LWW Trans/Vie Ed. 4-16-20

April 16, 2020

Message from the GRF President

by Linda Stone

GRF President

Let me begin by saying how very proud I am of our community and the generosity of residents to help one another. I want to personally thank every resident of our Leisure World community for stepping up during this unprecedented challenge. 

We are living in a time that is uncharted—none of us has experienced such a global phenomenon. But as true Americans, we have risen to the challenge. This is never more evident than in Leisure World.

Our community has “circled the wagons” and met the day-to-day actions required in these uncertain times to keep our families, friends and neighbors safe.

We are now heading into another week where our daily lives will again be temporarily altered. Please continue to do what’s right as a community, for our community. Stay home. Social distance. Check in on our neighbours. Continue to take the guidelines seriously even if it seems to drag on. Find new ways to lift your spirits. A new hobby, a craft project, a social distance walk, read the book that has sat on your shelf or simply cherish the time to relax a bit from our normal busy schedules. We will get through this, and we will persevere. We are an Extraordinary Community. 

I want to add special thanks to the fabulous staff led by Executive Director Randy Ankeny. The GRF employees are the best! To a person they go above and beyond: they are dedicated; professional; hardworking; always helpful, amenable and cheerful. 

On behalf of the GRF Board of Directors, I want to thank you, the residents, for your continued dedication to Leisure World and for your support for the wide-ranging changes we have had to make in response to the immediate challenges of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Please do your best to keep yourselves and those around you safe and healthy as this continues to impact every facet of our lives and our community.

3 payment boxes vandalized

On April 13, GRF staff found three white payment boxes had been broken into, and the contents of the boxes were taken. The locations of these boxes are at Clubhouse 1, Oakmont and El Dorado, and Merion and Thunderbird. 

The last pickups for these locations were on Friday at 8:30 a.m. for Clubhouse 1 and at 10:30 a.m. for the other two locations. 

If you dropped a payment in any of these three boxes after the last pickup time on Friday, Accounting strongly suggests you place a stop payment on your check, reissue the check and monitor your bank account closely for possible fraudulent activity. 

To prevent additional payment theft, all payment boxes have been removed and will no longer be available. 

You may still deposit acceptable payments in the payment slot located on the outside of the Administration building at the Accounting department or mail your payment directly to the respective payment processing center. 

Mutual assessment payments can be addressed to the name of your Mutual, PO Box 60017, City of Industry, CA 91716-0041. 

Direct debit is the safest way to protect your banking information and ensures payments are received in a timely manner, according to the Accounting department.

To sign up for direct debit for your monthly assessment, complete an ACH Direct Debit Authorization form before April 25, then place the form in the payment slot located on the outside of the Administration building. 

The form can be downloaded from the website www.lwsb.com, GRF tab, then documents. You may also call the Accounting department at (562) 431-6586, ext. 330. Contact your utility company to sign up for direct debit for those payments. Most utility companies do not charge for this service.

If you saw any suspicious activity that may related to this theft, contact the Security Office.

Financial Statements are inserted in paper

The 2019 audited financial statements for the Golden Rain Foundation and for your respective  LW Mutual are inserted in this week’s edition of the LW Weekly.

Homebound LWers can sign up for free food program

On April 7, the Seal Beach Recreation Department Meals on Wheels team delivered about 100 free meals to Seal Beach senior citizens. 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Seal Beach Meals on Wheels program has become the lifeline to many seniors by being the sole source of free meals delivery in Seal Beach. 

For homebound individuals 60-plus years of age who are unable to shop and/or prepare meals for themselves, the City of Seal Beach delivers three meals directly to their home. 

The delivery includes breakfast items, a cold lunch and a frozen dinner.

These meals, which provide 100 percent of the U.S Nutritional Recommended Dietary Allowance, are available five days per week at no cost to the community.

“This program is a testament to the incredible commitment of our staff team which provide the highest level of essential and vital services to our community in need during a major crisis,” said Seal Beach City Manager Jill Ingram.

For more information about this program, contact Seal Beach Recreation Manager Tim Kelsey at (562) 431-2527, ext. 1341, or tkelsey@sealbeachca.gov. 

For updated information on the City’s response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, visit the City of Seal Beach website at www.sealbeachca.gov.

Walking trail maps available

Regular brisk walking can help people maintain a healthy weight, prevent or manage various conditions, including heart disease, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes; strengthen bones and muscles; and improve mood, and balance and coordination.

The Safe at Home order has suspended all club activity and closed LW amentities, but people can still go walking.

To that end, the Recreation Department has a Leisure World Walking Trails brochure featuring seven measured trails throughout the community. Stop by the Downtown Café and pick one up or check out page 12 for trails reprints like the one at right. For more information, contact kathyt@lwsb.com.

With a Little Help from My Friends

Kindness of Neighbors

Lisa Dickson of Mutual 1 found a big plastic bag loaded with paper towels and toilet paper on her front porch a few days ago. It turned out it was from her next door neighbor Noemi Gonzalez. She texted Noemi to thank her, and Noemi then thanked Lisa for the goodies wrapped in colorful paper she left for Noemi. These reciprocal acts of kindness are especially meaningful as the COVID-19 pandemic crisis persists. “We are just next door, but we keep on texting each other to keep in touch because saying hello lifts my spirits and helps me to cope in these days of isolation,” said Lisa. 

Never Mix Bleach with Ammonia

Frances Vargas of Mutual 2 called the LW Weekly April 9 to report that people should never mix bleach with ammonia. The former RN was prompted to call after reading a story on page 3 of the Weekly. An editing error accidentally spliced together two sentences and omitted the word “NEVER.” As Frances used to teach her Girl Scouts, mixing bleach and ammonia causes fumes that can irritate the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Editor Ruth Osborn apologizes for making the mistake and thanks the scores of LWers who were quick to call in so she could rectify the error as soon as possible. 

Sewing Brigade Update

Dean Jacobus, who is overseeing a grassroots effort in LW to make cloth masks for first responders (they use them to protect their M95 and surgical masks), reports that 2,200 masks have been shipped and 5,000 yards of elastic has been delivered for the next load. The group is awaiting the delivery of $2,400 worth of cotton fabric. Masks are headed out to several hospitals and other front-line medical workers.

Special Delivery

An angel recently left 45 bottles of water on Penny Squibb’s Mutual 5 patio. Penny said she doesn’t know who her angel is but she is very grateful for the water and for the unexpected kindness in the middle of this emergency.

Mask Makers Wanted 

Diana Harrison of Mutual 5 wants to assemble a team of people to make masks for Leisure World residents who do not have access to them. She is looking for volunteers to cut elastic, sew masks and/or assemble no-sew masks. 

She also needs people to wash fabric as material must be washed before it is sewn into masks. She will supply the materials. If you can help, call (714) 497-6642 or email dianaharrison714@gmail.com.

Rain heightens mosquito breeding potential

With the recent rain, Orange County Vector Control District experts stress the need for residents to take an active role in mosquito control by checking their property for standing water. Even a bottle cap full of water can breed mosquitoes.

There is no evidence to date to suggest that COVID-19 can be transmitted by mosquitoes. The COVID-19 respiratory virus spreads mainly through droplets generated when an infected person coughs or sneezes. But mosquitoes do transmit West Nile Virus, which is spread by the bite of an infected bug.

Standing water should be emptied. Containers should be sealed tightly to prevent mosquito entry, and unnecessary containers should be removed from yards. It only takes 5-7 days for mosquitoes to go from egg to biting adult.

Residents should take the following precautions to help reduce the chances of breeding mosquitoes:

• Dump and drain any containers filled with water at least once a week.

• Clean and scrub bird baths and pet water bowls weekly

• Dump water from potted plant saucers.

• Do not transport or share plant clippings rooted in water.

• Drill a hole or puncture containers to eliminate standing water.

In accordance with CDC and local public health recommendations, the Orange County Vector Control District is committed to helping slow the spread of COVID-19, by implementing social distancing measures and limiting contact with others. 

Based on these recommendations, the OCMVCD District office is closed and all non-essential staff are working remotely. 

Although District offices are closed,  essential services such as mosquito surveillance, inspections and control of large, chronic mosquito breeding sources are being conducted. 

The District has suspended all requests for service from the public. 

 In case of an emergency, contact a District representative at ocvcd@ocvector.org. 

Staff will monitor this line during business hours. 

If you do not have access to email, call (714) 876-3887. Staff will check the voicemail and will return calls.

COVID-19 Updates

The outbreak of COVID-19 respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus was was first detected in China late last year. Updated information from the CDC and other authorities, in addition to the latest guidance and reminders of how residents can protect themselves, will be provided in this weekly column. What’s known about COVID-19  is rapidly changing as scientists learn more.

What Is It?

 The World Health Organization describes the novel coronavirus as a member of “a large family of viruses” that cause everything from the common cold to  Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). COVID-19 is the disease caused by the coronavirus. State officials expect weeks more of social distancing policies and warn that lifting the strict rules too early could worsen the health crisis. There are no known cases of COVID-19 in Leisure World; Seal Beach has five reported cases as of presstime, according to the Orange County Health Care Agency.

Disease could become seasonal

The public should realize that coronavirus cases are likely to rise when stay-at-home orders are eased, officials said. It’s unlikely the new coronavirus will be completely eradicated, and the disease could become seasonal, according to Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. That would make it unlike a different coronavirus scare of the past, the virus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003, which killed 774 people worldwide and was fully contained within months.

California is taking action to fight virus

California is working around the clock to respond to COVID-19. Actions include:

• Directing Californians to stay at home to slow the spread of the virus

• Making testing free for most Californians who are medically eligible for testing

• Deploying the California National Guard to work at food banks

• Distributing millions of N95 masks and other protective gear to health care workers, with more to come soon

• Securing travel trailers and hotels to house people experiencing homelessness.

For more on the latest California state actions, visit covid19.ca.gov.

California Testing for COVID-19

Twenty-two public health labs in California are testing samples for COVID-19. These labs are located at the California Department of Public Health’s Laboratory in Long Beach, Los Angeles,  Orange, Riverside,  San Bernardino and beyond.

If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, call your health care provider before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

Seal Beach issues COVID-19 Mask Order

The Centers for Disease Control is advising that individuals use simple cloth face coverings when in public in addition to maintaining social distancing and practicing good hygiene. 

In order to help protect the vulnerable population in Seal Beach, all persons, including essential workers, shall wear face coverings such as fabric masks, scarves, bandannas, neck gaiters, or other fabric or layered paper face coverings when they leave home for essential activities. Specifically, the Order mandates that you must wear a mask when out in public conducting essential business, which is going to the store, the Post Office, doctor’s office, etc., within Seal Beach.

Until further notice, when you are in public and interacting with essential workers, you will need to wear a mask. 

What the Order does not do is restrict people from walking around the neighborhood without wearing a mask. If you are exercising and not conducting essential business or interacting with others, you do not have to wear a mask. The city recommends that people wear  face coverings anytime they are in public but they are not required by law to do so.  

Drivers traveling alone or with members of their households do not need to wear face coverings unless they must leave their vehicles or lower their vehicle windows to interact with first responders, medical personnel, service workers or other essential workers who are not members of their households.

Essential workers in grocery stores, drug stores and pharmacies, and restaurants where food is served for take-out shall also wear clean disposable gloves while working.  Employers of essential workers who interact with the public have to provide gloves and face coverings for use at work.

This order took effect on April 11 until further notice.

Everyone must continue to maintain appropriate social distancing and comply with all stay at home orders of state, county and local authorities, even while wearing face coverings. 

People are discouraged from using Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), such as N95 masks, which are being earmarked for frontline medical personnel.

Seal Beach City Manager Jill Ingram said: “We want everyone to comply with Gov. Newsom’s stay at home order, and those who must go outside can help protect others by taking the necessary precautions.”

Any violation of these or other orders shall be punishable as a violation of Seal Beach Municipal Code Section 3.25.030 and other applicable laws. The Seal Beach Police Department will continue to monitor public areas and essential businesses. To report violations of these orders, call (562) 799-4100, ext. 1. 

As the City of Seal Beach has declared a State of Emergency, the City Emergency Manager has the authority to implement this restriction in order to help protect the community. In Seal Beach, where approximately 40% of residents are over 65 years old and in the high-risk category, we have to be cautious in order to prevent any infections.  This Order and others that were issued by the City were reviewed and approved by the City Attorney to ensure the Emergency Manager had the legal authority to do so.

Seal Beach is not the only local city to implement a face covering order. The Cities of Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, Carson, Burbank, Long Beach, Pasadena, the Counties of Riverside and San Bernardino, and other jurisdictions recently ordered people to wear masks.  We hope that this Order will help slow the spread of infection, flatten the curve, and ultimately save lives. For updated information on the City’s response to this pandemic, visit the City of Seal Beach website at www.sealbeachca.gov.

