LWW Trans/Vie Ed. 11-12-20

Pages 1-4, 12, 22, 23 Nov 12 2020

Minibus service available to free flu shot clinic

OptumCare will host a second drive-through flu shot clinic in the Clubhouse 4 parking lot on Monday, Nov. 16, between 8 a.m.-2 p.m. This one is free to all, even if your insurance does not cover it or you are not a member of OptumCare (for complete information on what you need to get your shot, see page 6). 

Leisure World residents are welcome to avoid the hassle by taking a GRF Minibus to the clinic. The blue-and-white buses will be available to take any resident on Nov. 16. All bus routes (A, B, C, D) will operate on the regular weekday schedules as printed in the 2020 Minibus booklet. See pages 12-19 in the Minibus Book for route maps and timetables. This service will be available from 8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Schedule books can be picked up from any Leisure World bus. Just stop the bus and request a copy from the driver. You can also call (562) 431-6586, ext. 372, and request a copy to be delivered.

ACCESS bus resident passengers can make an appointment beginning today, Nov. 12. Limited appointments will be made on the half-hour from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. Call (562) 431-6586, ext. 379, to schedule an appointment. ACCESS service is for residents who have mobility challenges or use a mobility aid, such as a wheelchair.

There will be an on-call bus available for immediate passenger pick-ups all day Monday, Nov. 16, from 7:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m., but this service will be subject to delays of up to 30 minutes depending on demand load. Call (562) 431-6586, ext. 372, for the on-call flu clinic bus on Thursday only.

All bus passengers will be required to wear a face covering. No mask, no ride. Also, due to social-distancing requirements, buses may have limited available seating. Bring completed waivers (see page 6 for more information on waivers). You may pick one up at the HCC, the Recreation Office, or on any GRF bus.

For more information, contact Grant Winford, (562) 431-6586, ext. 372.

Food drive to benefit veterans

The American Legion won’t be able to hold its annual Veterans Day obervance this year because of COVID-19 restrictions. So the GRF Recreation Department is coordinating a month-long food drive during November to benefit the Paralyzed Veterans of America, California Chapter, based in Long Beach.

The group’s mission is to make lives better for paralyzed veterans and their families across Southern California. It has a long and historic legacy dating back to World War II.  Its work includes spinal cord research, advocacy, and sports and recreation for local heroes.

Residents are asked to bring canned goods and other non-perishable food items to the Recreation Department in Building 5, the LW Library, Security Main Gate or the St. Andrews Gate.  Community donations will help make a difficult year and holiday season brighter for these wounded warriors and their families.

Saluting Veterans—Thank you for your service

Without the sacrifices of the brave men and women who serve in the U.S. Armed Forces, the liberty of American life—freedom of expression without fear of being arrested and freedom to worship without fear of persecution—would  be imperiled. Every day, memories of WWII—its sights, sounds, terror and triumphs—disappear. Here are the stories of three survivors of the war that changed the world. The Golden Rain Foundation salutes all members of the American Armed Forces, past and present.

Jim Kaspar, Mutual 15

WWII Air Corps engineer Jim Kaspar is well known in Leisure World circles. The American Legionnaire has lived here for 29 years. In his heyday, he and his wife, Peggy, could be found twirling around the square dance floor with the Leisure Whirlers and on the golf course.

He’s best known for his work collecting and distributing food and clothing for needy veterans.

Life has slowed down a lot for the 96-year-old, but his mind remains lightning fast and razor sharp.

He remembers with clarity working on B-24s attached to the 466th Heavy Bombing Group. More than 18,000 B-24 aircraft—flown by every branch of the U.S. Armed Forces and many Allied nations—carried WWII to Axis targets worldwide. Workers built them; pilots were trained to fly them, and the ground crew maintained them, patching them up night after night.  

One memorable night, as Jim’s crew was flying back to the U.S., they made contact with a plane that had lost navigational contact and was in danger of ditching in the Atlantic while approaching Goose Bay, Labrador. 

Jim’s plane, with only an hour’s fuel supply, flew out to find the disabled B-24. Radio operator John Stering made contact with the aircraft, and tail gunner Don D’Lugos spotted it. The pilot followed Jim’s plane and made a down-wind landing, much more challenging than taking advantage of a headwind to slow descent. Jim’s crew heard the plane blow a tire as it hit the ground, but the airmen safely arrived at the Canadian Forces base in Happy Valley-Goose Bay. 

The two crews later met at the operations building. One of the rescued airmen asked for the identity of the radio operator, who had located and assisted his plane. The crew pointed to radio operator John Stering. The rescued airman grabbed Jack by the arm, shook his head from side to side, and walked off, unable to say a word. 

“I’ll remember that for the rest of my life,” said Jim, who was awarded several medals in recognition of his WWII services. 

He went on to work as a printer for the Press-Telegram for 45 years. He and Peggy had four children and now have five grandchildren and as many great-grands. Jim was once a columnist for the square dancing and golf clubs for the LW Weekly.

Sandy Goldfarb, Mutual 12

Sanford “Sandy” Goldfarb is a feisty guy with an easy smile who is beloved in his Mutual 12 community, having served as a director for many years. He’s affectionately known “Dad” or “Pops” by his American Legion pals, some of whom are young enough to be his children. 

When asked if surviving Iwo Jima was the highpoint of his life, he instantly and robustly yelled, “hell yes!”

Only one in three Marines did. Iwo Jima, a tiny island that’s one-tenth the size of Catalina, was the infamous site of the bloodiest battle of WWII. It happened 75 years ago this year (Feb. 19-March 26, 1945). The U.S. Armed Forces sent 70,000 troops to the island, using 880 landing vessels to take them to the beach. There were 22,000 Japanese soldiers waiting; the fight lasted for 36 days. The Japanese its entire force, except for 200 men. 

Sandy joined the Marines in 1942 and trained with the newly formed 4th Division in Camp Pendleton. He departed for the Pacific in January 1944. His first taste of combat came at Roi-Namur in the Marshall Islands chain. From there Sandy fought at Tinian and Saipan before returing to Hawaii to train and refit for the invasion of Iwo Jima.

Sandy spent 36 days fighting on Iwo Jima. He was the forward observer, the eyes and ears of the artillery, telling shooters were to fire. He was then sent to Okinawa as a replacement for the 1st Marine Division. After the war, he served in Northern China, helping to disarm Japanese troops.

The decorated Marine was honored for his service by Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library.  

This year, he was invited to be honored at a 75th anniversary remembrance on the island of Iwo Jima, hosted by the National WWII Museum, New Orleans. He was planning on attending with his son. But COVID-19 canceled the trip.

“Still, I can’t complain,” he said. “I have had a great life. I served with pride, and I came out alive.”

 Morton H. Goldberg, Mutual 14

Morton Goldberg, 96, of Mutual 14 joined the army at 19, serving in the 364th Station Hospital under the Sixth Army in the Pacific Theater. 

He was born and raised in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and was 18 when Pearl Harbor happened on Dec. 7, 1941. After the United States entered World War II, the new Selective Service Act made men between 18-45 liable for military service. It required men between 18-65 to register. From 1940-1947, over 10 million men were inducted.

On March 22, 1943, Mort got his induction notice. The U.S. Army gave him seven days to get his affairs in order and report. He would be gone for almost three years. Because of Army secrecy, his family never knew where he was. 

“The Army gave me 7 days to get my affairs in order and report,” he said. “I was working for Westinghouse. They told me my job would be there upon my return. Most of my friends had not gone into the service yet. My family took me to the train station. My mother and grandfather did not realize I would be gone for almost three years.”

Cpl. Morton H. Goldberg drove an ambulance and worked in hospital wards in the medical corps in the Pacific Theater. He trained from March-July 1943, when he left Camp Stoneman, California, for the jungles of New Guinea. He served at the 364th Station Hospital under the Sixth Army tending wounded sent back from the frontlines. 

The war ended in September 1945, and Cpl. Goldberg and his squad sailed to Japan on the USS Hope, where he was stationed at a Kyota Hospital. After two months, orders sent him homeward on the USS Freestone. The ship docked at Fort Lewis, Seattle, and Goldberg took a train to Camp Atterbury, Indiana, where he got his discharge papers and headed home to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

“I wrote a letter to my mother every day, except when I was on the ship,” said Goldberg. “And she wrote to me every day. I saved all of her letters and brought them home in my barracks bag. I did not know that she saved all my letters too, and now I have all of our correspondence, our story of the war.”

At Camp Robinson, Little Rock, Arkansas, the Army trained him to crawl under barbwire while soldiers shot over us, climb over walls and march, lots of marching. 

He also trained as a medic—medical surgical assistance, X-ray, laboratory, pharmacy, dental and veterinary technicians. Schools were established at general hospitals, military posts, civilian colleges, and commercial institutions. In addition, medical soldiers were also trained to work as part of a unit or team, ranging from an optical detachment of two enlisted men to a 2,000-bed numbered general hospital with 898 officers, nurses, and enlisted men. In short, men had to be trained to perform special duties in a multitude of medical units in a chain of evacuation stretching from the frontlines to general hospitals. 

Mort became a medical orderly. “I would help nurses and doctors with various jobs. Caring for the patient’s needs. During my time there, President Franklin D. Roosevelt came to visit. We all dressed in our best clothes, lined up, and saluted him as he drove passed.” 

Camp Stoneman in Pittsburg, California, was the primary staging point for the Pacific Theater during WWII. Camp Stoneman was just down river from San Francisco Bay. Soon we took a bus to the docks in San Francisco.

“We boarded the MS Klipfontein, a Dutch ship used by the US War Shipping Administration, flying the flag of Holland. It was late 1943. We each had various duties aboard the ship as we did during training,” Mort said. “Our bunks were stacked five high. Traveling without any escort, it took us almost two months to reach Brisbane, Australia. We spent both Thanksgiving and Christmas aboard the ship.”

WWII introduced the United States to global war, exposing personnel to newly encountered foreign diseases. In the South Pacific, heat, incessant rain, insects and vermin frustrated efforts to control disease. Despite medical advances, for every two men lost to battle in the Southwest Pacific theatre (Australia, New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Dutch East Indies, Borneo, and the Philippines), five men were lost to disease, according to historial accounts

Once the U.S. Marines and the Australians took control of southern New Guinea, Mort was shipped to Finschhafen (French Haven). It was a on a southeastern tip of the island. “It was nothing but jungle, dirty and full of various living things, animal and insect, which would bite,” remembered Mort. “We cleared the jungle, cut down coconut trees, with the help of the natives. We set up our unit we became the 364th Station Hospital Unit of the 6th Army.  Almost immediately our Station Hospital started to receive wounded. I was doing everything to help the doctors and nurses. As the patients came in I helped with wheelchairs and gurneys. Cleaning, washing, feeding the wounded was common. It was February of 1944.”  

 “During the battle of Hollandia, March-May of 1944, which completed the Allied control of New Guinea, we continue to receive sick and wounded daily. We helped with everything: guard duty, kitchen duty, unloading supplies, latrines and anything assigned by our superiors, rarely getting time off. 

He remembers showering with ocean water, not great; mosquito nets were required for a good night’s sleep and to fight against malaria.  Rain was constant, filling helmets. 

The fighting moved toward the Philippines during the late summer of 1944 and would continue through early 1945. 

On May 20, 1945, the 364th Station Hospital moved and set up in San Fernando, Luzon, Philippines. Life was the same with occasional highpoints. “Close to my birthday, another guy in our unit got a cake from home. There was a bottle of whisky inside the cake. We celebrated,” Mort said. 

By early October, the 364th Station Hospital took over a Japanese Hospital in Kyoto. “My duties continued until my service was up and I came back to the U.S. early in 1946. I got back to Ft. Lewis, Washington, and they gave me a train ticket home.”   

These days Mort and his wife, Helene, enjoy their days in Mutual 14. 

Stering. The rescued airman grabbed Jack by the arm, shook his head from side to side, and walked off, unable to say a word. 

“I’ll remember that for the rest of my life,” said Jim, who was awarded several medals in recognition of his WWII service. 

He went on to work as a printer for the Press-Telegram for 45 years. He and Peggy had four children and now have five grandchildren and as many great-grands. Jim was once a columnist for the square dancing and golf clubs for the LW Weekly.

Sandy Goldfarb, Mutual 12

Sanford “Sandy” Goldfarb is a feisty guy with an easy smile who is beloved in his Mutual 12 community, having served as a director for many years. He’s affectionately known “Dad” or “Pops” by his American Legion pals, some of whom are young enough to be his children. 

When asked if surviving Iwo Jima was the high point of his life, he instantly and robustly yelled, “Hell yes!”

Only one in three Marines did. Iwo Jima, a tiny island that’s one-tenth the size of Catalina, was the infamous site of the bloodiest battle of WWII. It happened 75 years ago this year (Feb. 19-March 26, 1945). The U.S. Armed Forces sent 70,000 troops to the island, using 880 landing vessels to take them to the beach. There were 22,000 Japanese soldiers waiting; the fight lasted for 36 days. The Japanese lost its entire force, with the exception of 200 men. 

Sandy joined the Marines in 1942 and trained with the newly formed 4th Division at Camp Pendleton. He departed for the Pacific in January 1944. His first taste of combat came at Roi-Namur in the Marshall Islands chain. From there, Sandy fought at Tinian and Saipan before returing to Hawaii to train and refit for the invasion of Iwo Jima.

Sandy spent 36 days fighting on Iwo Jima. He was the forward observer, the eyes and ears of the artillery, telling shooters where to fire. He was then sent to Okinawa as a replacement for the 1st Marine Division. After the war, he served in Northern China, helping to disarm Japanese troops.

The decorated Marine was honored for his service by Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library.  

This year, he was invited to be honored at a 75th anniversary remembrance on the island of Iwo Jima, hosted by the National WWII Museum, New Orleans. 

He was planning on attending with his son. But COVID-19 canceled the trip. “Still, I can’t complain,” he said. “I have had a great life. I served with pride, and I came out alive.”

Morton H. Goldberg

Mutual 14

Morton Goldberg, 96, of Mutual 14 joined the Army at 19, serving in the 364th Station Hospital under the Sixth Army in the Pacific Theater. 

He was born and raised in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and was 18 when Pearl Harbor was attacked on Dec. 7, 1941. After the United States entered World War II, the new Selective Service Act made men between 18-45 liable for military service. It required men between 18-65 to register. From 1940-1947, over 10 million men were conscripted.

On March 22, 1943, Mort got his induction notice. The U.S. Army gave him seven days to get his affairs in order and report. He would be gone for almost three years. Because of Army secrecy, his family never knew where he was. 

“I was working for Westinghouse. They told me my job would be there upon my return,” he said. “Most of my friends had not gone into the service yet. My family took me to the train station. My mother and grandfather did not realize I would be gone for almost three years.”

Cpl. Morton H. Goldberg drove an ambulance and worked in hospital wards in the medical corps in the Pacific Theater. He trained from March-July 1943, when he left Camp Stoneman, California, for the jungles of New Guinea. He served at the 364th Station Hospital under the Sixth Army tending wounded sent back from the front lines. 

