cleaning
General housecleaning
Excellent referrals in LW
(562) 307-3861.
20 years experience.
Seal Beach Business License gra0006. 09/17

COMPUTERS

FRUSTRATED
(562)755-6199
Everything for your computer (PC or Mac), cell phone, TV, stereo, any electronic device.
Tina Schaffer. Seal Beach Bus.
License #CIP0001 08/20
AUTOS WANTED
ANY KIND OF CAR
Cars, motorcycle, truck – running or not. We are local – call anytime! We pay cash and remove promptly!We do DMV and Release of liability for you! Bonded/Licensed, since 1985! Call us so we can come out and give you a quote. 562-684-0901. 07/30
Electric CarTs/ Scooters/Mobile Chairs for sale

Golf Cart, Sales, parts and services. 714-292-9124. 05/13/2021
———————————————————————–
Pride Raptor 3-wheel scooter. Like new, 2 yrs old. $1,200 OBO. Located in Seal Beach Leisure World.
(714) 504-6755. 07/16
TRANSPORTATION
Need a lift? Pam Miller.
LW Resident. 310-227-1258. 07/23
——————————————-
Rides by Russ,
With the personal touch.
For over 4 years I have been giving all types of rides to Leisure World residents. Rides to the airports, doctors, cruise ports, shopping and errands I also enjoy helping my neighbors with chores and maintenance around their homes. Russ 714-655-1544. 07/16
Autos/Boats/RV’s
Trailers FOR SALE
ELECTRIC CAR PADS
Installed at your residence. Call Frank 562-743-3832. State Contractor’s License #779462. 09/03
————————————————————————-
2009 Buick Lucerne, 4-door for sale. LW. (562) 431-8156. 07/16
MOVING, HAULING &
STORAGE SERVICES
J&D HAUL AWAY AND CLEAN-UP SERVICE
No job too small, fast, reliable, great prices. Seal Beach Business License
BRA0002. Dan: 562-841-3787 09/24
——————————————-
A FRIEND AND A TRUCK
Your moving service, any size job. Call 310-387-2618. Business License RO263644. 09/17
AUTO REPAIR
SERVICES

Semi-retired mechanic doing small jobs – oil change, alternators, water pumps, starters & maintenance, air conditioning work done. Will not recommend work that is not needed. CA BAR #0262439. After 9: 00 a.m. Local. (562) 306-2686. 07/16

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

Private moving sale – Please call for an appointment 714-943-1818, July 15-22. Llardros, Hummels, Swarovski crystal, Cut glass, Sterling, roll top desk, entertainment center, dining table Glinda Davist https://www.flickr.com/photos/120349245@N07/albums.
————————————-
Moving sale – Collectibles: Toy cars, Mugs, other items. Household items. Lamps, clocks, framed pictures. Kitchen items, Glassware, Microwave. Bedroom Set including Mirror and Dressers. Sofa 6 Feet, good condition. Call after 8:00am daily. (714) 749-4932.
——————————————-
Adult bicycle, good condition. New tire. $45. Bicycle pump & U-lock included. (714) 717-7959.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

LOOKING TO BUY WOODEN JIGSAW PUZZLES with character-shaped “whimsey” pieces for my aunt. “Liberty, Wentworth or Nautilus”. Please feel free to call or text me at (805) 861-7132 or email at margaret.maui@gmail.com. Thank you, Margaret.

LW CARPORTS FOR RENT

$1 a Day. Min. 90 days. 2 carport storage units in Mutual 12. Reply by text to Lynette: 818.219.7572. 07/16/20

FREE ITEMS

Free 6 Qt. Crock Pot. 562-594-0994, if no answer, leave a message.
——————————————
Because of the current pandemic, I, Jeffrey Sacks, will give two new earloop masks to each LW resident who leaves his or her name & address (Mutual & Unit #). Please call or text my cell phone:
(714) 642-0122.