Food Options for LWers

Leisure World is dealing with a “new normal” under Stay at Home orders issued in the wake of the coronavirus emergency. The Golden Rain Foundation is working to help people obtain food in the most efficient ways possible during this challenging time.

Grocery Store Hours

• Gelson’s Market is open from 7-8 a.m. exclusively for seniors 65-plus. One caregiver per shopper is permitted, proof of age is required. They are well stocked.

• Pavilions opens at 7 a.m. and asks that non-seniors stay home till 9 but is not enforcing it.

• Ralph’s is open from 6-7 a.m. for seniors. Traffic is restricted to 50 people at a time. 

• Sprouts is well-stocked with produce and has limited supplies of dairy and eggs. They are restricting quantities of certain items, and bulk items are sold pre-packaged only now. 

• Trader Joes is well stocked but limiting eggs and milk. Water available, paper goods are available intermittently. It is almost back to normal but controlling traffic when the store gets too full. Senior hours are now 8-9 a.m. for those 60-plus.

• Costco is open from 10 a.m. -6:30 p.m. with senior hours from 9-10 a.m. Don’t expect paper goods quite yet, though other items are well stocked.

On-Site Food Service

There is onsite grab-and-go food service available every evening at the Clubhouse 6 parking lot.  In case of rain, lines will form inside Clubhouse 6:

• Koffel’s Taco Tuesday truck, from 5-7 p.m. on Sunday, Tuesday and Friday. Check menus via LW Live alerts.

• Viking Specialty Hot Dog truck, 4-6 p.m., Mondays

• Gourmet Renee provides American cuisine from 4-7 p.m. on Wednesdays.

• Domino’s Pizza, starts at 3:30 p.m., Thursdays and is now here on  Saturdays from noon-2 p.m. It will deliver special orders to the parking lot if you call ahead, (562) 493-2212. 

• Lucille’s Smokehouse Bar-B-Que, 4-6 p.m. on Saturday, April 18 and April 25. Naples Rib Co. will take over on Saturdays in May.

All information is subject to change. On-call bus service is available starting at 4:30 p.m.; regular service before 4:30. Call (562) 431-6586, ext. 379

Information will be posted daily on the electronic marquee at the corner of Golden Rain Road and St. Andrews Drive.

Volunteers in Service

The Recreation Department is coordinating with volunteers who have stepped forward to assist shareholders/members with their shopping and errand needs. Contact the Recreation office at events@lwsb.com or (562) 431-6586, ext. 398, to be matched to a volunteer.  This is a free service, but any arrangements you make are between the two parties. GRF is simply sharing this information.

Downtown Cafe is Stocked

The Downtown Café in Building 5 is open for business with fully stocked vending machines. Food and drinks are available for take-out. Due to social distancing rules, the tables and chairs have been  temporarily removed.

Restaurant Delivery

Several local restaurants have reached out to the Recreation Department to offer pick-up and delivery service, some with specially priced menus during this difficult time. For information on specific restaurants, contact events@lwsb.com or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 398.

Perspectives Page 4

COVID-19 scams are on rise

—from the OC Council on Aging

 The criminal element has seized the opportunity to cash in on people’s fears in the COVID-19 outbreak, and new scams are springing up every day.

While the specifics of each scam may vary, the anatomy is the same. All the scams are built around some extraordinary offer, just for you, to allay your fears.

Most commonly, the COVID-19 scams include what appear to be legitimate offers: promises of a cure or access to limited testing or other medical resources, up-to-date tracking tools to keep you informed of COVID-19’s progress, or special offers to defer payments on everything from taxes to utility bills. However, the goal is not to provide anything of value, but to take what is valuable to your: your money, confidence and self-worth.

Government agencies including the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are watching legitimate companies for signs of COVID-19 related fraud. They aren’t able to watch over the many scammers trying to take advantage of people, many of whom are particularly vulnerable now. Consequently, watch out for illegitimate offers and fraud. Here are some tips to protect you from potential scams:

Red flags:

• Promise of a “quick” cure or “special” access to testing for COVID-19

• “Extraordinary” tools to track and keep COVID-19 away

• Access to “limited” resources if you respond quickly

• Personal Information must be provided to receive the “goods/services” being offered

How scams occur:

• Scammers use email, texts and phone contact to reach potential victims because in person communication is discouraged to slow the spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19).

• Offers via email and text usually include a link to click/activate to get your goods/services. If you click on the link, you will be redirected to a website that requires you enter your personal information to receive whatever is being offered. Clicking on the link may then allow harmful software to be loaded to your computer or tablet that steals your passwords, banking information or provides remote access to your computer.

Examples of current scams include:

• COVID-19 cures

• COVID-19 testing kit, made available only to a select group of individuals such as Medicare beneficiaries

• “Special” data about COVID-19, including local maps with real time tracking and information

• “Special” offers to extend deadlines or offer financial relief, just for “you”

Imposters:

• Offers may also be made from representatives of seemingly legitimate companies, organizations and government agencies to provide the most up to date information on COVID-19. They ask you to either click on a link and/or provide personal information to receive what’s being offered. These organizations don’t call or contact you for your personal information. Examples include:

» World Health Organization (WHO) and other large organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) are reporting that individuals pretending to be representatives of these organizations are contacting people by phone and email with offers of COVID-19 updates and requesting personal information to sign them up for this service.

» Individuals claiming to be from the IRS are contacting people to advise them of tax filing extensions or office closures, then asking for personal information to “document” that an extension has been granted or to “confirm” banking information.

» People purporting to be representatives from the Social Security Administration are contacting individuals to advise them that their accounts have been compromised and they need to “confirm” their personal information and/or banking information to ensure no delay in processing of their disability or retirement payments.

» People are receiving calls and emails from scammers pretending to be utility providers such as Southern California Edison offering free service or deferred payments for a limited time and to a limited number of individuals, first come-first served. They are asking people to  confirm their identity by personal information and a payment source.

» Scammers claiming to be from legitimate charities such as the Red Cross are calling for money or to sign people up to donate blood, both of which require disclosure of personal information.

These are just a few of the known scams related to CO-VID-19. Be vigilant as more scams are sure to appear in the days ahead.

Prevention:

Here are some simple ways to avoid COVID-19 scams:

• Practice skepticism. If you didn’t initiate contact with the person offering goods or services, assume it’s a scam.

• Look for generic greetings such as “Hello, Sir/Madame” indicating the sender is not sure of your gender, indicating the sender is a stranger.

• Be wary of links in email or text messages, even if you recognize the sender. Visit the known website of the company or organization allegedly offering goods or service rather than click on provided links if anything looks suspicious.

• Verify the legitimacy of the individual or company/organization by calling the known, published number for the company the individual purports to represent and ask for that employee by name.

 • Check the authenticity of charities through watchdog agencies such as Charity Watch (https://www.charitywatch.org/) or Charity Navigator at https://www.charitynavigator.org/.

• Never provide personal, banking, credit card, or investment information over the phone or in an email message unless you initiated the call or correspondence.

• Do not give in to pressure to “act now.” Important decisions regarding health and finances deserve careful thought and analysis. Don’t let your fears about COVID19 drive you to make bad decisions.

Recovery:

• If you provided sensitive information to a potential scam, don’t panic. Instead take the following steps to recover:

» Change the passwords for all of your accounts, especially if you use the same password for multiple accounts.

» Set up multi-factor authentication for all of you accounts so that you must prove your identity before account transactions or changes can be processed.

» Report Identity Theft to the three credit bureaus as follows:

Experian-Experian.com/fraudalert, (888) 397-3742

Transunion-Transunion.com/fraud, (800) 680-7289

Equifax-Equifax.com/CreditReportAssistance, (888) 766-0008

• Activate a credit freeze. If you don’t plan to make a large purchase requiring credit (like a house or a car), you can “freeze” your credit to stop any credit being opened under your identity, including credit cards, bank loans or real estate loans. Placing a credit freeze is free in California. You can lift or remove the freeze at any time. For additional details, visit consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0497-credit-freeze-faqs

• Report it: All scams should be reported to the Federal trade Commission at FTC.gov or (877) 382-4357.

Setting It Straight

An editing error in a story called “COVID-19: The Latest” on page 3 of the April 9 edition of the LW Weekly led to incorrect information on how to disinfect surfaces. The story should have read “Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser.” To make a bleach solution, mix five tablespoons (about 1/3 of a cup) of bleach per gallon of water or four teaspoons bleach per quart of water.

The correct answer for the April 9 Jumbles is: 

Jumbles: Shown, Flirt, Cozier, Policy

Answer: When it came to catching trout, the skilled angler was “PRO-FISH-IENT

Be a pen pal to someone

Residents at Brookdale Valley View, a senior living community in Garden Grove, would love to start up a pen pal program with Leisure World residents during this time of quarantine imposed by COVID-19.

The community is only 3.5 miles away, and many Brookdale residents once lived in Leisure World.

With all social gatherings restricted, writing letters to nearby pals would help everyone feel connected and provide a purpose to the day.

If you would like to socialize at a safe distance by sending a card, note or picture to a Brookdale resident, contact Theresa Adams at (714) 318-5860 or tadams32@brookdale.com, and she will provide the name and address of a pen pal.

Create a Family Safety Plan

Now more than ever it is important to create a Family/Safety Plan to address the needs for yourself and those you may be caring for.

The County of Orange is encouraging residents to create a family preparedness plan in the event they are impacted by COVID-19.  Having a family preparedness plan is the mainstay of planning for emergencies such as earthquakes and fires, and equally important during a health pandemic.

Residents are encouraged to reach out to trusted family, friends or neighbors who may be able to assist should a caregiver be diagnosed with COVID-19 and require hospitalization and/or isolation.

Taking the following steps can help alleviate the stress of an unforeseen health emergency and ensure their loved ones are cared for.

1. Discuss with family, friends or neighbors who would be able to assist should the caregiver require hospitalization and/or isolation.

2. Create an alternate plan for caregiving, whether it’s having an agency ready to step in and provide care or have planned with a care facility to receive your loved one in the event you (caregiver) needs the care.

3. Prepare important documents authorizing medical treatment, copies of medical cards and other important documents the alternate caregiver may need, i.e. medical powers of attorney and financial powers of attorney.

4. Go to ReadyOC.org (Make a Plan) to download Family Emergency Plan to gather and document pertinent information for your family and pet care needs.

5. Write down special instructions, food allergies, medications, nutritional needs or limitations, any other habits or routines may help to provide consistency.  

6. Pack a bag for a loved one in event that re-location is immediate.

Should you have any questions or need resources/referrals during this time, ontact Cindy Tostado, LCSW GRF Member Resource and Assistance Liaison, at 431-6586, ext. 317.

Government Page 5

Medicare covers COVID-19 tests

from medicare.gov

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), older adults and people who have severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease seem to be at higher risk for more serious COVID-19 illness. This means that most people with Medicare are at higher risk. Medicare can help in the fight against COVID-19.

Medicare will cover the lab tests for COVID-19, so recipients pay no out-of-pocket costs.

Medicare covers all medically necessary hospitalizations. This includes if you’re diagnosed with COVID-19 and might otherwise have been discharged from the hospital after an inpatient stay, but instead you need to stay in the hospital under quarantine.

At this time, there’s no vaccine for COVID-19. However, if one becomes available, it will be covered by all Medicare Prescription Drug Plans (Part D).

If you have a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have access to these same benefits. Medicare allows these plans to waive cost-sharing for COVID-19 lab tests. Many plans offer additional telehealth benefits. Check with your plan about your coverage and costs.

Scammers may use the coronavirus national emergency to take advantage of people while they’re distracted. As always, guard your Medicare card like a credit card, check Medicare claims summary forms for errors, and if someone calls asking for your Medicare number, hang up.

Telehealth & Related Services

Medicare has temporarily expanded its coverage of telehealth services to respond to the current public health emergency. These services expand the current telehealth-covered services, to help you have access from more places (including your home), with a wider range of communication tools (including smartphones), to interact with a range of providers (such as doctors, nurse practitioners, clinical psychologists, and licensed clinical social worker). 

During this time, you will be able to receive a specific set of services through telehealth including evaluation and management visits (common office visits), mental health counseling and preventive health screenings without a copayment if you have Original Medicare. This will help ensure you are able to visit with doctor from your home, without having to go to a doctor’s office or hospital, which puts you and others at risk of exposure to COVID-19.

You may be able to communicate with your doctors or certain other practitioners without necessarily going to the doctor’s office in person for a full visit. 

Medicare pays for “virtual check-ins”—brief, virtual services with your physician or certain practitioners where the communication isn’t related to a medical visit within the previous seven days and doesn’t lead to a medical visit within the next 24 hours (or soonest appointment available).

You need to consent verbally to using virtual check-ins and your doctor must document that consent in your medical record before you use this service. You pay your usual Medicare co-insurance and deductible for these services.