The war ended in September 1945, and Cpl. Goldberg and his squad sailed aboard the USS Hope to Japan, where he was stationed at a Kyota hospital. After two months, orders sent him homeward on the USS Freestone. The ship docked at Fort Lewis, Seattle, and Mort took a train to Camp Atterbury, Indiana, where he got his discharge papers and headed home to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

“I wrote a letter to my mother every day, except when I was on the ship,” said Mort. “And she wrote to me every day. I saved all of her letters and brought them home in my barracks bag. I did not know that she saved all my letters, too, and now I have all of our correspondence, our story of the war.”

At Camp Robinson, Little Rock, Arkansas, the Army trained him to crawl under barbwire while soldiers shot over them, to climb over walls and to march, lots of marching. 

He also trained as a medic—medical surgical assistance, X-ray, laboratory, pharmacy, dental and veterinary technicians. Schools were established at general hospitals, military posts, civilian colleges, and commercial institutions. In addition, medical soldiers were also trained to work as part of a unit or team, ranging from an optical detachment of two enlisted men to a 2,000-bed numbered general hospital with 898 officers, nurses, and enlisted men. In short, men had to be trained to perform special duties in a multitude of medical units in a chain of evacuation stretching from the frontlines to general hospitals. 

Mort became a medical orderly. “I would help nurses and doctors with various jobs. Caring for the patient’s needs. During my time there, President Franklin D. Roosevelt came to visit. We all dressed in our best clothes, lined up, and saluted him as he drove passed.” 

Camp Stoneman in Pittsburg, California, was the primary staging point for the Pacific Theater during WWII. Camp Stoneman was just down river from San Francisco Bay. Soon we took a bus to the docks in San Francisco.

“We boarded the MS Klipfontein, a Dutch ship used by the US War Shipping Administration, flying the flag of Holland. It was late 1943. We each had various duties aboard the ship as we did during training,” Mort said. “Our bunks were stacked five high. Traveling without any escort, it took us almost two months to reach Brisbane, Australia. We spent both Thanksgiving and Christmas aboard the ship.”

WWII introduced the United States to global war, exposing personnel to newly encountered foreign diseases. In the South Pacific, heat, incessant rain, insects and vermin frustrated efforts to control disease. Despite medical advances, for every two men lost to battle in the Southwest Pacific theatre (Australia, New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Dutch East Indies, Borneo, and the Philippines), five men were lost to disease, according to historial accounts

Once the U.S. Marines and the Australians took control of southern New Guinea, Mort was shipped to Finschhafen (French Haven). It was a on a southeastern tip of the island. “It was nothing but jungle, dirty and full of various living things, animal and insect, which would bite,” remembered Mort. “We cleared the jungle, cut down coconut trees, with the help of the natives. We set up our unit we became the 364th Station Hospital Unit of the 6th Army.  Almost immediately our Station Hospital started to receive wounded. I was doing everything to help the doctors and nurses. As the patients came in I helped with wheelchairs and gurneys. Cleaning, washing, feeding the wounded was common. It was February of 1944.”  

 “During the battle of Hollandia, March-May of 1944, which completed the Allied control of New Guinea, we continue to receive sick and wounded daily. We helped with everything: guard duty, kitchen duty, unloading supplies, latrines and anything assigned by our superiors, rarely getting time off. 

He remembers showering with ocean water, not great; mosquito nets were required for a good night’s sleep and to fight against malaria.  Rain was constant, filling helmets. 

The fighting moved toward the Philippines during the late summer of 1944 and would continue through early 1945. 

On May 20, 1945, the 364th Station Hospital moved and set up in San Fernando, Luzon, Philippines. Life was the same with occasional highpoints. “Close to my birthday, another guy in our unit got a cake from home. There was a bottle of whisky inside the cake. We celebrated,” Mort said. 

By early October, the 364th Station Hospital took over a Japanese Hospital in Kyoto. “My duties continued until my service was up and I came back to the U.S. early in 1946. I got back to Ft. Lewis, Washington, and they gave me a train ticket home.”   

These days Mort and his wife, Helene, enjoy their time in Mutual 14. 

All About Veterans Day

In 1921, an unknown World War I American soldier was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. This site, on a hillside overlooking the Potomac River and the city of Washington, D.C., became the focal point of reverence for America’s veterans.

Similar ceremonies occurred earlier in England and France, where an unknown soldier was buried in each nation’s highest place of honor (in England, Westminster Abbey; in France, the Arc de Triomphe). These memorial gestures all took place on Nov. 11, giving universal recognition to the celebrated ending of World War I fighting at 11 a.m., Nov. 11, 1918 (the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month). The day became known as “Armistice Day.”

Armistice Day officially received its name in America in 1926 through a Congressional resolution. It became a national holiday 12 years later by similar Congressional action. If the idealistic hope had been realized that World War I was “the war to end all wars,” Nov. 11 might still be called Armistice Day. But only a few years after the holiday was proclaimed, war broke out in Europe. Sixteen and one-half million Americans took part. Four hundred seven thousand  died in service, more than 292,000 of them in battle.

Armistice Day Changed to 

Honor All Veterans

The first celebration using the term Veterans Day occurred in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1947. Raymond Weeks, a World War II veteran, organized “National Veterans Day,” which included a parade and other festivities, to honor all veterans. The event was held on Nov. 11, then designated Armistice Day. 

Later, U.S. Representative Edward Rees of Kansas proposed a bill that would change Armistice Day to Veterans Day. In 1954, Congress passed the bill that President Eisenhower signed proclaiming Nov. 11 as Veterans Day. Raymond Weeks received the Presidential Citizens Medal from President Reagan in November 1982. Weeks’ local parade and ceremonies are now an annual event celebrated nationwide.

 National Ceremonies Held at Arlington National Cemetery

The focal point for official, national ceremonies for Veterans Day continues to be the memorial amphitheater built around the Tomb of the Unknowns. At 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, a combined color guard representing all military services executes “Present Arms” at the tomb. The nation’s tribute to its war dead is symbolized by the laying of a presidential wreath. The bugler plays “taps.” The rest of the ceremony takes place in the amphitheater.

Veterans Day ceremonies at Arlington and elsewhere are coordinated by the President’s Veterans Day National Committee. Chaired by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, the committee represents national veterans organizations.

—from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Construction Updates

GRF projects are underway around the community despite slowdowns attributed to COVID-19. This column will update residents on the progress of various construction projects. The information is provided by GRF Facilities Director Mark Weaver and Physical Property Manager David Rudge.

LW POOL

 GRF Facilities Director Mark Weaver expects plans from the pool architect this week. Once they arrive, the GRF will submit them to the City of Seal Beach and Orange County Health Care Agency for approvals. When the agencies having jurisdiction approve the plans and issue permits, construction will begin. The date for the pool to be open is April 5, 2021.

Weaver and Physical Property Manager David Rudge met with a SoCal Gas representative Nov. 5 to locate the new meter at the pool. 

The work will be contracted by the gas company to begin within the next couple of weeks, depending on the weather. 

The new meter will be upgraded from 1.5M BTU to 3.0M BTU to accommodate the 2.3M BTUs in the plan.

The pool area was marked by Underground Service Alert (USA) for excavation Nov. 6. 

The COVID-19 crisis has heavily impacted response times by major utilities.

The good news is that the electrical contractor has worked through the process and a permit from GRF was issued. 

The contractor has submitted plans to the City of Seal Beach for the Mini Farm and the relocation of the golf course pump located in the pool equipment room as well. The City of Seal Beach sends the plans to a third party for review for comments and sends them back to the city. 

LEARNING CENTER 

TEST KITCHEN

Work at the Learning Center Kitchen is currently 95 percent complete. 

The project currently has all fixtures, tiles and foundation work. The last appliance to be installed is the induction cooktop, which is due this week. 

This project is set to be completed by the end of November. The Learning Center Kitchen is designed to host cooking classes and provide a dining space.

GRF staffer tests positive for COVID-19

On Nov. 6, GRF was advised that an employee in the Administration Building tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. GRF took appropriate and immediate action under the established guidelines and mandated privacy regulations.

Without delay, contact tracing was conducted to identify anyone who may have had close contact with this individual (less than six feet for more than 15 minutes within a 24-hour period). 

If you have not been contacted, you have not been identified as having been in close contact with this individual. The obligation of investigating a positive COVID-19 case has been met, and all instituted protocols have been followed while maintaining privacy rights.  

“This remains a time of great uncertainty, and we ask that everyone continue to work together to mitigate the spread of COVID-19,” said GRF Executive Director Randy Ankeny. “GRF has taken proactive actions within its ability and resources to keep employees and community members as safe and healthy as possible, but it requires that we all work together through community unity. 

“Still, with many cases of COVID-19 transmitted before anyone knows they have been exposed,” he continued, “we cannot 100 percent guarantee the virus won’t enter our workplace or community.”

GRF staff is mandated to wear masks at all times and maintain six-feet distances from people. There is minimal office-to-office contact to keep personnel as separated as possible.

This message is ongoing to all GRF staff: Everyone should self-assess daily for potential COVID-19 symptoms (fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, or diarrhea). If you have any symptoms, stay home. If you believe you have been exposed to the virus, contact your medical provider to arrange for testing and self-quarantine for the recommended length of time. 

Here are precautionary measures to protect the health and safety of everyone:

• Wear masks or other facial coverings while in shared office spaces, public or high-risk settings, including shopping, taking public transit or seeking medical care unless granted a specific exception (such as for safety, a medical reason).

• Maintain at least six feet of social distance from others at all times.

• Wash hands frequently for at least 20 seconds using soap and water or use a hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol.

• Cough or sneeze into a tissue or elbow; avoid touching your face.

• Avoid people who are sick, sneezing or coughing.

• Stay home as much as possible and reduce visitors.

• Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that people frequently touch.

• Self-assess your own health for COVID-19 symptoms. 

The GRF is committed to protecting the health and safety of everyone in Leisure World.

—LeAnn Dillman, GRF human resources director

Superwire—Billing process changes

Superwire Telecom is the contracted telecommunications provider for Leisure World Seal Beach, providing customer and technical support to all residents. Charter Spectrum is Superwire’s contracted provider of low-cost, “bulk” cable television services. 

A small number of Leisure World residents received a change in their Charter Spectrum Cable billing during October, and Superwire wants to clarify the changes made by Spectrum.

As part of changes in the Charter Spectrum billing processes, those residents who were purchasing cable television services directly from Charter Spectrum had their monthly Spectrum bill split into two components. NOTE: This change does not affect those residents already enjoying low-cost bulk cable services. As of October 2020:

• BASIC CABLE (Spectrum Select) service will be billed by Golden Rain Foundation at the 2020 monthly “bulk” rate of $32.21 for Leisure World residents.

• The remainder of services purchased from Spectrum will be billed directly to the residents by Charter Spectrum, as usual.

• The bill sent by Charter Spectrum should show a decrease of at least $32.21.

How It Works

All residences in Leisure World, Seal Beach, are eligible to receive “bulk” pricing for basic cable services. 

This bulk pricing is a contracted monthly rate for the basic cable television that had been previously negotiated for the entire LWSB property.  

Residents  may buy additional packages from Charter Spectrum. Residents are in no way required to accept the cable service from Spectrum, but if a resident does purchase cable services, the basic cable service must now be billed through the monthly GRF Assessment. 

To summarize, 

• Spectrum will no longer directly bill residents for Charter Spectrum Select under the Spectrum TV portion on their monthly invoice. This fee will be collected by GRF via the monthly assessment. 

• This change will not disrupt other services purchased from Charter Spectrum, and they will continue to bill for other services, equipment, and if a DVR is required (digital recording device from Spectrum), the DVR Service fee.

• Golden Rain Foundation will bill the normal 2020 bulk cable television fee of $32.21 to the monthly unit assessment. This fee will have a small annual increase for 2021.

Superwire welcomes any questions regarding this or any other topic. Contact Superwire at 562-735-0366, or email at superwiretelecom@gmail.com. 

-—from Superwire

Seal Beach sand berm is under construction

The City of Seal Beach has started construction of the annual winter sand berm. Work started last week. It will take approximately three weeks to complete. 

The construction of the winter sand berm will be performed by Crew, Inc.

The contractor will stage equipment in the 10th Street beach parking lot. 

Public Works will have a portion of the parking lot coned off for the Contractor while the work takes place.

For further information regarding this project, contact David Spitz, associate engineer. at (562) 431-2527 ext. 1331.

Cell Phone Training 

People who are having difficulty hearing or seeing on their smart phones are invited to attend a free workshop on how to make them work better. Training covers volume control, sending text messages, connecting Bluetooth devices, using basic functions and more. 

This is a two-part online training. To participate, you need a computer.

To schedule a smart phone training, call (866) 271-1540 or email smartphonetraining@ddtp.org.

Food Distribution is Nov. 19

Free food is available in Leisure World to eligible residents who are 60 years or older through Community Action Partnership of Orange County (CAPOC), which has a monthly distribution site by Clubhouse 4. 

The next food distribution will be Nov. 19.

Every third Thursday from 9-11 a.m., qualified people receive 40 pounds of food, including  canned fruit, vegetables, meat, rice, juice, cereal and more.  

Eligible seniors must live in Leisure World, be at least 60 years of age and meet income guidelines as follows: up to $1,354 a month for one person; $1,832 for a two-person household; and $2,311 for a three-person household. To sign up, bring a photo ID, and proof of income (Social Security/SSI Statement, letter or bank statement or paycheck stub).

People who are unable to apply themselves or pick up the box of food may send a proxy to act on their behalf with appropriate ID. People who need help arranging a proxy can call GRF Member Resource Liaison Cindy Tostado at 431-6586, ext. 317.  

Thanksgiving Meals in LW

Regular Grab ‘n’ Go service will not be available on Thanksgiving Day, but that doesn’t mean resisdents  can’t celebrate with a traditional holiday dinner with all of the trimmings and none of the work.

• Berg Catering, a popular Grab ‘n’ Go caterer, is offering an extensive holiday menu, and dinners can be delivered with a minimum of four days’ notice through Dec. 30. 

Berg can provide a service staff for residents who don’t want to do anything but enjoy the festive occasion. Pick up a flyer with Bergs’ holiday menu at its weekly Grab ‘n’ Go service or email kathyt@lwsb.com. Look for its ad in LW Weekly and ask about a 15-percent discount for Leisure World residents.

• Naples Rib Company will provide boxed meals for larger groups, both traditional turkey dinners and its famous barbecue. Boxed sandwiches are also available. 

Advance notice is required. See special holiday menus at https://www.ribcompany.com/boxed-meals. Special options might be in the works for LWSB, so don’t hesitate to ask by calling (562) 439-7427.

• The Seal Beach Chamber of Commerce, partnering with the Seal Beach Lions and Pavilions, will deliver Thanksgiving dinners  for families in need on Monday, Nov. 23, between 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Clubhouse 6 parking lot. 

This option is for residents of limited means who are unable to purchase a holiday dinner.

Meals include fully cooked, frozen dinners for four or more to thaw and reheat.

The first 50 GRF members to call and reserve their dinners will be the lucky recipients. 

To reserve a dinner, call (562) 799-0179, specify Leisure World and provide your name and phone number. 

The menu includes a 10- to 12-pound turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, gravy, cranberry sauce, dinner rolls and a pumpkin pie.

 For more information, contact kathyt@lwsb.com or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 398. 