Medicare also pays for you to communicate with your doctors using online patient portals without going to the doctor’s office. Like the virtual check-ins, you must initiate these individual communications.

If you live in a rural area, you may use communication technology to have full visits with your doctors. The law requires that these visits take place at specified sites of service, known as telehealth originating sites, and get services using a real-time audio and video communication system at the site to communicate with a remotely located doctor or certain other types of practitioners. Medicare pays for many medical visits through this telehealth benefit. 

Seal Beach crime is down

The City of Seal Beach has released its annual crime statistics for the year 2019. Based on the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report standards,  serious crime is down by 12 percent.

Although not required by FBI standards, the Seal Beach Police Department includes in their analysis the crime of simple assaults.  With the inclusion of this, overall crime is down 8 percent. Simple assaults involve no serious injury. 

Notably, robberies are down 52 percent and stolen vehicles are down 29 percent.  

“Public safety is of the utmost concern for me and the City Council,” said Seal Beach City Manager Jill Ingram. “We are proud of this drop in crime and the efforts of the men and women of the Seal Beach Police Department.”

“The mission of the Police Department is to drive down crime and improve the quality of life in Seal Beach,” said Chief of Police Philip Gonshak. “We want our residents, visitors, and businesses to feel safe and secure. Although there are several factors that influence crime rates, we know that this reduction of crime is likely related to having more cops on the street. None of this could have been possible without the hard work of the City Manager, City Council, and City staff to ensure the police department had the tools to make this happen.”

For more information on the Seal Beach Police Department’s efforts to drive down crime, follow the department on social media @sealbeachpolice. 

GRF Board

Executive Session

1:00 p.m., 

Friday, April 17, 2020

Via Conference Call

NOTE: This meeting is closed to Shareholders/Members per Civil Code §4935

A. Call to Order

      President Stone

B. Roll Call

C. Legal

D. Contracts

E. Member Disciplinary 

    Actions

F. Personnel

G. Adjournment

“Agenda is Subject to Change”

Economic impact checks are coming

The U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service announced that Social Security beneficiaries who are not typically required to file tax returns will not need to file an abbreviated tax return to receive an Economic Impact Payment. Instead, payments will be automatically deposited into their bank accounts. 

“Social Security recipients who are not typically required to file a tax return do not need to take an action, and will receive their payment directly to their bank account,” said Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin. 

The IRS will use the information on the Form SSA-1099 and Form RRB-1099 to generate $1,200 Economic Impact Payments to Social Security recipients who did not file tax returns in 2018 or 2019. Recipients will receive these payments as a direct deposit or by paper check, just as they would normally receive their benefits.

The IRS said that by Friday, April 17, it plans to launch a “Where’s My Economic Impact Payment?” website and phone line. People will be able to check the status of their stimulus payments. If they are set to receive a check, but would prefer direct deposit, they can input account information. 

Economic Impact Payments Timeline

• The IRS was to issue approximately 60 million stimulus payment direct deposits on April 15 or shortly thereafter based on 2019 and 2018 tax return information. 

• As clients e-file additional 2019 returns, the IRS will update its files and issue payments to those clients on a weekly basis.

• The IRS will begin issuing paper checks around early May. 

• Approximately five million checks will be issued per week, beginning with the lowest Adjusted Gross Income and ending with the highest. 

• The IRS estimates it could take up to 20 weeks to issue all checks. 

 For more information, visit https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm967.

Schedule of Mutual Meetings 

Mutual residents are invited to attend the open meetings of their mutual boards. 

Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, meetings have been canceled, postponed or rescheduled via conference calls. The following Mutuals will have meetings through conference calls.

Thur., April 23 Mutual 1

Conference Call 9 a.m.

GRF Committee Meetings 

Golden Rain Foundation committee and board meetings are open to Leisure World residents. Due to the COVID-19 outbreak, meetings have been canceled or postponed until further notice.

CAP food distribution is today

Free food is available in Leisure World to eligible residents who are 60 years or older through Community Action Partnership of Orange County (CAPOC), which has a monthly distribution site by Clubhouse 4.  The next food distribution to today, April 16.

Every third Thursday from 9-11 a.m., qualified people receive 40 pounds of food, including  canned fruit, vegetables, meat, rice, juice, cereal and more.  

Eligible seniors must live in Leisure World, be at least 60 years of age and meet income guidelines as follows: up to $1,354 a month for one person; $1,832 for a two-person household; and $2,311 for a three-person household. To sign up, bring a photo ID, and proof of income (Social Security/SSI Statement, letter or bank statement or paycheck stub).

People who are unable to apply themselves or pick up the box of food may send a proxy to act on their behalf with appropriate ID. People who need help arranging a proxy can call GRF Member Resource Liaison Cindy Tostado at 431-6586, ext. 317.  

Health page 8

Changes to Meal Plans

Do you currently belong to a meal plan or want to join one and are wondering what to do during the COVID-19 emergency? Here is specific information for those already on a meal plan or who want to join one.

Congregate meals at senior centers throughout Orange County will be converted to take-home meals. Seniors age 60 and older can pick up take-home meals from their local senior center. Check with the organizations listed below for the most current information on locations near you.

If seniors are current clients of the congregate lunch programs at the senior centers and need their food delivered to them instead, they can request this through the same organizations listed below North/Central County cities: 

Meals on Wheels Orange County, (714) 220-0224 

www.mealsonwheelsoc.org

Arrangements have been made to ensure all seniors in the program will continue to have access to food. 

Specifically, the Office on Aging has: 

• Implemented contingency plans to convert warm lunches served at senior centers in group settings to frozen take-home meals.

• Executed a plan to have take-home meals delivered to seniors’ homes if they are unable or unwilling to pick up at the senior center.

• Implemented a process that allows take-home lunches from the senior center to be picked up by the seniors’ designee.

• Ensured home-delivered meals will continue without interruption. Deliveries will be less frequent and contain enough food for several days.

• Confirmed drivers have been trained to deliver food using safe distances and have been given gloves to use if seniors need food to be brought inside their homes. 

For more information, call the Information & Assistance Call Center at (800) 510-2020.

City of Seal Beach Senior Meals  Meals on Wheels, (562) 430-6079

• The City of Seal Beach and Orange County received a directive from the Office on Aging requesting that all congregate meals be delivered directly to participants to keep seniors in their homes. 

At this time, the city is passing out frozen meals in place of congregate meals that participants can take home and consume. Allotments contain enough food for multiple days. 

A five-meal package is being distributed to participants. Registered participants have been contacted about the delivery of meals to their homes. 

Meals are currently delivered to the city once per week for those who traditionally participate in the congregate meals program. 

In addition to offering meals delivered to the home, Meals on Wheels will supply the city with additional shelf-ready meals that can be stored at the North Seal Beach Center, 3333 St. Cloud Drive, and picked up in person Monday-Friday. Staff will also store additional meals at the Seal Beach Senior Center, 707 Electric Ave., and can distribute those to any resident who needs them upon request.

If anyone would like to be added to the program, he or she can go to the North Seal Beach Center from 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Monday-Friday, to fill out an intake form. This requirement only needs to be completed one time. Once the intake form has been submitted staff can begin delivering frozen shelf-ready meals. Also, if the person does not want deliveries to their home, he or she can send a designated person to pick the meals up at the North Seal Beach Center.

Meals on Wheels Long Beach, (562) 439-5000, ext. 2

www.mowlb.org

 For more information, email cynthiat@lwsb.com or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 317.

—Cindy Tostado, 

GRF member resources and assistance liaison

Chair Exercise

Want to practice at home so you will be fit and ready when we resume our regular class schedule?  Just ask Cathleen Walters and she will deliver a copy of the music to you at your home.  You need a CD player or be able to play music CDs on your computer or home stereo. Just call  Cathleen at (562) 598-9149 or email cathleen33@gmail.com. All music is provided free of charge. Donations are welcome.  

Cancer increases risk for COVID-19

Cancer Increases Risk for COVID-19 Complications

There are a number of reasons why people living with cancer have a more difficult time fighting off infections, and it all boils down to the disease’s impact on the immune system.

Cancer itself can interfere with the body’s normal immune response. Some cancers, for instance, change the way the immune system’s blood cells work. Others can damage the body’s tissues, making them more prone to infections.

Then there’s cancer treatment. Common therapies, including chemotherapy and radiation, weaken the immune system by lowering the number of white blood cells in the body. This makes it more difficult to fight off any infection, including a coronavirus infection, explains Eric Winer, an oncologist and chief clinical strategy officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

If you received cancer treatment in the past (not counting a bone marrow transplant), your immune system is likely no longer compromised, Winer points out. The risk is highest for those who are currently receiving treatment and those who recently stopped.

—-AARP

Plants as form of nature therapy

Nature therapy, also known as “forest bathing” can reduce blood pressure, lower stress, and even improve concentration and memory, among other benefits. You don’t have to live near a wooded area to reap the benefits. Incorporating organic elements into your home will help you stay in constant contact with nature. 

Below is a curated list of tips to help bring forest bathing into your home.

1. Create an indoor space for growing plants. Consider incorporating a green wall or mounted planter to add some life to an office or family room. You can also add plants to cabinets or window ledges.

2. Incorporate plants that act as natural air purifiers.

Peace Lily, Golden Pothos, English Ivy, Chrysanthemum, Gerbera Daisy, Mother-In-Law’s Tongue, Bamboo Palm, Azalea, Red-Edge Dracaena and the Spider Plant are some of the most recommended plants to help clean the air in your home.

3. Eat fresh herbs. Growing herbs in your home will add an element of green to your space, and fresh herbs are good for you, too. 

If you don’t have a green thumb, start with one of the easiest herbs to grow inside, such as mint or thyme.

Social Distancing and isolation can take a toll

Our world has changed drastically in a mere four weeks. We went from our typical daily routines to social distancing, quarantine and isolation in little time. For those who were already active and engaged, these folks have found ways to keep connections with others. Such as using telephones, video chatting, visiting from a 6-foot distance for instance. However, for those who are already struggling with isolation due to medical or mental health obstacles this can create even more of a challenge towards those fragile connections.

New terms and realities that we are coping with: 

1.  Social Distancing – also called “physical distancing”, means keeping space between yourself and other people outside of your home. This refers to a public health intervention that seeks to avoid face to face contacts that would limit disease transmission. Social Distancing needs to be practiced by the entire population to be effective.

 To practice social or physical distancing:

• Stay at least six feet away from other people

• Do not gather in groups

• Stay out of crowded places and avoid mass gatherings

2. Quarantine – Keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine helps limit further spread of COVID-19.

3. Isolation – Separate sick people from healthy people. People who are in isolation should stay home. In the home, anyone sick should separate themselves from others by staying in a specific “sick” bedroom or space and using a different bathroom when possible.

What can we do as a community to help those in need?

1. Reach out from a distance to let him/her know you are there. You can do this by telephoning or even leaving a note on the door with your telephone number.

2. Sharing relevant information with your neighbor. Keep it positive.

3. Picking up an extra meal for your neighbor.

4. If it’s safe for you to shop or run errands for the person, offer to pick up something or have it delivered.

5. Encourage your isolated neighbors to create a safety plan.

Remember that you are not alone, we are all in this together! Have questions? Contact GRF Member Resource Liaison, Cindy Tostado, LCSW (562)431-6586 ext. 317

—Cindy Tostado

GRF member resources and assistance liaison

OptumCare at the HCC

by Carson J. Blomquist

OptumCare

Whether it’s coronavirus, the flu, or measles, there has been a lot of news about diseases in the last few months. It can be pretty frightening, especially when there is so much incorrect information out there.

How can you keep yourself safe – and sane – when there is so much coverage? Start by minding your Ps and Qs:

Precaution: When there is news about an outbreak, find out what the basic precautions are. In most cases, it will be:

• Wash your hands. A good 20 seconds or more of handwashing with soap and water kills many of the germs we encounter. Wash your hands regularly.

• Stay home. Not feeling great? Call in sick and enjoy a day of rest. Catch up on your favorite books or shows. If you have a bug, you won’t spread it to others if you’re home. And if you don’t have a bug, well … we all need a day to relax.

• Cover up. Feel a cough or sneeze coming on? Cover your mouth and nose with your elbow – not your hands. If you can move away from others before it hits, even better. Sneezes can send germs up to ten feet away.

Prevention: There may not always be a vaccine for a disease, but if there is, get it. 

This is especially true for illnesses like influenza and bacterial pneumonia. These vaccines don’t just help you. They can help your family and neighbors. If a disease can’t infect you, you can’t spread it to others. 

Question: Are you really at risk? 

The news does a great job of sharing important information, but sometimes it can be difficult to understand. Find out who is at risk from the virus. People who have been traveling? People in a certain work industry? If you don’t match them, you’re probably at very low risk. Things change, of course, but always ask if you really are at risk. 

Whether it’s the flu or something new, mind your P’s and Q’s when the news comes on. Learn the basics about this virus, then go on with your day. And if you find yourself getting overwhelmed, do yourself a favor and turn the television off. 

Remember: this isn’t going to last forever. But it requires all of us to make an effort. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, consider calling a mental health support line. Optum’s Emotional Support Line is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at (866) 342-6892.

Learn more about virtual connection

by Lynn Baidack

LW contributor

Occasions with our whole family disappeared in mere moments with the outbreak COVID-19. The Baidack Clan missed its family dinners with the dining room table full of family and food. We all, each in our own way, remember these nights and hold them close. The sense of separation is discomforting and even with social media it still feels distant and artificial. For our family, texting and emailing during this difficult time, felt lonely and left us wanting more.

We decided to share a meal, whether cooking or eating. There were no rules—just be there. The table set, my meal was on the table, wine ready to be poured and I stared at the blank computer screen, waiting. One-by-one family members faces appeared on the computer screen and just like that, in real time, we were virtually together, though physically we were thousands miles apart. Everyone began chattering and laughing all at the same time across many miles. We took turns sharing menus and holding up our pots and plates while sipping wine. 

Our conversations gradually expanded into everybody’s latest adventures.

The use of technology has opened the path to bring our family together at the dinner table for a meal. These meals and moments will nurture and sustain us through the isolation brought by the COVID pandemic until we can physically be together again. 

Each Monday evening at 5, the Baidack Family will remain rooted and filled with gratitude as we share our evening meal.

How to stay connected

1. Learn the new technology

FaceTime, Zoom, Skype, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and lots more. All sorts of online options exist to talk with family and friends. And you don’t have to be tech-savvy. Doing the basics is easy, and for most people, fun. If setting up an account is daunting, ask a neighbor, niece or nephew for help and a quick tutorial.

2. Stay active in the community from home

It may sound counterintuitive. How can you remain a part of the community if the goal is to separate from the community? But maybe there’s a remote option. Many organizations — political parties, faith-based groups, nonprofits — rely on volunteers to make phone calls. You can do that clearly community-based activity right at home.

3. Go on a news diet

Stay informed, know what’s going on but don’t get locked into endlessly watching “breaking news” on the 24-hour news channels. Typically, not much changes hour to hour. But enduring the repetitious pummeling from TV all day long can bring needless anxiety. Try watching a news update in the morning, then check in again at night. Don’t stay with it all evening — 30 minutes or an hour is plenty.

4. Reach out to family and friends

Stay in touch with the people close to you, especially those who are social distancing too. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is recommending that communities create “buddy systems” to make sure vulnerable and hard-to-reach people stay connected, particularly to news about COVID-19. 

This can be done through your church, social group or daily neighborhood email blasts, such as Leisure World’s Facebook page. 

Social distancing does not mean social isolation, and even a potentially deadly virus should not force people to be alone. 

Now, more than ever, people need to find smart ways to stay connected.

The Art of Videoconferencing

Videoconferencing is becoming a way of connected life in Leisure World and beyond. Cocktail parties and family dinners are now being conducted via free applications like Zoom. Last week, Joe Osuna issued an invitation on Facebook to a Zoom cocktail party— “You are invited,” he wrote. “There is a dress code; please wear clothing. Just click the link and bring your own beverages.” To learn how to videoconference like a pro, read on.

In these days of isolation, videoconferencing services like Zoom have added millions of users as people seek to connect remotely in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

But although it’s easy to get up and running with Zoom, you may not be aware of some of its best, most useful features (many of which are buried in advanced setting menus). 

Here’s what you need to know to get the most out of the service, even if you’re using only the free, basic version:

• Beautify Your Face:

If you’ve just rolled out of bed, check the “Touch Up My Appearance” box in Zoom’s video settings menu. It acts like a soft-focus lens, adding a slight blur to skin tones and smoothing out wrinkles, blemishes, and other little imperfections.

• Hide Your Face: If you’d prefer not to be seen at all (and you’re not planning to speak in the meeting you’re attending) you can use a screenshot of yourself in a Zoom meeting as your profile picture. That way, you’ll always look perfect—and look like you’re paying attention.

Regardless of whether you’re ready to show your face, it’s a good idea to set Zoom to disable your camera and mic by default when joining meetings and enable the option to see a video preview before you join. That way, you can catch any stains on your shirt or spinach in your teeth.

• Hosts Can Mute Attendees

Most Zoom users are good about muting, but in large meetings there’s usually at least one person who forgets to hit that mute button and ends up broadcasting a private conversation, baby cries or worse.

What many hosts don’t realize is that they have the power to mute these rogue talkers. If you want everyone to join the meeting muted by default, you can make that happen by toggling “Mute Participants” upon entry in the Schedule Meeting section of Zoom’s account settings.

• Keep Unwanted Guests Out of Meetings

With huge numbers of people moving to Zoom and other videoconferencing platforms during the COVID-19 epidemic,  online meetings are dealing with a trend called “Zoombombing.” Don’t publicly share meeting IDs; if the meeting is public, don’t use your personal meeting ID (PMI).

Discounted POPS season tickets

Jeannie Berro from Mutual 2 is accepting a limited number of new members into her long-standing POPS season ticket group for 2020-2021 season. Seats are in the center loge, Section 111, and are  $95 for five concerts. They can be exchanged for floor seats if you are handicapped at no extra charge. The regular season ticket is $208.  Carpools will be arranged.

Dancing downstairs is allowed during concerts.

The schedule is 

• Oct. 17:  Elton John Tribute with Craig A Meyer on piano and vocals

• Dec. 19, Holiday Pops

• Feb. 20, 2021, Paul Shaffer (David Letterman’s sidekick) presents his favorite pop, R&B and jazz favorites with special guest and Motown legend, Valerie Simpson

• March 20, 2021, Hollywood Sings with vocalist Lori Zabka

• May 8, 2021, Musical Legacy of Chicago by Brass Transit.

See longbeachsymphony.org for subcriber-only benefits including flexible ticket exchanges and dining discounts for restaurants on concert and non-concert nights. 

Call Jeannie at (562) 284-6054 between 9 a.m.-8 p.m. for more information; seats limited, deadline April 14.

Grab and Go At a Glance

Grab ‘n’ Go Schedule 

Weekdays, 4-6 p.m., Saturdays, noon-2 p.m.

Clubhouse 6 Parking Lot

• Monday: Viking Dog Truck—Gourmet hot dogs, brats and loaded tots 

• Tuesday: Taco Tuesday—Mexican favorites plus hot dogs, burgers and fries

• Wednesday: Gourmet Renee—American cuisine, homemade soups and desserts

• Thursday:  Domino’s Pizza—Call ahead for special orders; wings and salads offered too

• Friday: Koffel’s Food Service—Special Friday menus weekly

• Saturday Lunch: Domino’s Pizza—Call ahead for special orders; wings and salads, noon-2 p.m.

• Saturday Dinner: Lucille’s Bar-B-Que—Preorder to avoid long lines.

• Sunday:  Koffel’s Food Service —Special Sunday menus weekly

 All Grab ‘n’ Go events will take place, rain or shine. If it rains,  Clubhouse 6 will be open. People must keep a six-foot distance and wear a mask. All vendors accept cash and cards. On call bus service available from 4:30 p.m. when regular service  ends. Call (562) 431-6586, ext. 379

Watch for LW Live! alerts for daily menus. Sign up for LW Live at http://www.lwsb.com/lw-live-sign-up/.

City of Los Al Food Distribution

The City of Los Alamitos Recreation and Community Services Department is providing free groceries sponsored by Second Harvest Food Bank to adults 60 years and older at the Los Alamitos Community Center, 10911 Oak St. Distribution takes place weekly on Tuesdays from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.  on a first-come, first-served basis to the first 120 participants. 

Distribution is held in the Community Center parking lot in a “drive through” style, and participants are not encouraged to arrive early due to space restrictions. 

Grocery items consist of non-perishable food items and self-care items. For more information, contact Erika Halberg at ehalberg@cityoflosalamitos.org.

Friendship Club

The Friendship Club will be on hiatus through May. Technology classes will tentatively resume June 8 on the club’s regular schedule of the second and fourth Monday of the month in Clubhouse 3, Room 4. Check LW Weekly for the schedule. 

For information about schedule and classes, contact Miryam Fernandez at mzzmimm@gmail.com or Bob Cohen at bob@bobology.com.For free technology training opportunities, go to www.bobology.com.

Radio Club

The Radio Club provides an opportunity for a Family Radio Service (FRS) practice drill every Wednesday morning. Anyone who has an FRS radio is invited to participate as follows:

• Call-in time begins at 9:30-9:45 a.m.

• Use Channel 13/0.

• Be sure to wait until the radio is clear and call in stating your first name, last name initial and mutual: example “John S., Mutual 13” checking in. Remember to press the side button to speak and release when finished.

If you are not sure how to call in and would like more instruction on use of the FRS radio, contact Leisure World Radio Club President Rich Erickson, rjerxn@yahoo.com, or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 409, to leave a message.

Curbside pick-ups at the Library

The Leisure World Library staff is working diligently to create innovative ways to deliver its services to the community. People can now order materials by calling or emailing the library. Materials will be ready for a curbside pick-up in about 48 hours. 

To request materials:

• Call the library at (562) 598-2431, Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m.-to 2 p.m.. 

• Or email LWLibrary@lwsb.com and include your name, library card number, phone number and what kinds of materials you like to read and/or watch.

Library staff will accommodate specific requests whenever possible. If the requested material is not available, library clerks will use  their expertise to find similar items for you and put together a bag of materials for you to borrow from the library.

Due to limited staffing, 48 hours, excluding weekends, is required to fill requests. You will receive a call when your order is ready for curbside pick up at the library between Tuesday-Friday. 

If you have yet to visit the library and get your own library card number, call for a temporary card number until the library re-opens.

Staff is available to answer questions via phone or email Tuesday-Friday from 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Mobility Aids loaners are available

The Golden Age Foundation Mobility aids program is being offered on a limited basis. People who need walkers or wheelchairs can call the GAF answering machine at (562) 431-9589 and leave a message. Volunteers will return calls and make appointments with residents to pick up equipment. Do not return equipment until further notice to minimize person-to-person contact. The program loans walkers, both fold-up with tennis ball feet and deluxe walkers with four wheels, a seat and hand brakes, transport chairs and wheelchairs. 

LW Poetry

This poetry feature showcase original poems by members of the Creative Writers Club of Leisure World and other GRF members. The Creative Writers meet on the fourth Friday at 1:30 p.m. in Clubhouse 3, Room1, for poetry, fiction and non-fiction; business meeting follows.

Seal Beach Pier

Long wooden pathway

Cross the sand and wave

Endless steps of

Young lovers, couples, and singles

Blue sky with white soft cottons

Hugging all

Emerald water beneath dances 

To the music of footsteps

One, two, three and tango fast

Fishing poles nodding like a sleepy old man

Fishes in the water play the game

Catch me if you can

But the all the buckets are empty

That’s the way it works

We all swim and walk in this perfect day

at Seal Beach Pier

—Chung Hur

Friends of the LW Library

Friends of the Leisure World Library volunteers will deliver a bag of books to residents who call it and request one, according to Cynthia Arance, Friends of the Library president. People can ask for their favorite authors or genre, and Flo Conley and Cynthia will deliver them.

Cynthia hopes the service will highlight Friends’ purpose of funding the LW Library and giving two scholarships to local schools. 

To order a bag of books for $5, contact floconley@gmail.com or call (714) 350-7682. Friends volunteers are also putting out free magazines at the bookstore for people to take.

Creative Writers Club

The Creative Writers’ Club is canceling its poetry contest for this year. The club will not meet until the covid threat is past.  Everyone is encouarged to keep writing (poetry, fiction, non-fiction) in “isolation.” “When we do meet again, we will have lots to share,” said Fred Wind, club president.

Community Karaoke

Community Karaoke singers are missing their weekly Wednesday sessions in Clubhouse 1. Many of us are listening to music on the radio and other devices during this time of social distancing. We’ll be ready to take the stage and entertain our neighbors and friends once again when this is over.

Singing has been so important for us senior folks. It has helped some with our lungs as our breathing is better; some of us get happier when we sing; some of us get more courage when our efforts are applauded. All of this motivates us to continue singing.

We miss our karaoke audience too. They come week after week to cheer us on. You can see them smile when they hear a familiar tone that they like. 

Sometimes they’ll tell the vocalist, “Thank you for singing that song. I remember dancing to that tune.”  

Hopefully we’ll see you soon for our karaoke parties. 

—Margie Thompson

Sports and Games, page 15

LW Men’s Club

Marvin Jones remains the club president

The current president of the Leisure World Men’s Golf Club is Marvin Jones – a resident of Mutual 7. He assumed his duties in the beginning of 2020.  His goal is to build on the current membership  of about 60 men and grow its activities as soon as the golf courses open back up. 