—Kathy Thayer, recreation

Perspectives pg 4

Member Column

by Jim Greer

LW contributor

“The greatest discovery of all time is that a person can change his future by merely changing his attitude,” stated Oprah Winfrey. For everyone, there is a daily battle between cynicism and optimism. Cynicism is part of a defensive posture we assume to protect ourselves. It’s typically triggered when we feel hurt or angry at something. Instead of dealing with those emotions directly, we often allow them to fester and skew our outlook. 

Unfortunately, as we grow cynical toward one thing in our lives, we often cast that negativity onto everything. Walt Disney made a wise observation: “I always like to look on the optimistic side of life, but I am realistic enough to know that life is a complex matter.” The complexity of modern challenges cannot be dismissed or overcome merely by denying that they are threatening. However, research published in the Journal of Personality found “positive emotions contribute to psychological and physical well-being via more effective coping.” In other words, as we discover better means of coping with adverse circumstances, positive feelings can make us more resilient. 

As we enter the holiday season, there will be plenty of opportunities to test our coping skills. One example is a wife who becomes impatient with her husband, who is taking too long to get ready for their Thanksgiving trip. While enroute, he remembers he forgot the camera she intended to use to capture new family pictures. Her hostility toward her husband grows into a cynical attitude that she carries throughout the gathering with family and friends. As a result, the entire holiday with her husband and family is a disaster. 

Adopting a negative outlook influences how we react to and treat others. In this case, before she even arrived at her destination, this woman thought to herself, “I would never have made him wait; he is so inconsiderate,” and “I guess he really doesn’t care if we get pictures of the family. I care more than he does about us all being together.”

According to clinical psychologist Dr. Lisa Firestone, cynicism is often our reflection of our negative perception of ourselves. As a defense, we project those negative feelings onto those around us. In these situations, we end up sabotaging otherwise joyful events and emotionally hurting ourselves. 

To take a different course, we must be sensitive to ourselves and notice what we are experiencing. Compassion fights cynicism by freeing us to be curious, open, accepting and loving toward ourselves. When we feel safe and secure in ourselves, we can easily express compassion toward others. 

Some simple reminders to avoid cynicism are:

• Recognize that everyone struggles. 

• When someone hurts us emotionally, they are acting in defense, indicating they are hurting. 

• Remember that others are suffering more than you.

• Everyone has shortcomings.

Dr. Firestone continues, “Compassion counters cynicism by allowing us to feel our anger, pain or frustration without taking these feelings to a dark place that bends both us and those close to us out of shape.” 

We create the emotional world we live in by cultivating compassion instead of becoming cynical. Compassion permits us to feel fulfilled while feeling closer to those we love. 

This holiday season let’s be open and understanding and leave our destructive attitudes in the past. 

It will allow us to enjoy the season while bringing out the best in those around us.

Letter to the Editor

Editor:

The members of the Leisure World Baptist Church send their gratitude and great appreciation to the GRF Board, members and administration—with special thanks to the Recreation Department—for the diligence, hard work and compassion with which they have operated to reopen the Amphitheater for religious services.  

The road can be difficult, but the results can be blessed.

Phil Hood 

Deacon Board Chairman

Credits and Kudos

Credits & Kudos must include the writer’s name and mutual, and will be edited for brevity. Mention of a business or service is not an endorsement or recommendation by the LW Weekly or Golden Rain Foundation.

Mutual 1 resident Debbi Fudge would like to thank the marvelous Leisure World staff for once more going way beyond the call of duty. She emailed the library last week to get help sending a fax to a medical business. A library staffer responded, saying that the Leisure World Library cannot send faxes during the COVID-19 lockdown. And then that staffer went on to provide exemplary service. He let Debbi know where she could find a nearby fax machine. “My fax got sent that day, thanks to one of our marvelous library staffers.

Adair Paul of Mutual 12 would like to express how expertly Martin of MP Construction has been handling the remodeling of his home in Leisure World. He and his men were so helpful and caring with everything. After working all day, they cleaned, swept up the sawdust and made sure their tools were stowed. “They helped me move boxes, taking trash and boxes with them when they left for the day,” Paul said. “Martin always returned my calls and, answered and responded quickly. I would recommend his work as he is an excellent craftsperson. He knows what is needed, is fast and very fair in price.”

Letters Policy

Letters to the Editor should include your name, Mutual number and phone number, and be emailed to rutho_news@lwsb.com. Letters must be of general interest to the community and may contain opinions, suggestions, compliments and complaints without being scurrilous, libelous, defamatory, repetitive or otherwise inappropriate.


Waivers available for CalFresh clients

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) recently approved a request by the California Department of Social Services (CDSS) that allows current CalFresh households to purchase hot, prepared foods using their California Golden State electronic benefit transfer (EBT) card through Nov. 22, 2020. 

The request was made to help residents impacted by the recent wildfires and power outages who may not be able to store food or have access to cooking facilities.

The hot food waiver applies to 35 California counties, including Orange County.

Who is eligible?

 • All Orange County households and individuals who are currently receiving CalFresh benefits.

Where can hot food be purchased?

• To purchase hot, prepared foods with EBT cards, visit https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/retailer-locator for a list of authorized EBT retailers in their area.

For more information, or to check your EBT balance,  visit the CalFresh Benefits Helpline at (877) 847-3663 (FOOD).

For immediate food assistance, contact Orange County Food Bank at (714) 897-6670 or Second Harvest Food Bank of Orange County at (949) 653-2900.

Free Phone Service

Leisure World residents may qualify for a free cell phone or reduced monthly fees for landline service.

California LifeLine provides discounted home phone and cell phone services to qualified households. Only one California LifeLine discounted phone is allowed per household (except for teletypewriter users and for Deaf and Disabled Telecommunications Program participants). The California LifeLine discounts can only be for the individual’s primary residence. 

Each household must choose to get the discount either on a home phone or on a cell phone, but not on both. Households cannot get the discount from multiple phone companies. Qualifiers must renew annually to receive their discount. 

Free cell phones and service are provided through different carriers upon qualification. Cell phone providers can have varying data packages.

How to Qualify:

Residents may qualify for California Lifeline in one of two ways, either program-based or income-based. Documentation of proof of eligibility is required. Submit copies of proof of eligibility with the completed and signed application.

Examples:

Program-based qualification may include:

•Enrollment in Medi-Cal, LIHEAP, SSI, Cal Fresh, Federal Veterans and Survivors Pension Benefit programs.

•Income-based qualifications for a household size of up to two people is $28,700 (annual income limit equals gross income before taxes, including Social Security payments, pensions, etc.).

 For more information and assistance, contact California LifeLine at (866) 272-0349.

People who do not qualify for the LifeLine Program may qualify for senior discounts with a phone/cable/Internet company. Call your provider directly to inquire about senior discounts and/or eligibility for reduced fees for these services.

For more information or assistance with this program or others, contact GRF Member Resource Liaison Cindy Tostado, LCSW, at 431-6586, ext. 317. 

Fitness Center Registration

The newly remodeled Clubhouse 6 Fitness Center will have new procedures in place once it is cleared to open. People will need to re-register under the new, card-swipe system to use the new facility. To expedite this process, GRF members can go to the Recreation Department to pick up a release form or print one at home. 

The office is open between  8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays. People can pick up forms in Building 5 or print them at home. Digital forms can be found at www.lwsb.com/reserve. For a “Release of Future Claims Hazardous Activity” form, click the link under the exercising man icon.

To book an appointment to complete the registration, click on  the exercising man. A calendar will pop up, and people can select a day and time; appointments are available Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Members should bring their GRF ID cards and the completed form to appointments, which will be held on the first floor of Clubhouse 6.

Photos will be taken, and a barcode will be added to ID cards.

This process will only register members for future use of the Fitness Center, which is not yet open. Watch the LW Weekly and LW Live for updates indicating when the facility will open and how to reserve workout times.

2-1-1: Help is a call away

by Cindy Tostado, LCSW

GRF member resources/assistance liaison

211 OC is a free, confidential HelpLine that connects people across North America with the local resources they need. 

By calling 2-1-1, 888-600-4357 (toll free) or  (949) 646-4357 (local) you will be connected to a trained Information and Referral Specialist. 

He or she can help you navigate your situation by assessing your needs and linking you to the most appropriate resource in your community.  

Service is available 24/7 and offered in over 170 languages.

Examples of resources may include but are not limited to bills/financial support, food, crisis services, transportation, mental health, substance abuse, legal assistance and housing.

Government

GRF Meetings 

Golden Rain Foundation committee and board meetings are open to Leisure World residents. The following is a tentative schedule (meetings are dependent on orders related to COVID-19; check schedules for latest information). Public health and safety measures will be in place to protect membership and staff, with limited in-person seating at Clubhouse 4. Physical distancing and wearing a face mask are required.

Thurs., Nov. 12 Special Architectural Design & Review

Conference Room B 10 a.m.

Thurs., Nov. 12 Communications/IT Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Friday, Nov. 13 GRF Executive Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Mon., Nov. 16 Finance Committee

Clubhouse 4 10 a.m.

Tues., Nov. 17 Website Ad Hoc Committee

virtual 1 p.m.

Thurs., Nov. 19 AB 3182 Ad Hoc Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 24 GRF Board Monthly Meeting

Clubhouse 4 10 a.m.

Mon., Nov. 30 Special GRF Board Meeting

Clubhouse 4 10 a.m.

Wed., Dec. 2 Governing Document Committee

Clubhouse 4 10 a.m.

Wed., Dec. 2 Physical Property Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Thurs., Dec. 3 COVID-19 Ad Hoc Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Fri., Dec. 4 GRF Board Executive Session

virtual 1 p.m.

Mon., Dec. 7 Recreation Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Tues., Dec. 8 Architectural Design & Review

Clubhouse 4 10 a.m.

Wed., Dec. 9 Security, Bus & Traffic Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Thurs., Dec. 10 Communications/IT Committee

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Presidents’ Council Recap From Nov. 1

The regular monthly meeting of the Presidents’ Council of Seal Beach Leisure World was convened at 9:04 a.m. by President Jackie Dunagan, on Thursday, Nov. 5, in video-telephone conference.

The following is a recap of that meeting:

• The regular monthly council meeting minutes of Oct. 1 were approved by general consent of the council, as printed.

• Guest speakers Gary Yoshiba and Roy Herndon from the Orange County Water District provided an interpretation on how the manhole appeared in Mutual 9.

• Guest speakers Phil Mandeville, Kathy Almeida and Marty Williams provided information on being prepared during a disaster and on “Targeting COVID-19’s Spread Supplemental for Emergency Evacuation Gatherings during a Pandemic.”

• Facilities Director Mark Weaver provided information on members in compliance with fire inspections and guidelines the mutuals need to adhere to.

• Mutual Administration Director Jodi Hopkins introduced Terri Johnson as the new Stock Transfer Manager and provided an update on the Mutual Administration and Stock Transfer statistics for October 2020.

• Executive Director Randy Ankeny announced the North Gate is not expected to open until April 2021, with a partial lane opened for emergencies only.

• Ankeny mentioned there will be a second flu shot clinic.

• Ankeny mentioned there will be a cardboard art show on Dec. 18 in Clubhouses 3 and 4 and Veterans Plaza (drive through) and encourages all to participate, as there will be a prize.

• Ankeny mentioned he is forming a memo regarding a golf cart convoy that will have carolers bringing holiday cheer to the community and would like to let the mutuals know about it.

• Ankeny mentioned that the pandemic numbers have increased, and the community should continue to be mindful of this with the upcoming holidays by following directives of what may constitute as good food gifts and staying with safe food practices.

• Ankeny mentioned he will be presenting to the GRF master insurance policies.

• Ankeny mentioned the escrow fees.

• Portfolio Specialist Ripa Barua provided information on Zoom etiquette and gave a reminder that although participants are on Zoom, they should act if they are at an in-person meeting. They should limit distractions and be mindful of background noises; it is also important to limit the use of emoticons.

The next meeting of the Presidents’ Council is Dec. 3, at 11:01 a.m., via Clubhouse Four, Zoom and YouTube.

Carport Cleaning Schedule 2020

The remainder of the holiday carport cleaning schedule for 2020 is as follows:

Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 26

Mutual 11, Carports 130-131; Mutual 15, Carports 3, 6-8, 10-13; and Mutual 16, Carport 9, will be cleaned Monday, Nov. 30. 

Christmas Day, Friday, Dec. 25

Mutual 14, Carports 150-157; Mutual 15, Carports 1-2, will be cleaned Thursday, Dec. 31.

Street Sweeping

GRF trust streets are swept on the fourth Thursday of the month. Parked vehicles must be removed from trust streets before midnight the night before. 

Contact Mutual directors to find out when your carports are scheduled for sweeping.

Mutual Meetings 

Mutual residents are invited to attend the open meetings of their mutual boards (schedule subject to change). 

Thurs., Nov. 12 Mutual 12

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9 a.m.

Fri., Nov. 13 Mutual 3

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9 a.m.

Mon., Nov. 16 Mutual 15

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 1 p.m.

Tues., Nov. 17 Mutual 10 (rescheduled)

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9 a.m.

Tues., Nov. 17 Mutual 14

Clubhouse 4 1 p.m.

Wed., Nov. 18 Mutual 5

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9 a.m.

Wed., Nov. 18 Mutual 7

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 1 p.m.

Thurs., Nov. 19 Mutual 2

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9 a.m.

Thurs., Nov. 19 Mutual 11

virtual 1:30 p.m.

Fri., Nov. 20 Mutual 6

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9:30 a.m.

Mon., Nov. 23 Mutual 8 (open forum, 9 a.m.)

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9:30 a.m.

Tues., Nov. 24 Mutual 1 (rescheduled)

virtual 9 a.m.

Wed., Nov. 25 Mutual 10

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9 a.m.

Tues., Dec. 1 Mutual 16

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9:30 a.m.

Tues., Dec. 1 Mutual 17

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 1:30 p.m.

Wed., Dec. 9 Mutual 4 (open forum, 9:15 a.m.)

Clubhouse 4 and virtual 9:30 a.m.

Thurs., Dec. 10 Mutual 12

virtual 9 a.m.

Health & Fitness

Second flu shot clinic to be held Nov. 16

The first clinic the Health Care Center sponsored this fall was a tremendous success, with more than 1,100 GRF members taking advantage of the drive-through event. GRF has arranged for OptumCare to host a second event, and this one is free to all—even if your insurance does not cover it or you are not a member of OptumCare. 

The flu shot is more important than ever this year, and to help keep everyone safe and socially distanced, the Nov. 16 event will also be a drive-through flu clinic. Members should arrive at the Clubhouse 4 parking lot between 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Everyone will need to have a waiver—available at the Health Care Center, the Recreation Office in Building 5 and on Leisure World Buses—filled out prior to arrival, a picture ID and an insurance card. Wear a short-sleeved or sleeveless shirt and a face covering. 

There are assigned times for each mutual:

Mutuals 1 and 17: 8-8:45 a.m.

Mutuals 10 and 14: 8:45-9:30 a.m.

Mutuals 2 and 16: 9:30-10:15 a.m.

Mutuals 12 and 15: 10:15-11 a.m.

Mutuals 3 and 5: 11-11:45 a.m.

Mutuals 6 and 7: 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Mutuals 8 and 9: 12:30-1:15 p.m.

Mutuals 4 and 11: 1:15-2 p.m.