Marvin was born in 1935 in Pensacola, FL. He graduated from Auburn University with a degree in Aeronautical Engineering but never practiced. After college he joined the Army for 3 years and was a member of an Airborne unit. He subsequently found his way into investment banking, financial planning and the securities business. He owned his own securities firm for 13 years and later worked with larger firms.

Marvin married Geri Jones in 1964 in Las Vegas (and no – Elvis did not marry him). He has one son and two grandchildren living in Long Beach. His favorite things to do are golfing, reading, jigsaw puzzles, attending concerts, dancing and playing social games. At one point in his life he was a full-time handyman and still enjoys doing little chores for his friends and neighbors.

He has been playing golf for 18 years. He holds a 14 handicap on our local course and probably a 20 on the outside. His favorite nearby course is Recreation Park in Long Beach. 

The Men’s Club that Marvin leads normally sponsors as many as four tournaments a month on the local course. The second and fourth Wednesdays are for members of the Men’s Club only. The third and fifth Wednesday (if there is one) are the Guys and Gals tournament. All games and tournaments are postponed until golf courses are back open to the public and stay home orders have been lifted.

Requirements are that you be a Men’s Club member and have a handicap. Additionally, the Club hosts a catered summer picnic and a Christmas party for its member, friends and guests. If you are interested in becoming a member once COVID-19 has subsided, leave a message for the membership chair at (801) 674-5975.

—David LaCascia

Cribbage player Evelyn turns 90

Evelyn “Evie” Ingram of Mutual 11 celebrated her 90th birthday on March 29 in front of her unit. Several of her friends and neighbors stopped by (at reasonable distances) to observe the occasion with champagne and cake – plus a rousing version of Happy Birthday. Conversations naturally revolved around the current health crisis but typically came back to remarking about her age, how youthful she appears and her good health. She remarked that she had good genes with parents who lived long and healthy lives. 

Evie had one older brother – a pianist for Woody Herman – who passed at the age of 69. Evie married Clifton “Bud” Alexander Ingram in 1950 and divorced in 1981. With him she has had two daughters and one son. Sadly, only one daughter remains. The surviving daughter is 69 and everyone that knows her says she looks 50 and inherited her mother’s good genes.  With six grandchildren, 11 (possibly more) great-grandchildren, and one great-great-child, Evie enjoys spending time with all of them.

Evie lived on the east coast in her early life and resided in several states. Her hometown is Belmont, Massachusetts – a few miles northwest of Cambridge. She moved from the east to California in 1951, shortly after her marriage. She says she has been gone from the east coast for so long she no longer “pawks da caw”.

She attended the University of New Hampshire for three years and completed her degree at the University of Alabama.

Evelyn was in a serious car accident last year and after an extended rehabilitation came back strong but is required to use a cane to walk any distance. Her passions here at Leisure World are card games including bridge, cribbage and poker.

—David LaCascia

Religion pages 6-7

Beit HaLev

Rabbi Galit Shirah has spent the past few weeks trying to navigate through ‘techno-hell.’  This week, we celebrate the last day of the Festival of Passover. Shabbat Shalom LIVE! the livestream arm of Beit HaLev, will broadcast from Facebook live on facebook.com/galityomtov. The Torah reading for Thursday, April 16, is from Deuteronomy 15:19-16-17; in addition to the Festival Hallel service, there will also be a Yizkor (Memorial) service.

Join Beit HaLev on Friday evening, April 17 for Kabbalat Shabbat on facebook.com/galityomtov at 6 p.m. and Shabbat morning (Saturday) at 10:30 a.m.  The Torah portion “Sh’mini” (Eight)  will be read; the sacrificial offerings begin on the ‘eighth’ day following the ordination of the high priests; the deaths of Aaron’s two elder sons is related and “Aaron is silent.”

Weekday Ma’ariv (evening) services are held Monday-Thursday at 4 p.m. for SimShalom.com. There is a different rabbi each day and Rabbi Galit Shirah’s day is Thursday. A chat area where you can converse interactively with the rabbis and our global congregation is available for interaction.

Rabbi-Cantor Galit teaches leyning (chanting) of Torah and Haftarah, Prayerbook and Modern Hebrew lessons.  Classes will start again soon. Anyone interested in lessons should contact Rabbi-Cantor Galit Shirah at (562) 715-0888 or email her at duets@icloud.com.

Assembly of God

You’ll be amazed by what God can do

by Pastor Sam Pawlak

Assembly of God

This coming Sunday, I will continue my 10 a.m. Facebook message, always one of encouragement and hope in these trying times.

Many things feel out of control and our routines are not running smoothly. When our lives are predictable, we feel more secure. These days of uncertainty make us realize that we are not in control, so rather than bemoan the fact that our comfort zone has been shaken, we should try to look to God and trust Him.

Isaiah 12:2 says, “Surely God is my salvation, I will trust Him and not be afraid, He is my strength and my song.” A paraphrase of Proverbs 3:5 is “…trust God from the bottom of your heart; don’t try to figure everything out on your own.  Listen for God’s voice in everything you do … He’s the one who will keep you on track.” God is predictable, he is always with us and will protect us.

When you feel most vulnerable, sing a favorite chorus or hymn, fill your mind and heart with words of encouragement, often written years ago by someone who was experiencing the same loss of control and distance from one another. You’ll be amazed at what the Lord can do.   

Holy Family Catholic Church

Holy Family Parish is joining in prayer (Rosary, Chaplet of Divine Mercy, Hail Mary, etc) every day at 3 p.m. for the complete evaporation of the coronavirus from the face of the earth. Also, join Bishop Vann as he prays the Rosary live from Christ Cathedral each Tuesday at 4 p.m. You can watch the Rosary live at Facebook.com/ChristCathedralCA, ChristCathedralMass.com and on the Diocese of Orange Vimeo channel.

First Christian

Rejoice Always

by Pastor Bruce Humes

First Christian Church

In Paul’s first letter to the Thessalonians we see one of the shortest verses in God’s word. It comes in chapter 5, verse 16, and it reads, “Rejoice always.” (NKJV) This may be a short verse, but it speaks volumes. The word rejoice gives us the idea of being cheerful, calmly happy, well off, glad or even joyful. “Always” means at all times, or evermore. 

You might be thinking, Paul, are you telling me that even in difficult times and many different hardships I’m to be cheerful and glad?

I was thinking about this, and came to the conclusion that no matter how bad things seem to get, we always have something to be thankful for. 

In our current situation, I am thankful for electricity. Think about it, hot showers, an oven for cooking, a refrigerator to keep the food fresh, even a microwave to quickly heat something up even though we can’t go anywhere except to get back to the TV before the commercial is over. Running water, food to go into the refrigerator and stock the shelves, a warm bed, a roof over my head to keep the rain out are all things to be thankful for. 

In verse 18 Paul writes, “in everything give thanks.” Yes, we have a lot to be thankful for, however, the one thing that we as Christians, as born again believers should be thankful for is our Lord and savior Jesus Christ. No matter what we are going through, he is the one that we put our trust and our hopes in. He is the one we call on in prayer to lead a world and nation that has lost its way. 

In verse 17, Paul says, “Pray without ceasing,” so, that is what we do, we pray for God to intervene in the affairs of man to bring answers to the current pandemic that seems to be out of man’s control. We pray for God to guide and give wisdom to those working to find a solution, we pray for God’s will to be done in all these things

We just celebrated the resurrection of our savior, Jesus Christ, let’s put all our trust and hope in him.

If you wish to speak to someone at the church or if you have a need, please call the church office at  (562) 431-8810.  Leave a recorded message and someone will get back to you as quickly as possible. 

faith christian assembly

Jesus is God’s saving gift to us

by Pastor Sheri Leming

Faiith Christian Assembly

Have you washed your hands?

We’ve probably never heard the command to wash our hands in our lives more than we have as of late. In an effort to keep the coronavirus from spreading, we have been instructed again and again to be sure to thoroughly wash them.  

When your hands are dirty, of course the only course of action is to wash them. In Matthew 27: 24, Pontius Pilate thought that washing his hands would clear him of the guilt of handing Jesus over for crucifixion when the crowds demanded that he release Barabbas instead of Jesus.

And people are still searching, often in vain for a way to become clean…truly clean and  to have their sins–their guilt–washed away. Like Pilate, they try their own methods of washing their hands.

They try to clean themselves up with good works, but as hard as people may try to be perfect and earn their way to heaven, they quickly realize that this is never going to happen on their own. Our own humanity is impossible to deny.

So since none of us can do this, God came up with a much better plan. We can trust in Jesus in John 14:6, “Jesus answered, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” He was the only perfect person who ever lived, because he was God. He came so we could know what God is like. By trusting and establishing a relationship with him, you get in on his goodness.

1 John 1:9 tells us that “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness,” (NIV). 

A great old hymn asks a life changing question, “Have you been to Jesus for the cleansing power? Are you washed in the blood of the Lamb?” The hymn echoes Psalm 24:3-4, “Who may ascend the mountain of the Lord? Who may stand in his holy place? The one who has clean hands and a pure heart.”

LW Baptist

The joy of fellowship with Jesus

by Pastor Rolland Coburn

Lw Baptist

The joy of fellowship with Jesus is the Christians’ portion. Jesus gives them power for living. The apostle Paul confesses, “For me to live is Christ, and to die is gain.” Peter testifies how Jesus presented himself alive after his suffering, “not to all the people, but to us witnesses chosen before by God, who ate and drank with Him after He arose from the dead.” John the apostle certifies, “What was from the beginning, what we have heard, what we have seen with our eyes, what we beheld and our hands handled, concerning the Word of Life—we proclaim to you also, so that you too may have fellowship with us . . . with the Father, and with His Son Jesus Christ . . . to make our joy complete.”

John documents their 40  days fellowship with the risen Christ. Jesus showed himself alive to the apostles and the other believers on resurrection night in the upper room: “See my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me, and see. For a spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see that I have. And when he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. And while they still disbelieved for joy and were marveling, he said to them, ‘Have you anything here to eat?’  They gave him a piece of broiled fish, and he took it and ate before them.” 

Jesus had previously warned, “Very truly I tell you, you will weep and mourn while the world rejoices. [But] I will see you again and you will rejoice, and no one will take away your joy.”

Joyful fellowship with their living Lord is still something all Christians’ experience. One writer observes, “Time has not faded the vividness of his [Jesus’] image. Poetry still sings his praise. He is still the Living comrade of countless lives.” 

Praise expresses the Christian’s testimony, “Walking with Jesus, walking every day, all along the way.” “Every day with Jesus is sweeter than the day before.” “What a friend we have in Jesus.”

Someday believers will all sit down to banquet at the Lamb’s marriage supper. “I grant you,” Jesus told the apostles, “that you may eat and drink at my table in my kingdom.” He promised, “Many will come from east and west, and sit down at the table with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven.” 

What a day of rejoicing! And in the meantime “richer, fuller, deeper, Jesus’ love is sweeter, sweeter as the years go by.”

Congregation Sholom

Cantor Marla Barugel will be streaming services marking the eighth and final day of Passover today at 9:30 a.m. The Yizkor memorial service will be recited. To view, visit the Congregation Sholom of Leisure World Facebook page. 

Rabbi Karen Isenberg will be streaming Friday night services at 5:30 p.m on April 17 on Congregation Sholom’s Facebook page. Join Rabbi Eric Dangott on Facebook for Saturday morning services at 9:30 a.m. on April 18.  

The book club currently reading “The Weight of Ink” by Rachel Kadish. For more information about the club, call Ruth Herman at 430-3107.

Community Church

Stream services on Facebook live or listen to recording through office phone

by Rev. Johan Dodge

Community Church

Are you missing worship?  

Do you have Facebook on your smartphone?  

Join the live-streamed Sunday worship on Facebook Live for the seven Sundays of Easter and Pentecost.  

You can participate in worship with Community Church online through Facebook Live at www.facebook.com/pages/Leisure-World-Community-Church

If conditions change sooner and we can gather in person, all are welcome to come and join us in person. Of course, when that time comes, if you have a church community that you can go back to, we encourage you to go there.  

If you don’t have access to Facebook, you are always welcome to call (562) 431-2503 to listen to the message.  

Blessings to you in this Easter Season and remember you are never alone.  

Community, 9-11

COvid-19

How to prevent your glasses from fogging up while wearing a mask

by Laurie Bullock

laurieb@lwsb.com

The state of California  is now  requiring everyone to wear  something to cover their face while conducting essential errands or while working at an essential business (see page 3 for more details). While people are coming up with inventive ways to create and wear their own masks to help protect themselves and others, some are running into the problem of their glasses fogging up while their mask is on.

The main reason someone’s glasses fog up while wearing a mask is because the mask isn’t fitting on the nose as snug as it should be. Masks naturally direct hot, moist air directly upward and onto the cool glasses, which creates the layer of fog. Even when wiped away, it will continue to form as long as nothing is done.

Luckily, there are a few things that you can do to keep your glasses from fogging up while you have a mask on. 

1. Fold the top part of your mask down.

If you have a mask without a wire, fold down the top fourth of your mask before wearing it. This will help create a small amount of space for the air to leave your mask without fogging up your glasses. The only issue with this method is that it shrinks the side of your mask. Remember that your mask should completely cover your nose and mouth, so only do this if you can still cover your nose and mouth without any problems

2. Washes your lenses with soapy water.

While not a permanent fix, one way you could prevent your glasses from fogging without making any alterations to your mask is to wash your glasses with soapy water, according to a 2011 study on surgeons with glasses.

Before wearing the mask, wash your glasses with soap and water (make sure to wash your hands before touching the glasses). Let air dry or gently dry them with a soft cloth or tissue. The soap will leave a clear film that should block condensation from forming for a few hours. You can repeat this trick throughout the day.

3. Put a folded tissue inside the top of your mask.

Fold a tissue into a rectangle and attach it to the inside of your mask so that it lies on the bridge of your nose. This will help absorb some of the condensation and prevent your glasses from fogging up.

Remember, the best way to stay safe and healthy is to wash hands for more than 20 seconds consistently. Using a mask will not be effective if you don’t wash hands before and after meals, touching something, or touching your face. If you do wear a mask, make sure you wash and dispose of them properly and resist the urge to touch your face while it is on.

SBTV Listing

SBTV-3 airs on TWC-Spectrum Channel 3, Frontier Fios Channel 37 and online streaming at sbtv3.org/schedule. Have Roku? Go to http://roku.streamsource.tv/add/sbtv. The playback schedule is available at SBTV3.org.

Thursday, April 16

4 pm Drone Club/Quilting Bees

4:20 pm LW’s Rollin’ Thunder

4:30 pm Harmonizing Humanity #40

5 pm Velvetones Concert

6  pm 2019 Simbang Gabi 

7 pm Life and Times:

Virginia Haley

8 pm On Q—8bit Jazz Heroes

9 pm Americana Awards

10 pm Bob Cole Conservancy

Friday, April 17

4 pm LW’s Rollin’ Thunder

4:10 pm Velvetones Concert

5 pm FALW Valentine’s Day

6 pm Mystery at the Theater

6:32 pm Sea Inside

7 pm Seal Beach City Limits

Richard Hastings 

8 pm Life and Times-Virginia Haley

9 pm Cerritos Center-

Golden Dragon Acrobats

10:37 pm Cerritos Center-

The Four Tenors

Saturday, April 18

4 pm Drone Club/Quilting Bees

4:20 pm LW’s Rollin’ Thunder

4:30 pm Harmonizing Humanity 

5 pm McGaugh Patriotic Show

6 pm 2019 Simbang Gabi

7 pm Ocean Perspectives

8 pm LAUSD

10 pm Cerritos Center-Matt Mauser

Sunday, April 19

4 pm SB City Council Meeting

replay 4-13

5 pm McGaugh 1st Grade Concert

6:30 pm McGaugh Go West!

7:30 pm Life and Times-Virgnia Haley

8:30 pm Cerritos Center-

Riders in the Sky

10:15 pm Americana Awards

Monday, April 20

4 pm Harmonizing Humanity

4:30 pm LW Rolling Thunder

4:39 pm National Parks/Drone Club

5 pm FALW Valentines

7 pm Americana Awards 

9 pm Cerritos Center-

In the Mood

11:10 pm Vintage Vehicles

Tuesday, April 21

4 pm Harmonizing Humanity

4:30 pm LW Rollin’ Thunder

4:39 pm National Parks/Drone Club

5 pm FALW Valentine’s Day

6 pm Simbang Gabi

7 pm McGaugh Patriotic Show

8 pm Cerritos Center-Matt Hauser

10 pm Cerritos Center-

In the Mood

11:40 pm Sea Inside

Wednesday, April 22

4 pm Mystery at the Theater

4:32 pm 2019 Simbang Gabi

5:30 pm Vintage Vehicles 

6 pm Drone Club/National Parks

6:30 pm Aquarium of the Pacific

7 pm On Q-8bit Jazz Heroes

8 pm Seal Beach City Limits-

Richard Hastings

9 pm Cerritos Center-

Golden Dragon Acrobatics

10:37 pm Cerritos Center-

The Four Tenors

*All programming is subject to change.

Paws, Claws and Beaks

Cat tail language: what your cat’s tail says about

 

their mood 

Whether you know it or not, cat tails serve a greater purpose than simply looking cute and fluffy. Cats use their tails to communicate and to express their emotions. The only problem is that you won’t know what they’re saying if you don’t know how to “speak cat.” If you’ve always wondered what your cat’s tail is trying to tell you, and you want to learn what different cat tail positions mean, here are a few helpful tips to help you master cat tail language. 

Why Do Cats Move Their Tails? 

Like all sentient beings, cats use both verbal and nonverbal communication to express their emotions and moods. One of the biggest nonverbal communication tools for cats is their tail. Russell Hartstein, certified dog and cat behaviorist and trainer and CEO (Canine Executive Officer) of Fun Paw Care in Los Angeles, notes that “Cat tails are incredibly expressive, and when taken in context to their immediate environment and the rest of their body language, reveal a lot about what is going on emotionally and internally with your cat.” 

According to Hartstein, aside from trying to communicate, cats also move their tails to stay balanced.

“Part of the reason why cats usually land on their feet after falling or jumping is due to the counterbalancing function of their tail, which helps stabilize quick moves and turns,” he says.

What Do Different Cat Tail Signs Mean?

By looking at cat tail signs, we can deduce a lot about a cat’s mood. Michael Rueb, operations manager for the National Cat Protection Society in Spring Valley, California, notes that “even though there are certain basics that pet parents can bet on when interpreting cat tail language, being mindful of the cat’s whole body will give you the clearer picture about what emotions your cat is experiencing.” 

Pet experts point out a few specific cat tail signs for pet parents to take note of:

Tail Wrapping

When your kitty wraps her tail around you or others, she is showing affection, relaxation and love. This usually means she is open to being petted and receiving human contact. However, there are other

times when your feline may wrap her tail and but is not interested in interacting with others.

“Sometimes your kitty will wrap her tail when she is solo, asleep or sitting,” Hartstein says. “Although typically relaxed in this position, this cat tail language may indicate your cat is not interested in interaction or wants to be left alone.”

Hence, it is important that pet parents consider the environment and overall cat body language before making assumptions about their kitty’s emotional state.

Loose Tail vs. Tucked Tail

A loose, horizontal tail implies a relaxed cat and neutral state of emotion, but as soon as the tail appears to be lower or tucked, this may paint a completely different picture, explains Hartstein. If your cat’s tail is held low, this typically means that she is feeling fearful or nervous, “especially if her tail is tucked underneath her body,” explains Rueb.

Both Hartstein and Rueb urge pet parents to be cautious of lowered cat tails, as these usually mean that the cat is in a state of fear, retreat, aggression or hostility.

Upright Tail

When a cat stands tall and holds her tail high, “it usually means she is confident and happy,” explains Rueb. Walking with an upright tail is an indication that your cat is comfortable, sociable and looking to engage with others around her.

Hartstein adds that an upright cat tail position is a sign of an affable cat looking to connect or commune.

“If she gives you a little flick in the upright portion of the tail, consider it an invitation to share some love,” he says.

Arched/Puffed Tail

If your cat is arching or puffing out her tail, steer clear of her path.Pet experts Hartstein and Rueb note that these cat tail signs indicate your cat is not happy, perhaps because she is feeling threatened, which may result in aggressive behavior.

“In some cases, when a cat becomes nervous, she will puff her tail out, theoretically to look bigger to the perceived threat,” Rueb says.

If you notice this behavior in your feline, avoid triggering her. “A cat will attack if she feels she has no other choice to alleviate the fear or perceived danger in the present environment,” warns Hartstein.

Wagging Tail

We often associate a dog’s wagging tail with happy emotions and excitement, but what does it mean in cat language?

“A lashing or wagging tail for cats never means happiness- rather, it is a very clear warning sign that something is making the cat upset, stressed, nervous, and that she could become aggressive if whatever is bothering her does not stop,” Hartstein says.

Rueb adds, “At The National Cat Protection Society, we often have to tell people that when they are petting a cat and their tail starts slapping the ground back and forth, that it may be time to stop, as the cat has probably had enough and may be feeling overstimulated.”

Pet parents will usually be able to tell something is bothering their feline by paying attention to the other cat body language accompanying her wagging tail.

 Get to Know Your Kitty’s Personality

Building a good relationship with your feline friend can be tricky, as we are different species and have different preferences when it comes to socialization, contact and communication.

Rueb emphasizes that every kitty has a unique personality, so while “Many cats will find it ok to be picked up, petted, cuddled and even kissed, for some cats, it can cause confusion and annoyance.” 

Rueb recommends not petting your cat too much and letting her come to you first, so she feels comfortable with your presence and touch.

Cat tail signs and other nonverbal signs are good indicators of how your feline is feeling. Rueb suggests always looking for these cues when interacting with your kitty.

“In my experience, too often people only stop petting when the cat becomes annoyed and swats at them,” Rueb says. “In most cases, the cat was giving them a ton of other body signals indicating that she was getting annoyed, which they did not look for or did not notice.”

If you need expert cat advice on how to build a strong relationship with your kitty, check out Jackson Galaxy’s “Total Cat Mojo: Everything You Need to Know to Care for Your Favorite Feline Friend” or get some pointers from “97 Ways to Make a Cat Like You.”

Hartstein encourages pet parents to meet their cat’s needs and understand their behavior by learning about their feline’s body language and becoming acquainted with cat tail language.

– from Chewy.com

RV Club

Due to the continuing threat of the coronavirus, the Leisure World RV Club is suspending its club activities until September. It hopes that the restrictions will pass by then and it can resume activities with a picnic on the Clubhouse 1 green.

Stay at home

Picked up projects during the pandemic

Have you picked up any projects that you had either put off starting or stopped because you were too busy? Whether its finally organizing your closet or creating a herb and vegtable garden, we want to see what you’ve been up to. Send a short article about your project, finished or currently in process, to laurieb@lwsb.com. Pictures must be in .jpeg format.

It’s important to remember that there is no pressure to be productive during this time. How you use your time is up to you, and if you need to rest and wait until quarentine is over to start projects again, that is completely fine. 

Recreation

2020 Honor Banners are now available

The Golden Rain Foundation and the Recreation Department are offering Veterans Honor Banners for sale again, but only a few spaces remain.  

The banners will be posted throughout the community on trust streets and the newly purchase ones will fly along the golf course. 

Those interested may honor current or former GRF members in good standing. The name used will be the full legal name, used on the stock certificate of Golden Rain Foundation or deed, in the case of Mutual 17. GRF membership will be verified by the Stock Transfer and Recreation Office. 

The banner will also include the veteran’s mutual number and  the military branch under which they served. The cost is $150 and orders will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis while the limited supply lasts.  

The banners will be displayed for Memorial Day. If you have previously purchased a banner you can opt to pick it up from Recreation or donate it and have it redisplayed, subject to space available. All sales are final, and no refunds will be given. For more information call (562) 431-6586 x324, or send an email to thomasf@lwsb.com.

stay at home

How to protect your mental health while in self-isolation

Staying at home plays an important role in preventing the spread of infectious diseases. But this doesn’t mean that coping with the disruption in your normal routine is easy. Taking care of your mental health is essential during these unprecedented times.

Spending time in quarantine can take a serious mental and emotional toll. The isolation imposed by quarantine frequently leaves people feeling that they have no control over the situation. It can make people feel cut off from the rest of the world and unable to perform their usual duties. 

Your current mental health, how you deal with stress,your personality  and how long you are in quarantine are all things that will factor into how you deal with self isolation. Luckily, there are a few things that you can do to help cope during this time in isolation. 

Establish a routine- The disruption of your normal daily activities can be one of the most difficult aspects of quarantine. This can leave you feeling directionless as you try to figure out how to fill all the hours of the day. This is why it’s important to try to create a daily schedule to help fill the time.

Talk to others-Reaching out to other people by ways of call, text, email or FaceTime, not only helps with boredom, but it is also critical for minimizing the sense of isolation. Talking to others who are going through the same thing can provide a sense of community and can help you through difficult times

Stay informed- It’s natural to  experience anxiety when you feel like you don’t have access to the information that they need. On the other hand, it can be overwhelming to be constantly immersed in reports that focus on inaccurate or overly negative information. Focus on getting helpful information from trusted sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), state and local health departments.