There will be signs and personnel to help guide traffic. 

For cars: Use the north entrance to access the clinic, held behind Clubhouse 4. After you get your shot, please exit onto Northwood Road.

For scooters, bikes, shuttles, golf carts and walk-up appointments: Enter off Northwood Road. Tables will be set up on the side of Clubhouse 4 closest to the roundabout. 

There is no cost for the regular flu shot for LW residents. High-dose flu shots are not available at this event.

Flu shots

Vaccine protects immune system

The Orange County Health Care Agency (HCA) continues to urge people to get a flu shot. While it doesn’t protect anyone from COVID-19, it will lower susceptibility to influenza, which can help to keep immune systems healthy. According to the CDC, getting vaccinated prevented approximately 4.4 million influenza illnesses during the 2018-2019 flu season. 

Only about half of Americans get an annual flu vaccine, according to the CDC. As people get older, their risk for severe illnesses increases. Though the CDC recommends getting the flu shot in September or October, county health officials stress it’s not too late. An uptick in flu cases generally begins in the fall and peaks sometime between December and February, but the season can last until May. The sooner a person can get the vaccine during flu season, the better protected he or she will be. 

The flu and COVID share some symptoms, including fever and body aches. Afflicted persons may not know right away which they have—or whether they’re experiencing both. 

HCA recommends Orange Countians continue following state and CDC guidelines: wearing a mask in public places or when visiting with those outside one’s household; avoiding touching eyes, noses and mouths; frequent handwashing with soap and water, or, if those items are unavailable, using hand sanitizer with 60 percent alcohol; maintaining a social distance of at least 6 feet; and staying home as much as possible. It further cautions that if people feel at all ill, they should stay away from others who might become infected.

“We encourage people to get their regular flu vaccine, and because the weather is getting colder, a lot of activity will move indoors, so we encourage people to be really careful and follow [public health guidelines],” Dr. Clayton Chau, director of the HCA and the county’s chief health officer, recently told the Orange County Board of Supervisors.

Leisure World residents can get a standard-dose flu shot Nov. 16 from OptumCare at the pop-up clinic held in the Clubhouse 4 parking lot, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. The vaccine is free even if their insurance does not cover it or they are not a member of OptumCare. Interested parties can call (562) 799-7071 for more information.

Free Flu Shots in Los Al

The City of Los Alamitos’ Recreation and Community Services Department is sponsoring a free flu shot clinic outside the Los Alamitos Community Center, 10911 Oak St., on Nov. 18 from 9-11 a.m. Reservations must be made via losalflushot.eventbrite.com; a face covering and paper copy of the reservation must be presented upon entry.

Hot Meals Drive Through Program

The Hot Meals Drive Through program is available for residents of Orange County’s District 2, which includes Leisure World Seal Beach. Participants must be aged 60 and older, single parents or unemployed individuals or have disabilities. 

There are three sites open one day per week at which people may pick up two dinner meals.

Qualified applicants must register in advance at www.ocmeals.com. Anyone requiring assistance in completing any step of the application process should email info@ocmeals.com or call (949) 335-7702.

Hearts and Hands United in Giving

Hearts and Hands United in Giving (HHUG) is a small, local nonprofit dedicated to helping the homeless in the LW community. HHUG accepts donations of clean, used towels, plus new, unopened, travel-size shampoo, soap or lotion. New socks are the only clothing donation that HHUG accepts. 

To donate, contact Linda Neer at (562) 430-3214 for pick up. Donations can also be left on her patio at Mutual 2, 48-A. To learn more about HHUG, visit www.hhug.org.

Global Market Kitchen Delivers 

Global Market Kitchen delivers groceries and prepared meals every Wednesday, 2-4 p.m., at Clubhouse 4 or to your apartment. Order via https://globalmarketkitchen.com or by calling (562) 661-9776. Customer service inquiries should be directed to globalmk.usa@gmail.com.

Healthy eating

Avoid overeating during the holiday season

As the temperatures drop and the madness of the holidays set in, it’s important to keep health objectives in sight. Along with the fun of Thanksgiving, Hannukah and Christmas, there are the dangers of excess food and stress. That may hold especially true as the nation continues to struggle with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Experts say the best way to combat holiday overload is to minimize stress, plan ahead and get plenty of rest. But how?

Keep Active: Increase fitness routines, especially in the days leading up to a big meal, such as Thanksgiving. Get exercise in during early afternoon hours, when there’s still plenty of sun and temperatures are more comfortable. 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate: While it’s tempting to reach for a hot cup of tea, coffee or spiced cider, don’t ignore the body’s need for water. According to the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, an adequate daily fluid intake amounts to about 15.5 cups of fluids a day for men and 11.5 cups for women. And most of that should be water, consumed regularly over the course of the day. After all, between 40 percent and 70 percent of the human adult body is made up of H2O.

Don’t Skip Meals: Some people who are anticipating a large meal will forgo an earlier meal, thinking it will all balance out. But nutritionists say this is the wrong tactic to take. “When people skip meals, they feel like they’re owed something later in the day, so they tend to overeat at their next meal,” registered dietitian/nutritionist Bonnie Taub-Dix told Prevention magazine last year. “But if you split up your meals throughout the course of the day, your body is able to use those nutrients more efficiently.” 

Trim Calories: Cut back on dishes sides heavy on sugar or fat, especially for those big holidays. Consider mashed sweet potatoes or even mashed cauliflower in place of mashed potatoes. Instead of the usual green bean casserole made with canned cream of mushroom soup, steam fresh green beans or stir-fry them in a little olive oil with a dash of salt and pepper. Fresh cranberry sauce is better than canned—and it’s packed with antioxidants! 

Prioritize: Nutritionists recommend concentrating on lean proteins (like the white meat from turkey breasts) and making veggies the star of any meal. For special-occasion foods (i.e., richer, more calorie-laden dishes), take no more than what would fit in an ice cream scoop. 

Eat Slowly: Studies published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest chewing foods slowly and mindfully allows a body to release hormones in the gut and brain that tell a person they are full with less food and help them digest better. So savoring a meal makes it more satisfying. And by waiting just 10 minutes after clearing a plate, the need for second helpings decreases exponentially. 

Don’t Dine Alone: If possible, enjoy meals with someone, whether in person or via FaceTime or Zoom. Socializing lifts spirits—and not so much forks.

Meals on Wheels, Long Beach

Meals on Wheels of Long Beach Inc. delivers freshly cooked meals Monday through Friday, between 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Deliveries include a hot dinner, cold lunch, dessert and an 8 ounce carton of 1 percent milk. The cold lunch may be an entrée salad or a sandwich with a small side salad. An alternate dessert is available for those on a diabetic diet. Contact Caron Adler at (562) 439-5000, ext. 2, or visit www.mowlb.org to complete an online application. To cancel a meal for the following day, you must contact Adler before 9 a.m. the prior business day. Menu is subject to change without notice. Additional Thanksgiving meals are available by calling Adler by Nov. 19.

Thursday, Nov. 12: Turkey chili, cornbread, and green beans with pimentos; apple sauce; chicken-salad sandwich, with spinach, tomato and pickle, plus cucumber, red onion and dill salad. 

Friday, Nov. 13: Baked breaded fish with tarter sauce, macaroni and cheese, and seasoned broccoli; tapioca pudding; entrée Chinese chicken salad, with mandarin oranges, cabbage, carrots, onion and Asian dressing. 

Monday, Nov. 16: Roast beef with mushroom gravy, garlic-and-chive mashed potatoes, and creamed spinach; Waldorf salad; egg-salad sandwich, with spinach and tomato, plus Italian pasta salad.

Tuesday, Nov. 17: Turkey à la king, biscuit, and Brussels sprouts; cheesecake; entrée turkey-and-ham cobb salad, with egg, tomato, bacon and blue cheese dressing, plus crackers.

Wednesday, Nov. 18: Curry chicken, brown and wild rice, and green bean alandine; fresh orange; ham, turkey and cheese sandwich, with lettuce, tomato and pickle, plus homemade potato salad.

LW Walking Trails

Regular brisk walking can help people maintain a healthy weight; prevent or manage various conditions, including heart disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes; strengthen bones and muscles; and improve mood, balance and coordination. The Recreation Department has a Leisure World Walking Trails brochure featuring seven measured trails throughout the community. Stop by the Downtown Café and pick one up. For more information, contact kathyt@lwsb.com.

Leisure Bikers

Sunday Leisure Bikers ride to Long Beach Municipal Golf Course and have breakfast, then continue to El Dorado park for a 2-mile hike at the Nature Center. There are also rides on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. All are invited to join; helmets, safe shoes and masks are a must. Call Mary Romero at (562) 810-4266 for more information.

Balance & Stability Class

A Landmark Balance & Stability class is offered on Saturdays, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., on Zoom. Instructor Adrianne Rosenfeld teaches the free, 40-minute class that focuses on balance, shifting weight and cognizant activities. It broadcasts at around 4:20-4:40 p.m. every day on the Spectrum Cable Channel 1390, right after the Queen Kong interview and is available on youtube.com.

Rosenfeld is certified in Zumba, Zumba Gold, Silver Sneakers, and Balance & Stability. She also has certification from the Fitness Aging Institute and an ACE Group exercise certificate. Join the Zoom meeting by visiting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84982522530; the Meeting ID is 849 8252 2530. For more information, email arosenfeld1@verizon.net.

Zumba and Dance Fitness Clubs

Get off the couch! There are two low-impact dance clubs you can join, both of which meet at Veterans Park. Zumba Club meets on Mondays at 4 p.m., and the Dance Fitness Club comes together on Thursdays at 8:30 a.m. Both are free during the pandemic. For more information, contact Jim Blanchard at (714) 487-2446.


Arts & Leisure

Virtual painting classes feed your creativity

Feel the need for a new creative outlet? Guided painting classes can get you started on a new path. Or maybe you’re already a seasoned painter, but you need some new ideas. Taking a class, whether in person or online, can get your creative brain ticking in new directions. You can make something new to compliment the season, or you can create something to give as a gift (Hanukkah and Christmas are just around the corner!). Here are some fun opportunities to stretch your skills:

Crescent Bay: The Paint Sesh’s Chelz Franzer believes “home is where the art is,” and for this interactive class, she hopes that’s where the fun is, too. During the 1.5-hour, Nov. 15 session, she’ll guide you through the steps to make your own version of a crescent moon floating over a purply landscape. (A Nov. 19 class will paint “Serene Autumn,” a yellow, leafy tree over a riverscape.) The website (https://thepaintsesh.com) provides details on the supplies you’ll need, as well as where to buy them, and it’s where you can pay the $15 fee. 

The Joy of Painting Donuts: Chloe Allred leads this two-hour online workshop, in which you’ll capture the special delight of the breakfast treat, from the doughy ring to the sugary glaze and colorful sprinkles. You’ll learn how to prepare for painting and arrange still-lifes, palette mixing techniques, and proper paint application. Sign up for the Nov. 21 class via the Brea Gallery’s website at https://www.breaartgallery.com/events. The required supply list, with recommended paint colors, can also be found online. The cost for the class is $40 per person. 

Aurora Reflections: Pinot’s Palette has five Orange County franchise locations, two of which offer virtual painting sessions. On Nov. 14, the Tustin franchise will showcase the beauty of the natural phenomenon that’s known for the appearance of reddish and greenish streaks of light near the north and south poles. You’ll create a unique aurora reflecting in a serene lake surrounded by trees with an Art Kit that can be picked up from the studio. The kit includes everything you’ll need: a canvas, brushes, paint, palette plates, a water cup, even a disposable apron and paper towels. The class and the kit are $30, but if you choose to use your own supplies, the cost for the class is just $10. And if you miss anything because of technical difficulties, a recording of the class is available for seven days after the event. Register at https://www.pinotspalette.com/tustin.

Toot Sweet Autumn: If you’d prefer an in-person class, Pinot’s Palette’s Huntington Beach location has an outdoor area that’s perfect for painting. At this Nov. 15 class, you’ll surround the brand’s darling Toot Sweet Birds with reminders of autumn. Masks are required for entry and when engaging with staff members, and social distancing and other COVID-19 safety protocols will be enforced. All supplies are included in the $39 class fee. For more details, visit https://www.pinotspalette.com/huntingtonbeach.

Grab ’n’ Go Meals

Nov. 12-18 

Clubhouse 6 Parking Lot

• Thursday: Domino’s Pizza—call ahead for special orders, wings and salads offered, 3-7 p.m., cash/cards, (562) 493-2212. Mandi’s Candies Ice Cream Truck, 4-7 p.m.

• Friday: Katella Deli—extensive menu includes deli favorites, appetizers, salads, hot entrées; specials of the day available onsite, 3:30-5:30 p.m., cash/cards. Call ahead at (562) 594-8611, or order online at www.katellabakery.com.

• Saturday: Berg Catering—freshly prepared meals with a healthy, gourmet touch, 3:30-5:30 p.m., PayPal/checks/cash/cards. Preorder at (562) 663-2038 or www.bergcatering.com (click the special LW menu). 

• Sunday: Lucille’s Smokehouse Bar-B-Que—barbecue, salads, sandwiches, 4-6 p.m., no preorders.

 • Monday: Messi Burgers—burgers, sausage, chicken, wings and sides, 4-6 p.m., cash/cards. Visit https://messiburgers.com for more info.

• Tuesday: Taco Tuesday—Mexican favorites, plus hot dogs, burgers and fries, 5-7 p.m., cash/cards, no preorders.

• Wednesday: Gourmet Renee—American cuisine, homemade soups and desserts, 4-6 p.m., cash/cards. Preorder by calling (323) 833-1213. 

•••

 All Grab ’n’ Go events take place rain or shine. If it rains or is too hot, people line up inside Clubhouse 6. Everyone should maintain a 6-foot distance, and masks are required. For information, call (562) 431-6586, ext. 398.

On-call bus service is available weekdays from 4:30 p.m., when regular service ends; weekends are on-call at any time. Call (562) 431-6586, ext. 379. For more information or to make a suggestion, call (562) 431-6586, ext. 379.

Watch for LW Live! alerts for daily menus. Sign up for LW Live at http://www.lwsb.com/lw-live-sign-up/. Vendors are subject to change.

Orange County Public Libaries

Though most branches of the Orange County Public Libraries have reopened after months of closure because of the coronavirus emergency, there are restrictions in place to comply with county and state guidelines. still numerous resources available.

Curbside Pick-Up

Contactless service allows you to pick up items from the library without any physical contact. Simply place items on hold via https://catalog.ocpl.org. When you receive notice that they are available for you, drive to the OC Public Libraries branch you chose (the closest is the Los Alamitos-Rossmoor Library at 12700 Montecito, Seal Beach), call the number on the sign outside, then wait for a staff member to place your items on the table near your car. The service is available Tuesdays through Thursdays, noon-6 p.m., and Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Grab & Go 

If you want to peruse in person, designated areas allow for a select number of visitors to browse the library’s collection. Single-user computer stations are also available Tuesday through Thursday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., and Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; one-hour reservations can be made via https://www.ocpl.org. All visitors must wear face masks and practice social distancing. 

Virtual Book Groups

The Seal Beach Library’s Thursday Adult Book Club meets the fourth Thursday of every month at 10 a.m. Contact Amy Johnson at amy.johnson@occr.ocgov.com for more information and the link to access online meetings. 

Free Audio and Ebooks

Readers with an OC Public Libraries card can check out audio and ebooks through the online Overdrive and Libby apps. (To get a card, go to https://catalog.ocpl.org/client/en_US/default/search/registration/$N/TEST/true.) Through these apps on your cellphone or tablet, you can find audiobooks and ebooks, check them out, download them, and access them. You can keep track of your reading history, and all your loans and holds are consolidated in a single place, with positions and notes synced across all your devices. Libby can also send books to Kindle for people who like to read on that device.

Overdrive and Libby are available for download from either the Apple App Store for iPhones or Google Play for androids. 

If you need help getting set up, there are a number of helpful videos posted at https://ocpl.org/elibrary/virtual-programs/how-videos. 

Hui O Hula dancers and band appreciate the opportunity to practice their crafts during uncertain times. Instructor Jojo Weingart thanks Sara Park (front l-r) and Gee Gee Kwok for their devotion to hula. Both have been dancing and performing for more than a decade. Kudos also goes to malihini (newcomer) Nam Bui, a.k.a.Nancy, (second row, left) for her sunny disposition; she is a great addition to LW’s hula family. What a joy it is to watch soon-to-be-97-year-old Leona Hasegawa (second row, right) dance. Leona has been with Hui O Hula since 2006, and as the eldest in class, she is an inspiration for all here in LW. Free hula lessons happen at Veterans Plaza every Thursday afternoon at 2; Christmas hula are now being taught. Everyone is welcome to “walk in, hula out” on Nov. 17; dancers and band will meet by 3 p.m. in Mutual 15 by Building 41. Call Kaye Huff at 431-2242 for class information or to book a hula show “on the green” for the holidays.

Men’s Golf League Results

The Men’s Monday Golf League played Nov. 2 at the Meadowlark Golf Course in Huntington Beach, a par-70, 5,800-yard, 18-hole course. Eleven men and one woman, plus two guests, were challenged by a damp morning and recently aerated/sanded greens. Despite the wet fairways and greens, there were two birdies. However, scores were generally over par.

All scores are net (actual score minus handicap). A Flight handicaps range from 0 -20, with B flight higher than 20.

A Flight Winners: First place: Bill McKusky, 1 under 69, plus a birdie, closest to the pin on the 150-yard, par-3 seventh hole, and fewest putts; second: Sam Choi, plus a birdie and closest to the pin on the 150-yard, par-3 16th hole; third: Fujio Norihiro; fourth: Ron Jackson; fifth: Dave LaCascia; sixth: John Petersen.

B Flight Winners: First place: tie between Bob Munn and John Meyer, 2 over 72; second: Tom Ross; third: Keiko Sekino.

The Men’s Friday Golf League played at Willowick Golf Course in Santa Ana on Nov. 6. Seven men teed off into a beautiful but cool morning on the scenic, water-hazard-free, par-71, nearly 6,000-yard course. The sun came out briefly, and conditions were excellent for the start of the morning’s golf. Since rain and wind were expected later, the clouds rolled in, so the sun was absent for the latter half of the round. As such, most scores were above par, and there was only one birdie.

A Flight Winners: First place: tie between Fujio Norihiro and Bill McKusky, 2 under 69; second: Sam Choi; third: Gene Veseley. In addition to a birdie, McKusky had fewest putts and was closest to the pin on the 150-yard, par-3 seventh hole. Choi was closest to the pin on the 150-yard, par-3 fourth hole.

B Flight Winners: First place: Bob Munn, 4 under 67, second: John Meyer; third: Tom Ross, plus fewest putts.

Both the Monday and Friday Golf Leagues play at four local courses, all within 15 minutes of Leisure World, starting between 7 and 7:30 a.m., except holidays. The courses are David L. Baker in Fountain Valley, Meadowlark in Huntington Beach, Riverview in Santa Ana, and Willowick in Garden Grove. LW Men’s Club membership is not required, and friends, ladies, spouses and family are all welcome to play and/or join. There is a prize pool for each round that players are not obligated to enter. Prizes are awarded for low gross in each flight, birdies, closest to the pin on two par-3s, and lowest number of putts in each flight. Holes-in-One and eagles, although infrequent, are generously rewarded.If interested, contact Bill McKusky (562) 430-8618 or Dave LaCascia (801) 674-5975.

The league is looking for golfers (men and women) to join during the reduced playing time we currently endure. Handicaps can be determined using the local course handicap numbers and adjusted for the longer, more difficult courses outside Leisure World. Contact LaCascia for more information.

—Dave LaCascia

Technology Classes by Miryam

Miryam Fernandez’s technology classes are taught on Tuesdays at 2 p.m. Topics change each week. For an invitation, email Fernandez at mzzmimm@gmail.com. If you need help setting up a microphone and/or video or have other connectivity issues, call Bonnie Cooper at (562) 822-6358 before class begins.

Important Reminder

Apple, Microsoft, IRS, Social Security, etc., will never contact you by phone, text or email. If there’s a problem with your account, they will shut you down until you contact them.

Tech Talk

Join Bob Cohen in a one-hour live Zoom class on technology every Friday at 10 a.m. Topics are different each week and include iPhones and apps, websites, home-office technology, and Internet marketing. A question-and-answer session is held during each class, and all you need to know in advance is how to join using Zoom. All sessions are free.

Registration information with optional reading material is sent out every Wednesday morning for the Friday Tech Talk. To register for the weekly newsletter, sign up at https://bit.ly/bobologynewsletter or contact bob@bobology.com.

Cool Cardboard Creations Contest

With more people taking advantage of having everything delivered to their homes, mounds of recyclable cardboard boxes have been multiplying, even in Leisure World Seal Beach, where another mutual could possibly be built from discarded shipping materials.

Instead of tossing those cardboard containers, reuse and repurpose boxes and scraps for a chance to win fabulous prizes in the Cool Cardboard Creations Contest. The building material has been around for more than 200 years and has sparked innovative uses from the practical to the ambitious, including a car constructed by Lexus made of 1,700 precision-cut pieces. The possibilities are endless!

Submissions must be 95 percent cardboard. Acceptable materials include cardboard of all types (e.g., delivery boxes and egg cartons), fasteners, glue, tape, as well as any nontoxic paint and recyclable decorations. 

The maximum size allowable for tabletop displays is 24 inches wide, 24 inches deep and 36 inches high. For floor displays, it’s 36 inches wide, 36 inches deep and 72 inches high. And for hanging displays, it’s 36 inches by 36 inches.

Excess cardboard can be dropped off in the designated area on the east side of Clubhouse 6. Anyone needing more building materials is welcome to take from this area.

Individual entries, as well as collaborative efforts made by GRF clubs or departments, should be brought to the LW Library by Dec. 16 between 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Projects will be judged based on originality and the use of the star material: cardboard! 

The first-place winner will receive $1,000, second place gets $500, and third place $250. Special category winners will be awarded prizes valued between $50-$100.

Creations will be featured in a drive-through display on Dec. 18 near Clubhouses 3 and 4 and Veterans Plaza.

For more information, contact Kathy Thayer at kathyt@lwsb.com, or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 398.

Connecting with the LW Weekly

The Leisure World Weekly office is closed to the public in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. Editors can be reached by phone and email. See page 4 of any edition for editors’ addresses or send emails to rutho_news@lwsb.com. People may drop articles and classified ads into the letter slot at the front of the News Building. The editorial deadline is Thursday for the following Thursday’s edition. All classified and display advertising will be accepted by telephone at (562) 430-0534; deadline is Monday at 2:30 p.m.

Video Producers Club 

These programs are televised during the month of November on SBTV 3, community Seal Beach television. The station can be seen on Spectrum Cable channel 3 and Frontier Cable channel 37, as well as on the internet at www.sbtv3.org (click on the logo to see it in high definition). The programming is contributed by certified Video Producers community volunteers who are not employees of SBTV 3.

Classical Music: Sponsored by the Sunshine Club, Classical Music was performed in Clubhouse 2 in October 2018, with Howard Choi acting as the master of ceremonies. The one-hour program’s camera operators were Paul Bassett, Irene Cistaro and Michael Oh, who was also the video producer.

Halloween Scarefest: In this treasured October 2010 program dredged up from the hallowed video archives, Terry Otte and Abilene perform finely crafted rock and country tunes for the ghastly ghouls and wicked witches flying about. Join them in the frolic of a Halloween Scarefest where there is no need to provide any candy; just make a bowl of popcorn, sit back and enjoy the show. Cameras operated by Mary Apte, Joe Osuna, Bob Slater and David Noble. Audio mixed and video produced, directed and edited by Bassett.

Music Around the World: Cabaret Entertainers present this concert, featuring selected music from such locations as France, Italy, Ireland, Jamaica, Canada, Brazil, Japan, USA and more. It was held in Clubhouse 4 on March 24, 2017, and originally broadcast in April of that year. Vocalists include: Tommy Williams, producer; Bette Fritz; Charlie Guggino; Tosca Lies; Judy Duvall; and special vocalist Marcia Ford. Cameras operated by Oh, Richard Houck and Bassett. Anna Derby was the video production coordinator, and the video was produced by Bassett. 

The Autumn Quarantine Show: For this one-hour show, Eric and Sandy Nelson set up two cell phones and and one iPad to record themselves playing and singing autumn-themed songs in September. Osuna was the video producer.

Exercise and Physical Play: Anne Seifert, epidemiologist, M.P.H., Ph.D., discusses a section from her book “Good Health at Hand: Your Own Lifelong Way to Eat, Exercise and Meditate” with participants in a Zoom meeting. The half-hour presentation covers how important exercises and physical play are in this pandemic. The video producer is Osuna

Flamingo Party: This one-hour program features Ellen Brannigan’s birthday party a few years ago. The featured entertainers were the Hui O Hula, directed by Jojo Weingart. Cameras operated by Bonnie Z. Cooper and Osuna

Pickleball: For this short video on Pickleball in Leisure World, Owen Hughes was the camera operator and video producer.

Rocky Mountains: In this short video, Hughes tours points of interest found in the Rocky Mountains. Hughes is also the camera operator and video producer.

Mariachi San Jose Real: In 2019, the Spanish Club hosted the Mariachi San Jose Real band for this one-hour presentation. Camera operators are Joe and Oralia Osuna; Joe is also the video producer. 

North Seal Beach Community Center: The 15-minute video features Derby with city staff and others at the North Seal Beach Community Center explaining the serving of food. Oh was the camera operator and video producer.

—Joe Osuna

Feng Shui Zoom Workshops 2021

At one its last meetings, the Where-We-Live Club discussed the concept of Feng Shui Arts to help beautify and organize personal spaces. It was such a success that the group decided to expand on the subject in 2021 with “Let’s Put Our Affairs in Order and Organize!” 

“It is not easy for us to live with the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic,” says club president Leslie Parker of Mutual 12. “But it is also an appropriate time to take advantage of this opportunity.” 

Those interested in learning more about the art of placement and how it may change their lives should email wherewelive@yahoo.com. Doing so will also place them on a mailing list for a future workshops, as well as updates to the club’s calendar of activities, Zoom meetings and HomeWorks. New and previous members, as well as all curious shareholders, are welcome to join.

The Theater Club recently completed “Around Leisure World 2020,” a Janice Laine Production, with the finale “Together (Wherever We Go).” To view the 18-minute spoof of how LWers have been spending their lives during the COVID quarantine features, go to https://youtu.be/FbJEzR4J9qo or check listings for Superwire Channel 1390 and SBTV 3 (after Dec. 1).  

Video Producers Zoom Meetings

The Video Producers Club offers free, weekly Zoom classes, as well as a Zoom Party Social on Saturdays.

Classes are as follows:

• Monday, 10 a.m.: Intermediate Zoom class for Windows and Android users with host Joe Osuna. For an invite to his class, email joosuna29a@gmail.com.

• Monday, 2 p.m.: Zoom class for iPad and Mac users hosted by Fred Carpenter. For an invite to his class, email sail1942@gmail.com.

• Wednesday, 10 a.m.: Beginners’ Zoom class for Windows and Android users with Osuna. For an invite to this class, email joosuna29a@gmail.com.

• Thursday, 10 a.m.: Beginners’ Zoom class for Windows and Android users and for beginning Video Producers with host Joseph Valentinetti. For an invite to his class, email 0501042@gmail.com.

• Friday, 10 a.m.: Guest lecturer Bob Cohen hosts Friday Morning Tech Talk on a variety of topics. Email bob@bobology.com for an invite.

• Saturday, 5 p.m.: The one-hour Zoom Party Social, hosted by Joseph Valentinetti, is open to all residents. For an invite, email 0501042@gmail.com.

—Joe Osuna

Family Radio Service Users

Calling all Family Radio Service Users in Leisure World: The Radio Club provides an opportunity for a Family Radio Service (FRS) practice drill every Wednesday morning. Anyone who has an FRS radio is invited to participate. 

The call-in time is 9:30-9:45 a.m. on Channel 13/0. Be sure to wait until the radio is clear, then call in stating your first name, last name initial and mutual number. Remember to press the side button to speak, then release when finished.

For more instruction on the use of the FRS radio, contact Leisure World Radio Club President Rich Erickson at rjerxn@yahoo.com, or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 409, to leave a message.

LW Library Curbside Pick Up

Despite the limitations imposed by the fight against COVID-19, LW Library staff continues its innovative curbside pick-up program.

To schedule your pick-up, call the library at (562) 598-2431, Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., or email LWLibrary@lwsb.com. Include your name, library card number, phone number, and what kinds of materials you like to read and/or watch.

Staff members will do their best to accommodate specific requests. If the requested material is not available, they will use their expertise to find similar items.

Due to limited staffing, it could take up to 48 hours, excluding weekends, to fill requests.

You will receive a call when your material is ready for curbside pick-up Tuesday through Friday. 

If you have yet to visit and get your own library card number, call for a temporary one until the library reopens.

Residents can still use the library’s Wi-Fi while practicing social distancing outside of the building each day.

As always, the health and safety of our patrons and staff are our priority.

The LW Library was closed March 16, and on-site programs and events were canceled until further notice.

In the meantime, the library has also implemented the following: 

• Due dates for all currently checked-out books were extended, and late fees were been suspended until further notice.

• Items may be returned to the outdoor drop boxes at any time. 

• The library has created a new protocol for cleaning books (while it always cleaned books and media, cleaning and disinfecting procedures have been stepped up).

• Staff is still available to answer questions via phone or email Tuesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

—Library Operations Supervisor Vanessa Morris

Friends of Library Bag of Books Program

The Friends of the Library has a Bag of Books program for people who love to read. Call (714) 350-7682 and request a specific genre or author, and volunteers will do their best to fill a bag for $5. The bookstore is still closed, and there is no more storage space. Residents are asked to hold onto their donations until the bookstore reopens.

LW Poetry

This feature showcases original poems by members of the Creative Writers Club of Leisure World and other GRF members. 