Remember that strategies such as quarantining, social distancing, handwashing, and other safety precautions can all play an important role in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

Finding ways to protect your mental health when you are in quarantine is just as important as keeping your body healthy. Staying busy, keeping in contact with others by phone and social media, and maintaining a sense of structure are just a few key ways that you can mentally manage your quarantine.

Journaling corner

Seven more journal prompts to help you reflect during quarantine

We wrote about the benefits of journaling on page 11 of the April 2 issue of LW Weekly and included a week’s worth of journal prompts to help you get started. Below are seven more journaling or reflecting prompts to use for this week. 

We are often too hard on ourselves. Most of us would never be as critical of someone we love as we are to ourselves. In an effort to be more gentle with ourselves, write a letter to yourself from someone else’s point of view. If you’re struggling to start, begin with “Dear [name], I wish that you could see what I see in you. Here are some of my favorite things about you.

It’s time to check in: how has the coronavirus changed the way you use the internet? Have you found yourself looking at every notification from your news apps? Are your weekly screen time reports significantly higher than normal? Has an increase in screen time made you feel more connected or more scared? What is something you can do to increase positivity while online?

Most of California has been under social-distancing orders for almost a month now. What have you noticed about yourself and your community during this time? What has caught your attention the most?

Think about a new beginning that was meaningful for you. Write it down and reflect on what it created space for, and how your life was changed.

It’s important to count our blessings in life in troubled times. Write about the things that are lifting your spirits during this time. It can be anything from Facetime calls with family members to creating meals from an old family cookbook.

Write down five songs that transport you to a different time or significant moment in your life. Pick one and expand on that feeling. Write about how old you were, why this song had such an impact on you at that time.

Write what you see: go to a window or sit outside on your porch and write about the view. It can be a detailed description about what is going on outside or you can start to daydream and make the scene into a work of fiction. Either way, record what you see, hear, smell and feel.

For daily journal prompts, check out the New York Time’s writing prompts at www.nytimes.com/spotlight/learning-writing-prompts

OBITUARIES

Space is available for obituaries of residents and former residents.

• An “In Memoriam” column is available free of charge. Limited to name, mutual number and date of death.

• An obituary with or without photo is available free of charge for the first 250 words. Additional words will be charged at the rate of 25 cents per word. Notices written by the news staff will be free and no more than 250 words.

• Notices from mortuaries and non-GRF members will be printed exactly as submitted and charged at the non-member classified advertising rate, $12 for the first 12 words and 25 cents for each additional word. 

• Bordered, decorative obituaries and eulogies are available in any size at the prevailing display advertising rate.

• Obituaries may be published as news articles when the person has been a member of the GRF Board of Directors, or when, in the opinion of the managing editor, the passing of a person is newsworthy to a sufficiently large number of GRF members.

• A “Card of Thanks” section is available in the classified section of LW Weekly at the member classified advertising rate, $8 for the first 12 words and 25¢ per word thereafter, for persons wanting to express their thanks for help during bereavement, sickness, etc.

•••

Rosalie C. Lynch

May 1921- March 2020

On March 25, 2020,  Rosalie C. Lynch departed this life peacefully in her sleep at the age of 98. Rosalie will be remembered as a devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Rosalie was born in East Weymouth, Massachusetts on May 14, 1921. She was the only daughter of Gaeton and Rita Pecoraro. Her five brothers Alphonso, Frank, Gaeton, Harold and John are all deceased.

Rosalie married Robert Lynch on Aug. 31, 1941. She has two daughters, Rita Farnsworth and Patricia Hamm, four grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren including a set of triplets.

Rosalie was a member of many organizations: Children’s Benefit League,  P.E.O. and Leisure World Women’s Club were all very much a part of her life. She enjoyed and excelled in fundraising for a worthy cause.

The funeral services were private due to the coronavirus restrictions. There will be a Memorial Mass to be held at Holy Family Church, Leisure World at a later date to celebrate the life of Rosalie.

•••

Helen Irene Anderson

Sept. 1914–March 2020

Helen Irene Anderson was born Sept. 20, 1914, in Winston, Minnesota, and died on March 19, 2020. 

Helen was a homemaker and later became a home health care assistant. She lived in the Long Beach and Los Alamitos area before moving to Leisure World in 1993. 

She loved her music appreciation classes at BCC, world travel, and second hand stores. She died as she wanted–asleep in her own bed, surrounded by her “stuff”

She is survived by her son, Keith Anderson in San Anselmo, California and her daughter, Susan in Leisure World. She was predeceased by her first son, Lloyd Anderson JR and youngest son, Gordon Anderson. 

There will be no services as of this time.

Page 8, health and fitness

temporary meal plan changes

Do you currently belong to a meal plan or want to join one and are wondering what to do during the COVID-19 emergency? Here is specific information for those already on a meal plan or who want to join one.

Congregate meals at senior centers throughout Orange County will be converted to take-home meals. Seniors age 60 and older can pick up take-home meals from their local senior center. Check with the organizations listed below for the most current information on locations near you.

If seniors are current clients of the congregate lunch programs at the senior centers and need their food delivered to them instead, they can request this through the same organizations listed below North/Central County cities: 

Meals on Wheels Orange County, (714) 220-0224 

www.mealsonwheelsoc.org

Arrangements have been made to ensure all seniors in the program will continue to have access to food. 

Specifically, the Office on Aging has: 

• Implemented contingency plans to convert warm lunches served at senior centers in group settings to frozen take-home meals.

• Executed a plan to have take-home meals delivered to seniors’ homes if they are unable or unwilling to pick up at the senior center.

• Implemented a process that allows take-home lunches from the senior center to be picked up by the seniors’ designee.

• Ensured home-delivered meals will continue without interruption. Deliveries will be less frequent and contain enough food for several days.

• Confirmed drivers have been trained to deliver food using safe distances and have been given gloves to use if seniors need food to be brought inside their homes. 

For more information, call the Information & Assistance Call Center at (800) 510-2020.

City of Seal Beach Senior Meals  Meals on Wheels, (562) 430-6079

• The City of Seal Beach and Orange County received a directive from the Office on Aging requesting that all congregate meals be delivered directly to participants to keep seniors in their homes. 

At this time, the city is passing out frozen meals in place of congregate meals that participants can take home and consume. Allotments contain enough food for multiple days. 

A five-meal package is being distributed to participants. Registered participants have been contacted about the delivery of meals to their homes. 

Meals are currently delivered to the city once per week for those who traditionally participate in the congregate meals program. 

In addition to offering meals delivered to the home, Meals on Wheels will supply the city with additional shelf-ready meals that can be stored at the North Seal Beach Center, 3333 St. Cloud Drive, and picked up in person Monday-Friday. Staff will also store additional meals at the Seal Beach Senior Center, 707 Electric Ave., and can distribute those to any resident who needs them upon request.

If anyone would like to be added to the program, he or she can go to the North Seal Beach Center from 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Monday-Friday, to fill out an intake form. This requirement only needs to be completed one time. Once the intake form has been submitted staff can begin delivering frozen shelf-ready meals. Also, if the person does not want deliveries to their home, he or she can send a designated person to pick the meals up at the North Seal Beach Center.

Meals on Wheels Long Beach, (562) 439-5000, ext. 2

www.mowlb.org

 For more information, email cynthiat@lwsb.com or call (562) 431-6586, ext. 317.

—Cindy Tostado, 

GRF member resources and assistance liaison

chair class

Want to practice at home so you will be fit and ready when we resume our regular class schedule?  Just ask Cathleen Walters and she will deliver a copy of the music to you at your home.  You need a CD player or be able to play music CDs on your computer or home stereo. Just call  Cathleen at (562) 598-9149 or email cathleen33@gmail.com. All music is provided free of charge. Donations are welcome.  

Get up! Get out! Get Walking!

Walking is considered by health experts as one of the very best forms of exercise that you can do.  At this time when our amenities are closed and most people are staying home, walking while observing the social distancing rules is a great option for staying in shape, capturing some vital vitamin D and fresh air, and lifting your mood.

The Recreation Department has a supply of the Leisure World Walking Trails brochure, a guide to seven measured trails throughout the community. Stop by the Downtown Café and pick yours up while supplies last and explore places you may never have been.

Please direct any questions you may have to kathyt@lwsb.com.

— Kathy Thayer

assistant recreation manager

Cancer Increases Risk for COVID-19 Complications

There are a number of reasons why people living with cancer have a more difficult time fighting off infections, and it all boils down to the disease’s impact on the immune system.

Cancer itself can interfere with the body’s normal immune response. Some cancers, for instance, change the way the immune system’s blood cells work. Others can damage the body’s tissues, making them more prone to infections.

Then there’s cancer treatment. Common therapies, including chemotherapy and radiation, weaken the immune system by lowering the number of white blood cells in the body. This makes it more difficult to fight off any infection, including a coronavirus infection, explains Eric Winer, an oncologist and chief clinical strategy officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.

If you received cancer treatment in the past (not counting a bone marrow transplant), your immune system is likely no longer compromised, Winer points out. The risk is highest for those who are currently receiving treatment and those who recently stopped.

—-AARP

Plants as a form of therapy

 Nature therapy, also known as “forest bathing” can reduce blood pressure, lower stress, and even improve concentration and memory, among other benefits. You don’t have to live near a wooded area to reap the benefits. Incorporating organic elements into your home will help you stay in constant contact with nature. 

Below is a curated list of tips to help bring forest bathing into your home.

1. Create an indoor space for growing plants. Consider incorporating a green wall or mounted planter to add some life to an office or family room. You can also add plants to cabinets or window ledges.

2. Incorporate plants that act as natural air purifiers.

Peace Lily, Golden Pothos, English Ivy, Chrysanthemum, Gerbera Daisy, Mother-In-Law’s Tongue, Bamboo Palm, Azalea, Red-Edge Dracaena and the Spider Plant are some of the most recommended plants to help clean the air in your home.

3. Eat fresh herbs. Growing herbs in your home will add an element of green to your space, and fresh herbs are good for you, too. 

If you don’t have a green thumb, start with one of the easiest herbs to grow inside, such as mint or thyme.

Social Distancing and Isolation:

Not a good fit for our seniors 

Our world has changed drastically in a mere four weeks. We went from our typical daily routines to social distancing, quarantine and isolation in little time. For those who were already active and engaged, these folks have found ways to keep connections with others. Such as using telephones, video chatting, visiting from a 6-foot distance for instance. However, for those who are already struggling with isolation due to medical or mental health obstacles this can create even more of a challenge towards those fragile connections.

New terms and realities that we are coping with: 

1.  Social Distancing – also called “physical distancing”, means keeping space between yourself and other people outside of your home. This refers to a public health intervention that seeks to avoid face to face contacts that would limit disease transmission. Social Distancing needs to be practiced by the entire population to be effective.

 To practice social or physical distancing:

• Stay at least six feet away from other people

• Do not gather in groups

• Stay out of crowded places and avoid mass gatherings

2. Quarantine – Keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. Quarantine helps limit further spread of COVID-19.

3. Isolation – Separate sick people from healthy people. People who are in isolation should stay home. In the home, anyone sick should separate themselves from others by staying in a specific “sick” bedroom or space and using a different bathroom when possible.

What can we do as a community to help those in need?

1. Reach out from a distance to let him/her know you are there. You can do this by telephoning or even leaving a note on the door with your telephone number.

2. Sharing relevant information with your neighbor. Keep it positive.

3. Picking up an extra meal for your neighbor.

4. If it’s safe for you to shop or run errands for the person, offer to pick up something or have it delivered.

5. Encourage your isolated neighbors to create a safety plan.

Remember that you are not alone, we are all in this together! Have questions? Contact GRF Member Resource Liaison, Cindy Tostado, LCSW (562)431-6586 ext. 317

—Cindy Tostado

GRF member resources and assistance liaison

Precaution, prevention are safeguards

by Carson J. Blomquist

OptumCare

Whether it’s coronavirus, the flu, or measles, there has been a lot of news about diseases in the last few months. It can be pretty frightening, especially when there is so much incorrect information out there.

How can you keep yourself safe – and sane – when there is so much coverage? Start by minding your Ps and Qs:

Precaution: When there is news about an outbreak, find out what the basic precautions are. In most cases, it will be:

• Wash your hands. A good 20 seconds or more of handwashing with soap and water kills many of the germs we encounter. Wash your hands regularly.

• Stay home. Not feeling great? Call in sick and enjoy a day of rest. Catch up on your favorite books or shows. If you have a bug, you won’t spread it to others if you’re home. And if you don’t have a bug, well … we all need a day to relax.

• Cover up. Feel a cough or sneeze coming on? Cover your mouth and nose with your elbow – not your hands. If you can move away from others before it hits, even better. Sneezes can send germs up to ten feet away.