That Old Feeling

Children, job, friends, lovers, I have a good life now

But I ache for the missing pieces I would disavow

I bear always within me my 16-year-old self

Ever painful memories of being left on the shelf

All subsequent acceptance through the long years

Does nothing to wash away bitter teen tears

We think we can outrun that adolescent angst

But it has left its imprint on our data banks

Recllections will rise on our happiest day

To stir the old feelings we thought we buried away

I have a good life, but comes that memory bomb

I must live with the fact that I missed senior prom

 

                             Toby Richman

                             Mutual 7

Religion, pages 8-10

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

By Jim Greer

LW contributor

In her Sunday morning address during the October General Conference, Lisa L. Harkness of the Primary General Presidency presented the topic “Peace, Be Still.” Harkness emphasized the savior’s teachings regarding how “to feel peace and calm even when the winds blow fiercely around usand billowing waves threaten to sink our hopes.”

Whether old or young, we can plead with the Lord during difficult times “Help me!” “Save me!” “Please, answer my prayer!”

Harkness retold a story from the book of Mark of Jesus preaching from the deck of a ship to a large crowd seated on the shore. When the evening came, and the multitude dispersed, Jesus instructed his disciples to take the vessel to the other side of the Sea of Galilee. Feeling weary, Jesus laid down in the back of the ship and fell asleep. The Scripture records “there arose a great storm of wind, and the waves beat into the ship so that it was nearly full (of water).”

Though many of his trusted disciples were experienced fishermen, the rage of the storm frightened them. And, fearing they would sink, they awakened Jesus, saying, “Master, carest thou not that we perish? Lord, save us: we perish.”

As the Scripture recalls, Jesus stood and rebuked the wind and sea, saying, “‘Peace, be still.’ And the wind did cease, and there was a great calm.” 

Lovingly teaching his disciples a critical lesson, Christ asked, “Why are ye so fearful? Where is your faith?”

As mortals, we naturally cry to Heaven when faced with fearful trials. Just as the Prophet Joseph Smith did while in Liberty Jail, exclaimed, “O God, where art thou? And where is the pavilion that covereth thy hiding place?”

The savior understands our mortal frailties and teaches us how to feel peace and calm. To those with even little faith, Jesus invites, “Come unto me. Believe on my name. Learn of me, and listen to my words.”

The savior kindly instructs us to “Repent and be baptized in my name. Love one another, as I have loved you” and “always remember me.” His message of assurance is “in me, ye might have peace. In the world, ye shall have tribulation: but be of good cheer; I have overcome the world.”

Harkness continued, “In times of turmoil, our faith can feel stretched to the limits of our endurance and understanding.”  But, even in the most challenging journeys, our faith is both tried and fortified.

Trials are an opportunity to increase our faith in Jesus Christ and follow his teachings to “believe rather than doubt, forgive rather than judge, repent rather than rebel.”

This troublesome world is not our final, eternal destination. As followers of Jesus Christ, we have faith in his power and hope in his promises. Harkness concluded, “He is in our boat! He has given his life so that you and I will not perish. Trust him, obey his commandments, and with faith, hear him say, ‘Peace, be still.’”

Assembly of God

First in-person service is this Sunday at the Amphitheater

By Normal Ballinger

LW contributor

Members of the Assembly of God will gather in the Amphitheater on Sunday at 11 a.m. for an hour of praise and worship. Associate Pastor Dan Ballinger will lead worship, and Pastor Sam Pawlak will bring another uplifting message of hope and promise from the word of God.  Do not arrive prior to 10:45 to allow the staff to sanitize the area, and make sure to enter from the lower level on the east side. Wearing a mask at all times is mandatory. We are so grateful that the GRF has opened this facility for worship.

In reading through Jeremiah,  I am so impressed by this prophet.  What he wrote and how he lived are a single piece.  Some people write better than they live or visa versa, but for Jeremiah, it’s all the same. 

Why is this important? 

We find that living through difficult times causes us to want to have trustworthy help in knowing what to think, how to pray and how to carry on. We would like some verification and credentials in our leaders. The book of Jeremiah provides just that. His life spanned one of the most troublesome times in Hebrew history.  He stuck it out, endured suffering, and made it through storms of hostility and bitter doubt.

Christians facing difficult situations today can take comfort in Jeremiah 29:11, knowing that it is not a promise to rescue us immediately from hardship or suffering, but rather that God has a plan for our lives. He can work through it to prosper us and give us hope and a future. 

Pastor Sam continues to preach on Facebook every Sunday morning at 10; these are words of encouragement and hope in a troubled world.  

Beit HaLev

Beit HaLev and Rabbi Galit Shirah invite all to attend the Zoom services every Shabbat evening and morning. Anyone who wants to join the Beit HaLev Zoom community for services or Hebrew classes should contact the rabbi at (562) 715-0888 for access and instructions on how to use Zoom.  

Rabbi Galit Shirah started a Coffee Chavurah (social hour) on Zoom on Fridays starting at 5:30 p.m., as well as after the Saturday morning services. For a link to the Coffee Chavurah, call or email the rabbi.

Beit HaLev continues to livestream on Facebook as well. To attend, go to Rabbi Galit Shirah’s website at galityomtov.com, Facebook.com/galityomtov or YouTube.com (Shabbat Shalom LIVE! Channel).  Evening services begin at 6, and morning services begin at 10:30. A link to the PDF version of each prayerbook, “Lev L’Lev,” is provided at each service.

“Chayei Sarah” ([the] Life of Sarah) is the name of this week’s Torah portion. Ironically, it is the account of Sarah’s death and the emergence of Rivka (Rebecca), the woman who would become Isaac’s wife and Avraham’s daughter-in-law.  Avraham realizes that his son—and heir —must begin to build the family that will become “a great nation.”  He sends his servant to find a wife for his son. Rivka surpasses all expectations with her kindness and hospitality, and upon returning to Avraham’s encampment, she reignites the light that had gone out of their tent—and their lives—when Sarah died.

Rabbi Galit Shirah conducts a weekday Ma’ariv service every Thursday for Sim Shalom, the online synagogue.  Sim Shalom presents livestream services Monday-Thursday, with a different rabbi each day. To say Kaddish, pray for healing and hear a spiritual message, go to SimShalom.com.

Rabbi Galit Shirah’s Zoom classes will resume this month. Prayerbook and Modern Hebrew classes will continue, and a Talmud class is currently being planned.  For information, contact the rabbi at (562) 715-0888 or duets@icloud.com.

Faith Christian Assembly

Faith Christian Assembly believes it is important for both men and women to have a ministry devoted to each group to help them grow their faith. Both groups will meet this week.  It should also interest you to know that both groups have a devoted time of praying for your needs. The Women’s Ministry, Touch of Love, under the direction of Linda Hernandez will be meeting Thursday, November 19 at 6:30 p.m. in the Garden Room.  The Men’s Ministry under the direction of Gary Leming will also be meeting during this time as well.  Take advantage of these special ministries that are devoted to Men and to Women.

Out of an abundance of  caution, Faith Christian Assembly will take your temperature at the door, and you will be asked to wear a mask, especially before and after service, and sit socially distant from others. If you are ill, we ask that you stay home.  

Grief Share meets on Wednesdays at 2 p.m. 

To receive a free newsletter and more information on the church, call (562) 598-9010 or visit our website at www.FCAchurch.net. 

Community Church

By Johan Dodge

Reverend

Join Community Church for the 24-hour Day of Prayer beginning at noon on Nov. 14-. The theme is “Immersion of Gratitude,” with a focus on Psalm 100:4-5. This is an opportunity to outwardly express and share in our gratefulness to God during this unsettling season. Special cut-out leaves are available at the church office, where people are invited to come in and write out a personal note of thanksgiving that will be placed on a large paper tree. The “tree of thanksgiving” will be on display in front of the church office through  Nov. 15. 

The food drive will also take place on the patio on Nov. 15 in front of the church. Anyone in the Leisure World community is welcome to drop off non-perishable food items.  

The new year has begun; it’s a year of good news!

Community Church is changing things up this year. Last Sunday was the first Sunday of the new Christian year.  And for the season of Extended Advent  (seven weeks instead of four) Community Church is looking at hope amid the season of expectation. 

This week, we are looking at how hope shapes our understanding of risk. There have recently been a lot of talking heads telling us to be afraid of this or to be fearful of that. The hope that Christ teaches us to have, hold and use overcomes the fears of this world.  If you have been living without hope, or you find yourself drifting toward hopelessness in this moment, Community Church would love for this Sunday to be the one that you join us for worship.  

To hear this teaching as well as some worship music, tune in  Sunday morning at 9:50 on Facebook live,  @communitychurchleisureworld.  If you want to join us for virtual fellowship, call the church office or email leisurewccsue@yahoo.com. If you don’t have a computer or Facebook,  call in to our phone system at (562) 431-2503  and listen to the message beginning Sunday evening 

Communion is served the first Sunday of the month at 1 p.m. in front of the church. The elements are pre-sealed for safety, and the liturgy is part of the morning worship on Facebook. Those who come must wear a mask and maintain distancing. The Communion table is an open table; all who want to receive Communion may come and participate. You do not need to be a member of the church.  

As always, if you are in need without another way to address it, you may call the church office to leave a message at (562) 431-2503.

Redeemer Lutheran & St. Theodore’s

By Lisa Rotchford

LW contributor

Veterans Day is an opportunity for all of us to give thanks to God for the veterans in our lives—those who are still with us and others gone before us.  My favorite veteran is my father, who went to Heaven three years ago at the age of 98, and was a proud SeaBee in WWII.  

SeaBees are Navy sailors from the United States Naval Construction Battalions (hence, “CBs”), whose mission was to build the infrastructures necessary for the other divisions of the U.S. armed forces.  Adorning their memorial by the entrance to Arlington National Cemetery are both their official and unofficial mottos. The official one is: “With compassion for others we build—we fight for peace with freedom,” and the unofficial is “With willing hearts and skilled hands, the difficult we do at once.  The impossible takes a bit longer.”    

As we live in a pandemic-enforced time of waiting, it’s important to remember we are all called to help one another and build each other up.  And remember, we are all part of the construction battalion that builds God’s kingdom here on Earth.  Following the SeaBees’ lead, we are to compassionately live with one another in peace. With willing hearts and skilled hands we will get through these difficult times.  We thank God for the skilled scientists, doctors and nurses called to do the impossible. But together, with patience and God’s grace, we will get through these difficult times.  (Tackling the impossible is just 

taking a little longer). Happy Veterans Day to all the veterans, spouses, parents and children of veterans. Let’s keep constructing for God’s purposes.  

The worship services are at  8:45 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. outside, weather  permitting, and the inside service starts at 10:30. To adhere to the CDC guidelines, masks and social distancing  are required, and the service will be under 40 minutes in length. Organist Sharon Heck  will play hymns throughout the gathering time. Bread and wine for Communion are hygienically sealed and distributed for all to take home and share with prayers. Join Redeemer at St. Theodore’s for service  at 135654 Saint Andrews (across from Administration) this Sunday.

First Christian Church

By Bruce Humes

Pastor

The apostle Paul in his letter to the Roman believers wrote: “Now we know that whatever the law says, it says to those who are under the law, that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God” (Romans 3:19, NKJV).

God, in his sovereignty, provided his people the Mosaic law to live by, but we also see in other parts of the Bible “that every mouth (meaning Jew and Gentile) may be stopped (without excuse)” as well as “all the world may become guilty before God.” The Greek meaning for “guilty” in this Scripture is “under sentence, condemned” so we see through the Mosaic law, we all are under sentence, condemned. 

 Paul continues in Romans 3:20 by saying,“Therefore by the deeds of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight, for by the law is the knowledge of sin.” These laws were not given to justify us in the sight of God, but to bring us to an understanding or knowledge of sin. 

Think of it like this, we can look into a mirror to see how dirty our face is, but the mirror can’t clean our face. Or we can use a thermometer to check our temperature, but the thermometer can’t do anything for our fever. In both of these examples, we need something else to wash our face or reduce our fever. Likewise, the law convicts of sin, but is of no value in saving us from sin.

Paul tells us in verses 21-24 the thing that will give what we need: “But now the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed, being witnessed by the Law and the Prophets.” We see that the law did nothing to save us, but in this verse, we see the righteousness of God being revealed through a plan that would do what is needed, and the witnesses were none other than the Law, which through its sacrifices foretold us of the need for blood atonement, and the prophets who prophesied of the coming savior. 

Moving to verse 22-24, Paul writes, “Even the righteousness of God, through faith in Jesus Christ, to all and on all who believe. For there is no difference; for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus”

It’s through our faith, meaning our utter reliance on Jesus as our savior, that frees us from sin. Paul continues with “to all and on all who believe.”  The phrase “to all” means it is offered to, available and sufficient for all. But is only “on those who believe” through their act of faith.

It’s clear from God’s word that we all have fallen short of the mark God has set for us. We can’t be justified by the works of the law, so God in his grace, mercy and righteousness sent a redeemer to pay the full price for our redemption. In writing to the Galatians, Paul put it like this: “Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law, having become a curse for us” (Galatians 3:13 NKJV).

These scriptures can bring comfort to those who believe since Jesus did for us what the law could not do.

If you want to speak to someone at the church or if you have a need, call the church office at (562) 431-8810. Leave a recorded message, and someone will get back to you as quickly as possible.

Holy Family Catholic Church

Holy Family Catholic Church, 13900 Church Place next to the St. Andrews Gate, will observe the 33rd Sunday on Nov. 15. 

The First Reading is from Proverbs 31:10-13, 19-20, 30-31 and the Second Reading is 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6. The Gospel reading will be from Matthew 25:14-30.

This week’s Alleluia is from John 15:4A, 5B, reading: “Remain in me as I remain in you, says the Lord. Whoever remains in me bears much fruit. R. Alleluia, alleluia.”  

Thanksgiving Day Mass

Mass will be at 9 a.m. on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 26. Within the Mass, Holy Family will have the Blessing of the Bread and Wine that can be shared with members’ families at their Thanksgiving meals.  Holy Family invites members to bring a loaf of bread and a bottle of wine to be blessed.

Masses 

If you would like to receive a copy of the weekly parish bulletin, you can sign up at https://ebulletin.jspaluch.com or https://www.jspaluch.com/Subscribe.

The church is now open to public entry and can return its regular Mass schedule. Saturday (Vigil Mass) is at 5 p.m. and Sunday Masses are at 8 a.m., 10 a.m. and noon.

Those who attend must a wear a mask or face shield and sit socially distanced, as well as use hand sanitizer upon entry into the building. 

Parish Office

The parish office is now open.  The office’s hours are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. -3 p.m.  

LW Baptist

By Rolland Coburn

Pastor

One day, I visited a friend experiencing health troubles in a convalescent hospital. I brought him a copy of the Bible promise in Psalm 46:1, “God is our refuge and strength, a proven help in troubles.” I showed these words to his wife, and she turned to her bedridden husband and said, “Listen to this; it is for us.” As she began to read, she choked up and had to make repeated attempts before she could go on. Finally she succeeded in reading the whole psalm.

Martin Luther translated this promise, “a mighty fortress is our God.” Another hymn writer paraphrased, “O God our help in ages past, our hope for years to come/Our shelter from the stormy blast and our eternal home.”

People of faith have found this promise to be true. We find the only safe and secure place is in the Lord. Our Savior put it simply when he said, “Come unto me, all you that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest,” Matthew 11:28. Whoever believes in him will not be disappointed.

Congregation Sholom

Rabbi Karen Isenberg will stream services at 6:30 p.m on Friday, Nov. 13, on Zoom.   Rabbi Isenberg will also be on Zoom for Saturday morning services at 9:30 on Nov. 14. Saturday’s Torah portion will be Chayei Sarah about the life of Sarah.

Any new Congregation Sholom members who want to watch the livestream should contact Jeff Sacks to recieve the Zoom invitation. Text to Jeff at (714) 642-0122 email or him at jfsacks@gmail.com. The link will have the meeting ID and password embedded. Those who want more details or need to practice beforehand can call Jeff ahead of time.

Zoom also provides a phone number to call if you do not have Internet service. The number in California is in San Jose. (Area code 669). To call inside California is toll-free for most, but you may want to check with your phone provider.  

The Zoom link is https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3752519429?pwd=UDREWTA1N21jaXVUZUhyQmY1U01JQT09, the meeting ID is 375 251 9429 and the passcode is 8ZYy69

Those who want to call in to the Zoom meeting need to dial +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose). The meeting ID is 375 251 9429.

 On Thursday,  Nov. 12th Congregation Sholom will have a Zoom challah bake. The cost for supplies is $15. 

Congregation Sholom will host a game afternoon via Zoom this Sunday at 4 p.m. hosted by Sandy Geffner.

This week the group will  play  Scattergories. Jeff  will set up the Zoom session. Those who want to play need to email Jeff at jfsacks@gmail.com ahead  of time so he can send you a Zoom invite link. The game afternoon will bring a lot of fun, mental exercise and laughter to participants. 

When logging on at 4 p.m., Sandy will give the group instructions on the  game rules. Those who are planning on participating should have a pencil and piece of paper ready.

Electric Shabbat Candles  that have graciously been obtained for Leisure World residents by Rachel Berkowitz of Chabad are available for $8. This will enable shareholders to “light” a candle on Friday night and keep it burning until after Havdalah on Saturday night without a risk of fire. Contact Carol Levine to receive a set. 

Those who want to participate in the livestreamed services on the Congregation Sholom of Leisure World Group Facebook page should contact Ron Yaffee at (562) 430-7040.

LWKCC

On Nov. 1, Korean Community Church (LWKCC ) celebrated Sa-Yong “Sam” Chi’s 90th birthday with a socially distanced party and worship in the garden in front Chi’s house. Senior Pastor Yong Jang Young emceed the event, Elder Kim Hee Yun gave prayer and Pastor Kang In Duk gave blessing.

Sam is a resident of Mutual 14 and a member of Leisure World Korean Community Church. 

He was born in South Korea in 1930, immigrated to the U.S. in 1974, and moved into Leisure World in 2003. He has one daughter, three sons, seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

He served in the South Korean army during the Korean War. During that time, he assisted the U.S. army in South Korea as a civilian for 17 years. His service was recognized and was sponsored for immigration to the U.S.

After immigrating, he invited immigrant families into his home and helped them assimilate and find jobs and apartments.

Sam served as president of Choong Dong High School Alumni in 1978. He established scholarships for students and teachers. Every year, CDHS Alumni gives scholarships to students and provided one month of all-expense-paid tours to the west and east coasts of the U.S. and Hawaii to three “Teachers of the Year” from South Korea. These scholarships have encouraged teachers to educate students with sincere hearts and their schools have achieved high evaluations.

Sam served two terms as president of the Korean American Senior Association of Orange County and served as an advisor for more than two decades. During his terms in KASA of OC, he recruited many sponsors and new members. As a direct result of some of his fundraising efforts, two buses were given to the association by a sponsor for senior transportation.

The White House awarded Sam the President’s Volunteer Service award in 2013 and a lifetime achievement award in 2016. He continues to live a passionate life of service for his community, family and friends. He is compassionate, kind, energetic, enjoys gardening, building good friendships, and loves to travel.

LWKCC has online worship every Sunday at 10 a.m. via YouTube.

Community, page 16

Marvelous Mask Makers

These LW Star volunteers, Cassie Caddell (top left) Verna Morgan (upper right) and Dorothy Swartz – are hard- working mask makers

When Caddell, Schwartz and Morgan, heard about the high need for washable face masks at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, they individually went to work for the Sewing Brigade’s Mask project. All three of them were highly productive, Schwartz has sewn over 2,400 masks, Caddell 2,000, and  Morgan put hundreds of kits together. They have put in so much time and effort to help keep LW’ers safe.

Sunshine Club

Maryann Shaddow will be at this week’s Zoom presentation

Maryann Shaddow, a Realtor from On Site Home Sales, is the speaker for the Sunshine Club’s Zoom meeting on Friday, Nov. 13, at 10 a.m.

To join the Zoom meeting, follow the link, https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82119904568?pwd=dkVmOVowRU1uQXRNb2QveFdFSHp4Zz09. The meeting ID is t821 1990 4568. 

Those who would like to get a Zoom link by email, text  your email address to (562) 301-5339 by no later than Thursday at 5 p.m.

Shaddow will give  tips on how to best market units. She will cover the benefit of staging a  unit, how to arrive at the right price for your unit, as well as going through the process of selling a unit in Leisure World.

During the meeting Shaddow will also go over everything that shareholders need to know about moving out of Leisure World if they choose to do so in the future. 

The second half of the meeting will be about what the mutuals require from buyers. Shaddow will explain why some mutuals are easier to qualify for than others. 

Shaddow has been a Realtor in Leisure World for four-and-a-half years. She worked with Leisure Living for two-and-a-half years and then moved to On Site, where she has worked for the past two years.   

Shaddow  is originally from New Jersey. She started her career in real estate while she was working as a teacher and raising four kids who kept her busy.  Since she and her husband were both teachers, they needed to supplement their income to keep up with their kids going to college, and she has been working in real estate ever since.

COVID-19 has been a challenge for real estate, and Shaddow will discuss how On Site is marketing properties for sale while still keeping the community safe. On Site and Shaddow’s No. 1 goal is to ensure that residents are kept safe, especially sellers who are still living in the property they are trying to sell. They have implemented virtual tours for buyers, which reduces the amount of foot traffic in the community, until a buyer is prequalified and ready to purchase. Buyers can view the homes for sale on the website www.leisureworldhomesales. This helps to keep the amount of homes they see down to a minimum. 

All shareholders are welcome to join this Zoom meeting.

The Sunshine Club often has LW leaders come to meetings to introduce their organizations to the group. It also invites a wide variety of specialists from outside to share their experiences and ideas with club members. The club always welcomes new people.

The topic of each guest speaker’s presentation will be announced  in the LW Weekly with link information to join.

For more information, contact Anna Derby at (562) 301-5339.

LW birthday

Pretty in pink: Marion Carvell from Mutual 1 celebrated her 96 birthday on November 8. Her cousins and niece from Northern California are flying in to spend a few days celebrating with her. Carvell has been a Leisure World resident for the past 20 years.

Chess Club

This week’s puzzle is white moves first, and for any answer by black, the white’s next move is checkmate. 

The white bishop moves from F4 to G3.  Any answer by black, the white’s next move is checkmate.

The Chess Club is unable to play together because of  the COVID-19 shutdowns. The chess puzzle will appear in the LW paper weekly.

Solution to this week’s puzzle is first move Qg8

Paws, claws and beaks

Donation to be made to pet rescue

Paws, Claws and Beaks would like to thank all of the vendors who donated their cancelled flea market table fees. The club donated the funds to the Shamrock Pet Rescue Foundation and the Helen Sanders Cat Paws. 

 According to Helen Sanders Cat Paws, 370 kittens were adopted and 23 adults have been adopted during the coronavirus. Some families even brought the kittens  into nursing homes to comfort their loved ones. 

The funds were divided between evenly between the cat and dog foundations. 

Everyone that signed up for the last flea market will be notified when and if the club is able to accommodate any future flea market. 

Low-Cost Vet Clinic is next week

Community Church is hosting a low-cost Vet Care Clinic on Thursday, Nov. 19,  from 9-11 a.m.  This is a clinic for both cats and dogs. Bring dogs leashed and put cats in crates for their safety. Licensing applications are available for 30 pets. Contact Elaine Miller with questions and concerns at (925) 997-3412.

Republican Club

By Brian Harmon

LW contributor

As of this writing, Vice President Joe Biden has 264 electoral votes, with four states still too close to call. He needs 270 to win.

The closeness of this presidential election has led to concerns about the possibility that the winner of the popular vote may not be the one who becomes president because of the Electoral College.

Although some people would prefer to have a pure democracy where the majority always gets their way, that is not the way this country is supposed to run. America is not a pure democracy, but rather a democratic republic.

Since the way the Electoral College works is spelled out in the constitution, it would be very difficult to change. There are actually four ways to amend the constitution: two have never been used and the third has only been used once. 

The primary way of amending the constitution requires a two-thirds vote in both houses of Congress, plus approval by three-fourths of the states.

The Electoral College gives each state one vote for each senator and one for each house member representing that state. That way, a large state has a much bigger say than a small state, but not so much that a candidate can be elected without having some support from small states also.

Another defense of the Electoral College is that each state has its own election laws. Hypothetically, a very large state, where a single party held effectively all the power,  could swing the election. Being lax with its election laws and enforcement could make it easier to collect large majorities within certain parties. 

A similar thing actually occurred in 1888. Democrat Grover Cleveland won a plurality of the popular vote because he won the southern states by large margins that were over 30 percent, but because of the Electoral College, the presidency went to Benjamin Harrison from Ohio.

Another “undemocratic” feature of the U.S. government is that although the House of Representatives is based on population, the Senate is composed of two Senators from each state, regardless of the population. This was the result of a compromise between the large states and the small states. Without this compromise, the Constitution would, undoubtedly, not have been approved. 

••••

In local races, the only clear-cut winner at this point is City Councilman and former Mayor Thomas Moore, who thanked the Republican Club for its support. Janet Nguyen appears at the moment to have a healthy lead in her Assembly race, but past experience shows that this is not a guarantee of victory. Orange County Supervisor Michelle Steel is, at this time, neck-and-neck with Congressman Harley Rouda.

How to protect yourself from 

different Social Security scams

While Social Security fraud and scams have been around long before anyone had ever heard of the coronavirus, scammers are exploiting the fear and uncertainty of the virus to take advantage of those on Social Security.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has identified three scams that have gained popularity due to the coronavirus to avoid.

1. A fraudulent letter threatening suspension of benefits: With many local Social Security offices closed due to the ongoing pandemic, many seniors are worried they won’t get their benefits. Criminals prey upon this fear with a relatively new scam targeting Social Security recipients with a letter telling them that their benefits will be suspended or permanently discontinued unless they call a phone number provided in the letter.

When unsuspecting seniors call, a scammer tries to obtain their personal information or convince them to pay money– through retail gift cards, cash or wire transfers–in order to keep their benefits.

It’s important to know that while a local Social Security office may be closed, that won’t stop seniors from getting their checks. “Any communication you receive that says Social Security will do so is a scam, whether you receive it by letter, text, email or phone call,” according to the SSA’s website.

Social Security will not threaten seniors with suspended benefits, arrest or legal action unless they pay money. It also won’t promise higher benefits in exchange for payment.

2. Calls asking for a Social Security number to activate Medicare: Scammers will call seniors and claim that they need their Social Security number and other personal information such as date of birth in order to activate or replace a Medicare card. They may take a Medicare number as well, because of the potential to deceive the system. Some thieves will offer to “upgrade” a victim’s paper benefits card to plastic, which doesn’t exist, for a fee and simultaneously steal (their) credit card information.

3. Fake text messages about a SS problem: Some people will send text messages that appear to come from the Social Security Administration. The fake texts try to scare the recipient by saying there’s a problem with their Social Security number and asking them to call a scam number  to pay a fee in order to avoid further legal problems.

It’s important in these situations that Social Security will never contact you via text and ask you to call an unknown number. The program will only contact you in limited situations, such as when you’ve signed up for text messaging and when you try to access your account online as a way to verify your identity.

KAMCA

Group donates $1,200 to support the Somang Society in Orange County

By Grace Kim

LW contributor 

The Korean American Classical Music Academy was founded in 2012 out of a desire for people to be able to appreciate and talk about classical music with other people who shared the same interests.  The group most enjoys listening to beautiful symphony and opera tracks while  learning about the composers and their great works.

Before COVID-19, more than 80 members would meet at least three days each month. The members soon felt like family to one another as they bonded while listening to classical music.

KACMA is fortunate to have two volunteer instructors, Dr. Robert Chung and Ken Chong. They love music and always bring  high-level  knowledge and teaching for each meeting. They spend so much time to prepare for this class.

Every year Chong puts together a collection of all the lessons that he provided for KAMCA to give to each member to enjoy for free.

The most current book, which included the meetings from January 2019–March 2020 was filled with comprehensive, beautiful and wonderful resources for all of the members to enjoy for further reading. Both Chong and Chung put a lot of energy and time into it, but unfortunately could not pass it out during a group meeting. 

The class officers asked for donations when members came to pick up the booklet during the COVID-19 pandemic. The money will be donated to support a non-profit organization. Many class members donated when they picked up their book. 

Once the money was collected, officers visited the Somang Society office and donated $1,200. The organization has done visionary and pioneering work for the Korean-American community in California over the last 12 years. Its main office is located in Cypress, California.

The Somang Society provides educational programs such as well-being, well-aging, well-dying, preparing wills, simple funeral service, an Alzheimer’s caregiver support group and grief support groups.

KACMA is very grateful to have been able to make one small contribution to the work of Somang Society during this unprecedented global crisis.

Veterans Day

Veterans Day is a well-known American holiday, but there are also a few misconceptions about it. Here are two important facts you should know, according to the U.S. Department of Defense:

• Veterans Day does not have an apostrophe.

A lot of people think it’s “Veteran’s Day” or “Veterans’ Day,” but they’re wrong. The holiday is not a day that “belongs” to one veteran or multiple veterans, which is what an apostrophe implies. It’s a day for honoring all veterans — so no apostrophe needed.

• Veterans Day is not the Same as Memorial Day. 

A lot of Americans get this confused. Memorial Day is a time to remember those who gave their lives for our country, particularly in battle or from wounds they suffered in battle. Veterans Day honors all of those who have served the country in war or peace — dead or alive — although it’s largely intended to thank living veterans for their sacrifices.

SBTV

SBTV-3 airs on TWC-Spectrum Channel 3, Frontier Fios Channel 37 and online streaming at sbtv3.org/schedule. The playback schedule is available at SBTV3.org.