Prevention: There may not always be a vaccine for a disease, but if there is, get it. 

This is especially true for illnesses like influenza and bacterial pneumonia. These vaccines don’t just help you. They can help your family and neighbors. If a disease can’t infect you, you can’t spread it to others. 

Question: Are you really at risk? 

The news does a great job of sharing important information, but sometimes it can be difficult to understand. Find out who is at risk from the virus. People who have been traveling? People in a certain work industry? If you don’t match them, you’re probably at very low risk. Things change, of course, but always ask if you really are at risk. 

Whether it’s the flu or something new, mind your P’s and Q’s when the news comes on. Learn the basics about this virus, then go on with your day. And if you find yourself getting overwhelmed, do yourself a favor and turn the television off. 

Remember: this isn’t going to last forever. But it requires all of us to make an effort. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, consider calling a mental health support line. Optum’s Emotional Support Line is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at (866) 342-6892.

Page 15, sports  and games

LW Men’s Club

Marvin Jones remains the club president

The current president of the Leisure World Men’s Golf Club is Marvin Jones – a resident of Mutual 7. He assumed his duties in the beginning of 2020.  His goal is to build on the current membership  of about 60 men and grow its activities as soon as the golf courses open back up. 

Marvin was born in 1935 in Pensacola, FL. He graduated from Auburn University with a degree in Aeronautical Engineering but never practiced. After college he joined the Army for 3 years and was a member of an Airborne unit. He subsequently found his way into investment banking, financial planning and the securities business. He owned his own securities firm for 13 years and later worked with larger firms.

Marvin married Geri Jones in 1964 in Las Vegas (and no – Elvis did not marry him). He has one son and two grandchildren living in Long Beach. His favorite things to do are golfing, reading, jigsaw puzzles, attending concerts, dancing and playing social games. At one point in his life he was a full-time handyman and still enjoys doing little chores for his friends and neighbors.

He has been playing golf for 18 years. He holds a 14 handicap on our local course and probably a 20 on the outside. His favorite nearby course is Recreation Park in Long Beach. 

The Men’s Club that Marvin leads normally sponsors as many as four tournaments a month on the local course. The second and fourth Wednesdays are for members of the Men’s Club only. The third and fifth Wednesday (if there is one) are the Guys and Gals tournament. All games and tournaments are postponed until golf courses are back open to the public and stay home orders have been lifted.

Requirements are that you be a Men’s Club member and have a handicap. Additionally, the Club hosts a catered summer picnic and a Christmas party for its member, friends and guests. If you are interested in becoming a member once COVID-19 has subsided, leave a message for the membership chair at (801) 674-5975.

—David LaCascia

Cribbage player Evelyn turns 90

Evelyn “Evie” Ingram of Mutual 11 celebrated her 90th birthday on March 29 in front of her unit. Several of her friends and neighbors stopped by (at reasonable distances) to observe the occasion with champagne and cake – plus a rousing version of Happy Birthday. Conversations naturally revolved around the current health crisis but typically came back to remarking about her age, how youthful she appears and her good health. She remarked that she had good genes with parents who lived long and healthy lives. 

Evie had one older brother – a pianist for Woody Herman – who passed at the age of 69. Evie married Clifton “Bud” Alexander Ingram in 1950 and divorced in 1981. With him she has had two daughters and one son. Sadly, only one daughter remains. The surviving daughter is 69 and everyone that knows her says she looks 50 and inherited her mother’s good genes.  With six grandchildren, 11 (possibly more) great-grandchildren, and one great-great-child, Evie enjoys spending time with all of them.

Evie lived on the east coast in her early life and resided in several states. Her hometown is Belmont, Massachusetts – a few miles northwest of Cambridge. She moved from the east to California in 1951, shortly after her marriage. She says she has been gone from the east coast for so long she no longer “pawks da caw”.

She attended the University of New Hampshire for three years and completed her degree at the University of Alabama.

Evelyn was in a serious car accident last year and after an extended rehabilitation came back strong but is required to use a cane to walk any distance. Her passions here at Leisure World are card games including bridge, cribbage and poker.

—David LaCascia

GENERAL

JAFRA COSMETICS 

by Helen

LW Resident 562-421-5811

www.jafra.com/hwells

Business License #WEL0015

Soaps, lotions, scrubs, 

delivered directly. 4/23

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AVON

Lenora Browning, LW Resident. Phone 562-493-5457. Seal Beach Business License #BRN000. 06/17/20

GARDENING

FRANK’S GARDENING SERVICE 

Complete maintenance and landscape. Serving Leisure World since 1978. Planting, clean-ups, fertilization. New lawns, etc. Offering my services to all Mutual’s. Honest and reliable. State Contractor’s License #779462. Call 562-863-7739, 562-743-3832 or 714-527-1172. 05/14

HANDYMAN SERVICES

Additions & Remodeling, Kitchen & Bath Remodeling, Windows, Tile & Stonework. State Contractor’s License #393071. 

OGAN CONSTRUCTION, INC. 

(562) 596-7757.

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562-596-0559

LW DECOR INC.

Remodeling/Renovations

New triple pane windows,

laminate flooring, carpet patio

tile/carpet. Painting ceilings

made smooth, ceiling lights.

Exterior windows, 

refaced kitchen cabinets, 

refaced granite quartz countertops.. 

Lic. #723262. 07/02

LW DECOR INC.

562-596-0559

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JR HOME REPAIRS.  

Quality work. Perfectionist, honest & reliable. Call JR 562-519-2764 05/07

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MP  CONSTRUCTION

General Contractor

Specializing  in  remodeling, Additions, Reconstruction, Window replacement and more! Call for a free estimate. 

562-746-5400. 

License #954725. 03/26

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TONY DO MAINTENANCE

Windows-house cleaning.

Reasonable price. Excellent work.

(714) 534-1824. 4/23

BATHROOM REMODELING

We make your SHOWER/TUB brand new and/or convert it to a WALK IN SHOWER 

serving L.W. since 1999. 

Nu Kote 562-833-3911 

License #699080. 04/30

PAINTING

Bel-Rich Painting – Free 

estimates, Apartments, room by room, small jobs, colored walls. Contractor’s License #705131. 714-220-9702. 06/04

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Painting – Free estimates. 1 room or entire house & refinish kitchen cabinets. Call Jerry (714) 826-8636.

CA State License #675336. 05/14

———————————————-

562-596-0559

LW DECOR INC.

Only premium paints,

Ceilings made smooth.

New handles-hindges

Cown moulding installed.

License #723262.

LW DECOR INC

 40 years in LW.

562-596-0559. 07/02

FLOOR COVERINGS

310-261-0571

Interior Flooring Solutions

Hardwood floors, carpet, 

laminate, vinyl planks. 

25 years experience. 

Contractor License 1043763. 12/24

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562-596-0559

LW Decor Inc.

Laminate, Vinyl, Plank, Patio tile and Patio carpet.

License #723262.

40 years in Leisure World.

562-596-0559. 07/02

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING & REPAIR

All Year Carpet Cleaning

We just cleaned your neighbor’s house in Leisure World…

Would you like yours cleaned too?

Call Tito 562 658 9841. 05/07

Since 1988. 

State Contractors Lic. #578194.

SKYLIGHT SERVICES

SKYLIGHTS

CLEAN, REPAIR, REPLACE.

Licensed and insured.

Dan (562) 841-3787.

Seal Beach License #BRA0002. 04/09

WINDOW COVERINGS

LW DECOR INC.

Blinds, shutters, shades, 40 years serving Leisure World. Contractor’s License #723262. 

LW DECOR INC. 

562-596-0559. 07/02

Leisure World Helping Leisure World

Y’s Service Club of the YMCA will assist residents with small non-professional jobs. We change light bulbs, clean air conditioner filters, hang a small picture or mirror, remove or place items on a high shelf, air bicycle tires, etc. Donations gladly accepted. Call weekdays between 9 am-5 pm, (562) 596-9906.

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“ROLLIN THUNDER”

GOLF CART CLUB 

Offers FREE advice on buying and selling of your golf cart. 

562-431-6859.

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Does your walker need new tennis balls? Delivery and installation provided. Please give your name and phone number. Maria Giegerich 562-596-9983. Free of charge.

HOME CARE PERSONAL ASSISTANT

Just Like Your Daughter

Personal Assistant/

Girl Friday

Available for: 

errands, scheduling and 

transportation for medical

appointments, 

patient advocate, shopping, domestic organization, 

paperwork, bill pay

All with compassion 

and care.

Just Like Your Daughter

Call Janice, 714-313-4450

SB Lic. #JUS0006/Bonded 04/23

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EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER

Over 20 years in Leisure World with Excellent References.  Hourly or Live-in. Please Call Pampet: 562-371-4895. Seal Beach License PAN0003 06/11

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Elderly care. Live-in, live-out. 30 years of experience. Cooking, cleaning, medications, companions, doctors. Experience with dementia. Licensed by the state. 

Gloria 949-371-7425. 05/07

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CHRISTIAN HOME CARE

Referral Agency. Experienced, knowledgeable caregivers, honest, assertive, fluent English. Hourly/full-time, doctor’s appointments, errands. Bernadine 562-310-0280. Seal Beach Business License #BCS0002. Bonded/insured. 6/10/20

BEAUTY SERVICES

Hair Stylist, 25 years experience. Shampoo and roller set, cut, perm, color, manicure/pedicure. Warm and friendly service. Available for in-house appointments for special occasion, $100+. Tammy Nguyen, 714-425-4198. Phenix Salon. 05/14

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In home hair care, serving the men and women of Leisure World for 36 years. Mel, cell: 562-480-9341. License #KC75538. 05/07

HOUSE CLEANING

GRACIAN’S HOUSECLEANING & WINDOWS.

Windows 10% off first cleaning

General housecleaning

Excellent referrals in LW

(562) 307-3861. 

20 years experience.

Seal Beach Business License gra0006. 06/25

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Patricia House Cleaning, weekly

or monthly. Excellent referrals in

Leisure World. 562-397-4659 Seal

Beach License LUC0001.04/23

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General housekeeping, 30 years of experience. Bi-weekly or monthly. Seal Beach Business license RAZ0002. Gloria 949-371-7425 05/07

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Maria House Cleaning

We’ll make your house look as nice as possible! 15 years of experience, We can work with your schedule. Bi-weekly or monthly. Deep cleaning. 

Call or text 714-496-2885. 

Bus. Lic #HER0008. 04/23

COMPUTERS

FRUSTRATED 

(562)755-6199

Everything for your computer (PC or Mac), cell phone, TV, stereo, any electronic device. 

Tina Schaffer. Seal Beach Bus.   

License #CIP0001 05/28

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John’s Computer Services

562-733-9193

Virus removal, Repair, Training, Software, Wireless, Internet 

Security. LW Resident

 SB License FUH0001. 06/25

Electric CarTs/ Scooters/Mobile Chairs for sale

ANY KIND OF CAR

Boat, motorcycle, truck – running or not. We are local – call anytime! We pay cash and remove promptly!We do DMV and Release of liability for you! Bonded/Licensed, since 1985! Call us so we can come out and give you a quote. 562-684-0901. 05/07

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Golf Cart, Sales, parts and services. 714-292-9124. 05/14

———————————————————————–

Scooter for sale $200. 

562-522-0003. 04/16

TRANSPORTATION

Need a lift? Pam Miller. 

LW Resident. 310-227-1258. 04/30

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Rides by Russ, 

With the personal touch.

For over 4 years I have been giving all types of rides to Leisure World residents. Rides to the airports, doctors, cruise ports, shopping and errands I also enjoy helping my neighbors with chores and maintenance around their homes. Russ 714-655-1544. 04/23 

Autos/Boats/RV’s Trailers FOR SALE

ELECTRIC CAR PADS

Installed at your residence. Call Frank 562-743-3832. State Contractor’s License #779462. 05/14

MOVING, HAULING & STORAGE SERVICES

J&D HAUL AWAY AND CLEAN-UP SERVICE

No job too small, fast, reliable, great prices. Seal Beach Business License

BRA0002. Dan: 562-841-3787 04/09

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A FRIEND AND A TRUCK

Your moving service, any size job. Call 310-387-2618. Business License RO263644. 06/25

LW REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

PRICE REDUCTION!

1461 PELHAM Bldg 132 # H 

$ 204,900

2 BDR, 1 BATH 

Move in ready home.

Laminate Floors, 3 Skylights, A/C, wraparound Patio

New Refrigerator w/large 

bottom freezer capacity.

Plus 2 newer sliders in front, Very close to Medical Center

And Clubhouses 5 & 6. 

Contact Joe@ 714-474-6204

GOOD HOMES REAL 

ESTATE. MLS# OC20017837. 04/16

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS FOR SALE

Small Bissell Carpet Extractor. $35. Marina Tesla, 12-34K. 

(562) 340-1506.