Thursday, Nov. 12

4 pm North SB Community Center

4:15 pm LW 50th Anniversary 2010

5:01 pm Mariachi San Jose Real

6 pm Ocean Perspectives

7 pm Los Al Jazz Band 2018

7:35 pm   Flamingo Party

8:15 pm The Cowboy Silent Movie

8:23 pm Road Trip Rocky Mountains

8:30 pm Terry Otte/Abilene 

Halloween Scarefest

10 pm Aquarium-Decent into the Depths

10:14 pm Aquarium Wonderful World

of Penguins

10:30 pm Cerritos Center

-Matt Mauser

Friday, Nov. 13

4 pm Road trip Rocky Mountain

4:08 pm Albuquerque Hot Air

Balloon Show

4:31 pm Flamingo Party

5:15 pm 2010 North SB Community Center

5:30 pm Mariachi San Jose Real

6:30 pm Los Al Jazz Band 2018

7:05 pm LW Pickelball/Rocky Mountains

7:20 pm The Cowboy Silent Movie

7:30 pm Life and Times in SB-

Paula Thomas

8:30 pm Harmonn Islanders

9 pm Cerritos Center-

Golden Dragon Acrobats

10:30 pm Cerritos Center-

The Four Tenors

Saturday, Nov. 14

4 pm Healthy Brain Aging

4:40 pm Free Kosher Food

5 pm Judge Carolyn John and Richard

6 pm Terry Otte/Abilene

Halloween Scarefest

7:30 pm Cowboy Silent Movie/ Rocky Mountains

7:45 pm North SB Community Center

8 pm LAUSD

11 pm Cerritos Center–

Matt Mauser

Sunday, Nov. 15

4 pm Seal Beach City Council

Meeting Replay 10/26

5:30 pm Bob Cole Conservancy

6:30 pm Aquarium-Decent to Depths

6:45 pm Wonderful World Penguins

7 pm Life and Times in SB:

Paula Thomas

8 pm Rocky Mountains

8:08 pm Anna Derby’s 71st Birthday

9 pm Abilene Band

10 pm LW 50th Anniversary 2012

10:30 pm Cabaret-Music around the world

11 pm Bob Cole Conservancy

Monday, Nov. 16

4 pm Cabaret-Music around the world

5:30 pm Mariachi San Jose Real

6:30 pm Aquarium- Decent into the  Depths

6:45 pm Aquarium- Wonderful World

of Penguins

7 pm SB City Council Meeting– LIVE

8:30 pm Los Al Jazz Band 2018 V3

9:15 pm  Tina and Tommy

10 pm Cypress Senior Chorus 2018

Tuesday, Nov. 17

4 pm Tina and Tommy

4:45 pm Flamingo Party

5:30 pm Suede Soul Dancers

6:05 pm Rocky Mountains

6:15 pm LW 50th Anniversary 2012

7 pm Alaska Final Frontier/ Radio Club

7:15 pm Los Al Jazz Band 2018

7:50 pm Abilene Band Nov. 2018

8:30 pm Life and Times in SB:

Paula Thomas

9:30 pm Cerritos Center–

Matt Mauser

11:30 pm  Bob Cole Conservancy

Wednesday, Nov. 11

4 pm Tina and Tommy Oct. 2019

4:45 pm LW 50th Anniversary 2012

5:30 pm History of Las Vegas Part 1

6:45 pm History of Las Vegas Part 2

8 pm Life and Times in SB:

Paula Thomas

9 pm Cerritos Center:

Golden Dragon Acrobatics

10:30 pm Cerritos Center-

The Four Tenors

11:30 pm Bob Cole Conservancy

*All programming is subject to change.

Obituaries

••••

Thomas Lennon  72

Tara Luafalemana  47

Timothy Hope  61

Jon Beckom  81

Michael Polizzi  72

Vincent McCormick  69

Michael Nation  63

Jasmine Leyva  27

Warren Taylor Jr.  78

Felipe de Jesus Reveles Cabral  52

Charles  Pomeroy  85

Katherine Solis  92

Alan Kaplan  83

Guy Stroup  67

Families assisted by 

McKenzie Mortuary, 

961-9301

—paid obituary

GENERAL

AVON

Lenora Browning, LW Resident. Phone 562-493-5457. Seal Beach Business License #BRN000. 12/31/20

———————————————————————–

JAFRA

By Helen

LW Resident. (562) 419-3557

www.jafra.com/hwells

Cosmetics, fragrances.

Shop for holiday now.

Business License #WEL0015. 12/17

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SHAKLEE

Delivered to your door. 

LW daughter 

Sandy Vander Woudefikse.

(562) 618-8731. 12/10

———————————————————————-

CBD Joint Relief Body Cream

By Restoor Skin Essentials.

Gina, LW Resident.562-281-7103. Business License #MCQ0015. 12/31

———————————————————————–

Travel Partner Wanted: Recently retired commercial pilot seeks travel partner. Call 562-572-0830. 12/03

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Cat needs a home.

Earnie is a 14 yr. old flame point Siamese cat. His beloved owner passed away and he needs a new friend to love. Earnie loves people, but not other pets, he needs to be a single pet. Please contact Lisa at the corrected email below:

visualfinn@sbcglobal.net 

for photos & more information.

——————————————

Lost orange & white cat in Mutual 15, around St. John & Del Monte. The name of the cat is Whiskey. Please call Jen at 562-431-3717. 11/12

GARDENING

FRANK’S GARDENING SERVICE 

Complete maintenance and landscape. Serving Leisure World since 1978. Planting, clean-ups, fertilization. New lawns, etc. Offering my services to all Mutual’s. Honest and reliable. State Contractor’s License #779462. Call 562-863-7739, 562-743-3832 or 714-527-1172.

HANDYMAN

SERVICES

Additions & Remodeling, Kitchen & Bath Remodeling, Windows, Tile & Stonework. State Contractor’s License #393071. 

OGAN CONSTRUCTION, INC. 

(562) 596-7757. 03/31/22

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JR HOME REPAIRS.  Quality work. Perfectionist, honest & reliable. Call JR 562-519-2764. SB Business License #JRH0001. 07/08/2021

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MP  CONSTRUCTION

General Contractor

Specializing  in  remodeling, Additions, Reconstruction, Window replacement and more! Call for a free estimate. 

562-746-5400. 

License #954725. 04/22/21

BATHTUB & SHOWER REFINISHING

We refinish your TUB/SHOWER to look brand new.

Convert to a WALK-IN SHOWER and/or raise seat.

Nu Kote 562-833-3911  

License #699080 

Serving LW since 1999. 12/10

PAINTING

Painting – Free estimates. 1 room or entire house & refinish kitchen cabinets. Call Jerry (714) 826-8636.

CA State License #675336. 10/29

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Affordable – Professional, 

Licensed and Insured. 

Interior – exterior drywall repair, texturing, pressure washing, 

cabinets. Senior discounts. 

Cory Gee Painting 714-308-9931. 

License #1049257. 01/07/21

FLOOR COVERINGS

310-261-0571

Interior Flooring Solutions

Hardwood floors, carpet, 

laminate, vinyl planks. 

25 years experience. 

Contractor License 1043763. 12/24

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY 

CLEANING & REPAIR

All Year Carpet Cleaning since 1988.

Call Tito (562) 658 – 9841.

State Contractors Lic. #578194.01/21

SKYLIGHT SERVICES

SKYLIGHTS

CLEAN, REPAIR, REPLACE.

Licensed and insured.

Dan (562) 841-3787.

Seal Beach License #BRA0002. 12/17

WINDOW WASHING

WANT CLEAN WINDOWS?

I Clean Inside & Outside Or…

Clean Outside Only and Save $$$.

(562) 600-0014. LW Resident,

Rich Livitsky. Seal Beach 

Business License #LIV0004. 12/03

Leisure World 

Helping Leisure World

Y’s Service Club of the YMCA will assist residents with small non-professional jobs. We change light bulbs, clean air conditioner filters, hang a small picture or mirror, remove or place items on a high shelf, air bicycle tires, etc. Donations gladly accepted. Call weekdays between 9 am-5 pm, (562) 596-9906.

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“ROLLIN THUNDER”

GOLF CART CLUB 

Offers FREE advice on buying and selling of your golf cart. 

562-431-6859.

HOME CARE

PERSONAL ASSISTANT

Maria’s experienced caregivers, run errands, Dr’s appointments, cleaning, cooking, part-time, full-time, live-in. (562) 230-4648. Seal Beach Business License #CAM0006. 12/31/20

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I am an experienced caregiver available to assist with daily care, doctor’s appointments, and errands. Available 24/7. 949-899-7770. 12/31

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CHRISTIAN HOME CARE

Referral Agency. Experienced, knowledgeable caregivers, honest, assertive, fluent English. Hourly/full-time, doctor’s appointments, errands. Bernadine 562-310-0280. Seal Beach Business License #BCS0002. Bonded/insured. 12/10/20

MOST AFFORDABLE RATE affordable rates with optimum service, 23 years experience LW, reliable, honest caregivers. Licensed, 24 hour, part time, doctors, appointments, references, fluent English. Ann 714-624-1911, Heidi 562-277-3650. Seal Beach License #HYC0001. 12/31/20

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EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER

Over 20 years in Leisure World with Excellent References.  Hourly or Live-in. Please Call Pampet: 562-371-4895. Seal Beach License PAN0003 12/31

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Do you need help getting things done? Call “your personal concierge.” Home organization, running errands, house/pet sitting, personal shopper, post ofice services and more! Reasonable rates. 

Call or text Lisa (949) 432-1877. 11/26

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Experienced caregiver, CNA, medication management, dementia, diabetic care, doctor appointments, errands, companionship, cooking & cleaning. Overnight care available. (714) 719-4951. 11/19

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Elderly care. Live-in, live-out. 30 years of experience. Cooking, cleaning, medications, companions, doctors. Experience with dementia. Liensed by the state. 

Gloria 949-371-7425. 01/14/21

BEAUTY SERVICES

Tammy Nguyen Phenix Salon – Service in private suite. One customer, one hairstylist. Sanitized & professional. Haircut for men & women, shampoo, set, color, highlights, perm, nails & toenails. In-house service available. Tammy Nguyen. 13944 Seal Beach Blvd,  #116. (714) 425-4198. 11/26

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In home hair care, serving the men and women of Leisure World for 36 years. Mel, cell: 562-480-9341. License #KC75538. 12/03

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Stylish haircut at home. Countless clients w/referrals.  

Gabriel 562-708-3170. License #B50551. 12/24

HOUSE CLEANING

MOVE-IN, MOVE-OUT

WINDOWS,

HOUSECLEANING

CALL PHIL AT

562-881-2093

Over 30 years Experience!

Seal Beach Business

License #AB0001. 12/10

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Experienced housekeeper. I do weekly and monthly cleaning. 

Call 949-899-7770. 12/31

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Patricia House Cleaning, weekly or monthly. Excellent referrals in Leisure World. 562-397-4659 Seal

Beach License LUC0001.12/31

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GRACIAN’S HOUSECLEANING & WINDOWS.

Windows 10% off first cleaning

General housecleaning

Excellent referrals in LW

(562) 307-3861. 

20 years experience.

Seal Beach Business License gra0006. 12/17

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MAGALY’S CLEANING SERVICE

We make your home sparkle! 7 days-call anytime! Complete cleaning. Seal Beach Business License #M0001A. Call 562-505-1613. 01/28

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General housekeeping, 30 years of experience. Bi-weekly or monthly. Seal Beach License RAZ0002. Call Gloria 949-371-7425. 01/14/21

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Maria House Cleaning

We’ll make your house look as

nice as possible! 15 years of

experience, We can work with your

schedule. Bi-weekly or monthly.

Deep cleaning.

Call or text 714-496-2885.

Bus. Lic #HER0008. 01/21

House cleaning/Eco-Friendly products. I’ve been working in Leisure World since 2004 and can provide references. 

Lori 949-275-8165. Seal Beach Business License SAG0003. 11/12

COMPUTERS

FRUSTRATED 

(562)755-6199

Everything for your computer (PC or Mac), cell phone, TV, stereo, any electronic device. 

Tina Schaffer. Seal Beach Bus.   

   License #CIP0001 11/12

John’s Computer Services

562-733-9193

Virus removal, Repair, Training,

Software, Wireless, Internet

Security. LW Resident

 SB License FUH0001. 01/21/21

AUTOS WANTED

ANY KIND OF CAR

Cars, motorcycle, truck – running or not. We are local – call anytime! We pay cash and remove promptly!We do DMV and Release of liability for you! Bonded/Licensed, since 1985! Call us so we can come out and give you a quote. 562-684-0901. 01/14/21

Electric CarTs/ Scooters/Mobile Chairs for sale

Golf Cars BUY SELL TRADE and REPAIRS. Call: 714-292-9124. 05/13/21

TRANSPORTATION

Need a lift? Pam Miller. 

LW Resident. 310-227-1258. 11/19

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Rides by Russ

For over 5 years I have been 

giving all types of rides to 

Leisure World residents. 

Airports, doctors, shopping and errands. 714-655-1544. 11/19

Autos/Boats/RV’s

Trailers FOR SALE

ELECTRIC CAR PADS

Installed at your residence. Call Frank 562-743-3832. State Contractor’s License #779462.

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2010 White EZ-Go rear cargo bed. New batteries, tires, wheels. Extras! 562-446-0293. 11/12

MOVING, HAULING & 

STORAGE SERVICES

J&D HAUL AWAY AND CLEAN-UP SERVICE

No job too small, fast, reliable, great prices. Seal Beach Business License

BRA0002. Dan: 562-841-3787 12/17

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A FRIEND AND A TRUCK

Your moving service, any size job. Call 310-387-2618. Business License RO263644. 12/17

MISCELLANEOUS  FOR SALE

Extra large medical bed, air mattress, quicky wheelchair, hoyer lift, cough machine. 562-341-8470. 11/12

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Bicycles men’s Schwinn 21 speed, folding bike. $50 each OBO. 

503-314-3873. 11/12

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Miscellaneous items for sale. All items are in perfect condition. All day Thursday; all other days afternoon only. For appointment call 818-486-2992. 11/12

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Items for sale: 8-piece place setting, Haviland China, rose pattern, 70 pieces, perfect, $350 OBO. Glass top coffee table $50. King size wicker headboard, off-white $25. Bissel carpet shampooer $10. 

562-896-6500. 11/12

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Private estate sale – Mutual 10. Furniture: bedroom set, couch/loveseat, coffee/end tables, dining room table/chairs, China hutch, electric fireplace, desk, lamps. Also kitchen items, set of China, Christmas collectibles. Call for an appointment. Mary Lou 562-496-3652. 11/12

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Estate Sales

Estate Sale by appointment. Thursday Nov. 12 and Friday, Nov. 13 from 9am – 2pm. 13265 Del Monte Dr., Mutual 12 – Apt 35J. Everything Ethan Allen – dining table, hutch, desk, chairs, dressers. Kitchen bistro set, baker’s rack, full size bed, lamps. Waterford glasses, Dansk dishes, silverplated tea set, wicker tea cart. Ladies clothing (Small), costume jewelry. Vacuum, stere, walker. Mask and distancing required. Call for appointment Estate Sales by Dacia Drake 714-514-8232. Seal Beach Business License ESD0001

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PRIVATE SALE

Nov 12, 13, from 9 – noon. Sofas, sleeper bed, coffee table, area rugs,  wood dining table, TV, coffee table, twin beds, jewelry case, safe,  office cabinet, lamps, china cabinets Mask must be worn, 1190 Northwood, 165J Mutual 7. GLINDA DAVIS. 

FREE ITEMS

FREE Vizio TV in excellent condition looking for a new home. Dimensions 25″w x 16″ high. No remote control. Call 408-891-8700. 11/12

CARPORTS WANTED

Wanted carport for rent to park a Sea-Doo. 425-647-1220. 

grossrick@msn.com. 12/03

CEMETERY PLOTS FOR SALE

4 cemetery plots together. Rose Hills Whittier. Garden of Affection. $11,000 OBO. 626-484-5575. Text me. 11/12